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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I figure this sort of thread has been done to death.
But here goes.

Currently, I have 2 bikes that I am considering for cycle commuting.
My commute is 10 miles each direction. I am planning on setting up the bike with a rack and panniers on the back, a headlight and flashing tail light for night riding. Likely fenders as well.

The 2 bikes are as follows:

2007 Raleigh XXIX 29er (mountain bike) w/ 2x9 drive train. The bike has a front RockShox Reba fork. It's about 28lbs in its current form. All of the parts are modern, standardized stuff.

197? Peugeot that I got from my father who bought it new. It a lugged and brazed steel frame. I think it was one of the PX-10's. My dad painted it when he got it new and the only identifiers on it are the Peugeot sticker on the head tube, and chromed fork legs and seat stays. It's got StrongLight crank, Huret derailleur (my dad swapped it out when the plastic on the original Simplex broke), 10 speeds, tubular tires. It's all the obsolete French standard.

I know that Harris Cyclery has some of the French standard components. However, my concern with the bike is that I am a heavier guy (currently 240lbs, which is why I am going to start cycle commuting) and the fact that parts are pretty hard to come by comparatively speaking. -Some, like brake pads, seem to be unobtanium.

My first thought is to do some maintenance and some modernization (clipless pedals) and run the road bike as is. However, I think it might be interesting to get the OE parts that I can, like the Simplex derailleur, and restore the bike.

I'd appreciate any info.
 

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I was leaning strongly to the 29er, and then noticed you said the Peugeot has tubular tires. Unless you plan to replace those wheels, that tipped it completely to the 29er. I wouldn't want to think about changing a flat tubular on a commute.

It would be nice to fix up the Peogeot for other riding.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I was leaning strongly to the 29er, and then noticed you said the Peugeot has tubular tires. Unless you plan to replace those wheels, that tipped it completely to the 29er. I wouldn't want to think about changing a flat tubular on a commute.

It would be nice to fix up the Peogeot for other riding.
I usually carry a tube or 2 when I pedal my mountain bikes. -Those are the Maxxis Welterweight DH tubes (read: THICK and heavy).

I figure I can carry an extra tubular tire in my pannier and if I flat on a commute, it seems that a tubular is actually faster than a clincher. I pulled the tires off last night while I was checking things out to check the 'glue' or whatever they call the stuff that holds the tire on. It actually seemed ALOT faster than breaking the bead on a clincher type tire.
 

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The pugeout is probally the better choice for commuting. But tubulars arnt the best choice. For ease of everything, why not try the pugeout for a month, see if you really like commuting.
If so a wheel swap is the first place to start. Clinchers are a much better place to be. From there the sky's the limit, that old bike is perfect for doing what you want to do.

Bill
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The pugeout is probally the better choice for commuting. But tubulars arnt the best choice. For ease of everything, why not try the pugeout for a month, see if you really like commuting.
If so a wheel swap is the first place to start. Clinchers are a much better place to be. From there the sky's the limit, that old bike is perfect for doing what you want to do.

Bill
What about injecting some Stans tire sealant into the tubular?

I've had some good luck using that with a 'ghetto tubeless' setup on my mountain bikes. Kind of a thin slime.
 

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I figure I can carry an extra tubular tire in my pannier and if I flat on a commute, it seems that a tubular is actually faster than a clincher. I pulled the tires off last night while I was checking things out to check the 'glue' or whatever they call the stuff that holds the tire on. It actually seemed ALOT faster than breaking the bead on a clincher type tire.
I'll defer to the real tubular experts, but if they came off that easily, I don't think that "glue" (it's called "glue") was in safe condition.
 

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I'll defer to the real tubular experts, but if they came off that easily, I don't think that "glue" (it's called "glue") was in safe condition.
Firstly - Stan's latex sealant has saved 3 tubular tires in the last 6 months for me. At about $3 it has become my friend.
Lastly - Gluing tubes to rims is not for everyone, but changing a tire can be just as fast as with clinchers. I regularly ride tubulars not glued and for casual riding there is no problem. The argument for clinchers is that you can buy a more commuter durable tire.

