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So I try and be a responsible biker and patronize my LBS. I have a 28h record hub rear 10speed that I want built up. I take it into the shop and ask the guy to build it with a velocity aerohead OC rim.

When I got it back I was a bit surprised. I'm not sure if he built it right. The rim looks like its off set to the drive side. ie the longer face of the rim is facing the non drive side and the shorter face of the rim is facing the drive side/casette.

Is this correct I always assumed that the longer face would be toward the casette. I've seen diagrams from the ritchey site that show it this way but maybe its because of their hubs?

Please advise if this wheel was built correctly. If not I will take it back.

Thanks
 

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Dan0930 said:
So I try and be a responsible biker and patronize my LBS. I have a 28h record hub rear 10speed that I want built up. I take it into the shop and ask the guy to build it with a velocity aerohead OC rim.

When I got it back I was a bit surprised. I'm not sure if he built it right. The rim looks like its off set to the drive side. ie the longer face of the rim is facing the non drive side and the shorter face of the rim is facing the drive side/casette.

Is this correct I always assumed that the longer face would be toward the casette. I've seen diagrams from the ritchey site that show it this way but maybe its because of their hubs?

Please advise if this wheel was built correctly. If not I will take it back.

Thanks
I'm not sure.....That's not normal for sure.
 

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Listen to rruff!

rruff said:
Take it back and get your money back... do *not* have them redo it. Wheels should be built by someone who knows how to build wheels... and he obviously doesn't.
Just get your money back. I ride the same rims, and based on the way you described it they did it backwards. This shop has no clue. Of course they will want to "make good" and do a rebuild, but based on this example does anyone want to guess on the quality of the build?

Get your money back and RUN to a different LBS (or do a search on the forum. Lot's of quality builders are recommended here...Ligero, Mike Garcia, etc.)
 

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pluck the spokes on both the drive and non-drive side. if the rim was built properly, there would be a slight tension difference. if the mechanic was drunk and got the rim backwards, there should be a huge difference. if I'm interpreting your post right, though, it sounds like the mechanic was drunk or incompetent.
 

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Dan0930 said:
As a follow up. I brought the wheel back and explained the situation. They immediately rebuilt the wheel.
Let us know how it goes...

Mistakes DO happen. Once is no big deal. Repeated mistakes = problem.

M
 

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Good for you for taking it back. A person who builds a wheel like this is not someone you want building your wheel so hopefully a more Sr. mechanic did the lace and draw on it. Asymmetric rims are meant to reduce dish in a wheel and add to their strength. By moving the spokes over slightly from the drive train, the non drive spokes aren't "leaning" over as much and the drive spokes aren't near vertical as they are on a traditional rim. This balances out the work load between the drive and non-drive spokes and adds to strength. To contrast, a track hub (where this is no cassette) has the non drive flange in roughly the same place as a road hub but the drive side flange is moved out from the center and is located roughly in the middle of where the cassette would be. As a result, the wheel is near symmetric, like a front wheel, and is very strong. They applied this logic to a road wheel and the asymmetric rim was the result. Now us big guys can ride the light stuff...
 

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Fogdweller said:
As a result, the wheel is near symmetric, like a front wheel, and is very strong. They applied this logic to a road wheel and the asymmetric rim was the result.
As Mark McM pointed out recently, a symetric rim has greater lateral stiffness than an asymetric one. An asymetric rim helps balance the tension left to right, which helps to keep the left side from going slack and failing. On a regular rim you can just put lighter spokes on the left side... but when you do that, you've decreased the stiffness again. I think it is pretty much a wash either way.
 

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Assymetric rims and wheel stiffness

rruff said:
As Mark McM pointed out recently, a symetric rim has greater lateral stiffness than an asymetric one.
Actually, I showed how a wheel with more dish is (laterally) stiffer than a wheel with less dish - assuming the same total flange width, and that spokes don't go slack. This is because increase in stiffness due to the spokes with the larger bracing angle is greater than the decrease in stiffness due to the spokes with the smaller bracing angle. Since an assymetric rim only changes dishing, and not flange spacing, it actually slightly decreases wheel stiffness.

rruff said:
An asymetric rim helps balance the tension left to right, which helps to keep the left side from going slack and failing.
This is the real reason why assymetric rims are generally an advantage. For the same flange spacing, they help balance right/left wheel strength and increase durability. The small decrease in stiffness is rarely a performance disadvantage.
 
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