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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I have been Mountain biking for about 15 yrs, and it seems that everytime I ride mtb with a dedicated road biker they just smoke me!

So after a trip to Fruita, Colorado, and after having my arse handed to me once again by a roadie, I took the plunge and bought a new Giant OCR C3. The bike is fitted well and currently too pretty to put on my bike rack so it is riding in the cab with me, the kid, the dog, etc,,,,

My question: after only briefly riding it at the shop I took it on the road yesterday for a 15 mile ride... I was terrified!!!!! I dialed up to about 30 mph and felt very wobbly... I also didn't feel comfortable looking over my shoulder for traffic, or even moving my hands around on the handle bars. I really thought I was going to wreck. I was much more comfortable in the teens, but was actually shaken.

I have ridden mtb for 15 yrs and hit 30 mph on singletrack... not scared at all... bike feels solid.

I am thinking that it will just take some getting used to, I am not used to having to keep my upper body so "quite" while riding. also balance seems to be more exagerated on the road bike.

So here I am new to this forum, looking for advice. I hope more saddle time will cure my anxiety, but have any of you had this happen? I take advice well, so if you have any suggestions I will try them and report back.

Thanks
 

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Captain Obvious
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a few rides will get you used to the feel. i found my road bike to be sketchy at first. it's just a different feel. you'll adjust quickly.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
"dainty and squirrely"
Nail/head... Well time in the saddle shouldn't be a problem. After I bought it my wife said "you damn well better ride it", so I know I have her support. My MTB is a Titus Motolite... bomb-proof...

the tires are just so thin....

thank you for reinforcing what I already suspected.
 

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Failboat Captian
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Fore-aft balance may have a bit to do with it. AT speed, with too little weight on the front wheel, it'll get pretty squirrley. Obviously, fore-aft balance is affected by lots of stuff, such as saddle position, saddle tilt, bar reach, saddle to bar drop, etc. Let yourself get moving and try slight adjustments, just moving forward and back a bit, and see if it has any effect on the stability. Also, you just notice it more on a road bike. On a MTB, when you are doing 30mph, you're bouncing all over and it's pretty sketchy, even though you are in control. It may be that you expected the roadie to feel like a car going 30mph, and were surprised to find that it does take some handling skills.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
What about changing positions on the handlebars? This seemed to be challanging at 30mph.

I agree with JTB that perhaps my 1st ride was influenced by some preconceived notions of how it should feel. Ah-well, I love mt biking, and I am sure I will love road biking. I just hope my wife gets used to having the new bike encoaching on her side of the bed :)

thanks again...
 

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WP Local said:
What about changing positions on the handlebars? This seemed to be challenging at 30mph. Snip!
When I am getting ready to enter a fast decent, I come off the hoods and go into the drops. I just change one hand at a time to the new position before I hit 30 mph. Do the reverse on the other end when it feels comfortable to do so and you need to start climbing again.

Also, try to stay "loose" on the bike and try not to tense up. Do your best to relax. And believe me, it DOES becomes easier and more comfortable with practice.

Later,

Jay B.
 

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Treker said:
Also, try to stay "loose" on the bike and try not to tense up. Do your best to relax. And believe me, it DOES becomes easier and more comfortable with practice.
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+1. Staying relaxed is key. The more you tense up at speed, the more squirrely it can be. I switched from MTB to the road and dealt with the same issues. If you really get some miles in on the new bike, you'll crush your MTB buddies. ;-)
 
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