To the OP - Use the 29er with the narrowest tires you can - lock out the front suspension and go. Save the Peugeot PX-10 for more special rides.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Firstly - Stan's latex sealant has saved 3 tubular tires in the last 6 months for me. At about $3 it has become my friend.
Lastly - Gluing tubes to rims is not for everyone, but changing a tire can be just as fast as with clinchers. I regularly ride tubulars not glued and for casual riding there is no problem. The argument for clinchers is that you can buy a more commuter durable tire.

To the OP - Use the 29er with the narrowest tires you can - lock out the front suspension and go. Save the Peugeot PX-10 for more special rides.

I swear by Stans and run it in all of my bikes, tubeless or not.

Otherwise, the 29er is kind of what I am thinking. A bit more durable for my heavy frame and parts that are up to current standard and not unobtanium.
 

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The Peugeot PX10 was their top-of-the-line retail racing bike in the early 70, second from the top after the PY10 came out. The frame and fork are double butted Reynolds 531 throughout. It is a light weigh racing frame, not meant to take hard pounding or abuse.

Commute on the modern Raleigh; it is built to take the punishment and if something does wear out or break it will be easy to replace.

Restore the Peugeot for pleasure rides.

FYI for a PX-10 the hardest parts to find are going to be the headset (because the odd size) and the bottom bracket (because of the obsolete threading.) If these 2 parts are not worn out, everything else (either modern or OE) is going to be much easier.

If you can find a brake pad that has the same attachment method as the OE pads (i.e. screw in pad fits hole in caliper) you can sometime make the wrong size pad fit your old calibers. If the new pad is too big to fit you may be able to cut it down with a fine tooth saw. If the new pad is too small you may be able to shim it into the caliber.
Couple of articles on restoring old Peugeots:
French Bicycles
French Bikes
 

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Unless your willing to dump money into a new set of clincher wheels for the P I wouldn't bother using it. If flats concern you then you should take the other bike and get a set of really tough tires like the Specialized Nimbus Armadillo tire; or for a bit less money the Panaracer Pasela TG is fantastic, it's lighter then the Nimbus and very reliable and long wearing. There are a few other tires out there too that will work, but flat protection starts with the tire not a liner or a tube.

Unless you're very proficient with tubulars I wouldn't use them to commute on. You need reliability, you don't need flats to make you late to work, get late to work to many times and your job could become extinct.

If you decide on adding liners to your tire protection the best is the Panaracer FlatAway liner.
 

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The Peugeot PX10 was their top-of-the-line retail racing bike in the early 70, second from the top after the PY10 came out. The frame and fork are double butted Reynolds 531 throughout. It is a light weigh racing frame, not meant to take hard pounding or abuse.

Commute on the modern Raleigh; it is built to take the punishment and if something does wear out or break it will be easy to replace.

Restore the Peugeot for pleasure rides.

FYI for a PX-10 the hardest parts to find are going to be the headset (because the odd size) and the bottom bracket (because of the obsolete threading.) If these 2 parts are not worn out, everything else (either modern or OE) is going to be much easier.

If you can find a brake pad that has the same attachment method as the OE pads (i.e. screw in pad fits hole in caliper) you can sometime make the wrong size pad fit your old calibers. If the new pad is too big to fit you may be able to cut it down with a fine tooth saw. If the new pad is too small you may be able to shim it into the caliber.
Couple of articles on restoring old Peugeots:
French Bicycles
French Bikes
This is the important stuff. Frame specs will be p****ng you off every time you have to deal with the availability of parts. My PX10 was the only frame I have no regrets over getting rid of and I have been through a lot of frames. It was also very poorly aligned. I gave it away.

Larry
 

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For the kind of mileage you'll be riding I'd opt for the PX10. Gotta change those wheels out for clinchers tho. Just gotta.
 
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