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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Don't know if this belongs here, but it is an older road bike so I figured why not.

Ok, so I am looking for a first road bike, and my friend offered me his old road bike, and I have no clue if it is worth it. Forgive any spellings because I have no clue how to spell Italian brand names, and I am describing it as how he described it to me.

It is a mid 80's Liotto frame with double butted tubing, chrome lugs, and anti drop out. Liotto fork (steel). Shimano Sante cassette, Sugino crank, Campy Athena bearings, and Canetti (sp?) bars/stem.

He built the bike origionally, and has cared for it very well. I am looking to get into cycling but don't want to break the bank quite yet (still a college student). Also, it has downtube shifters. Is it possible to upgrade to STI shifters? He will let me have it for two hundred and will throw in some rollers to get me started. Is it a deal? Any info will be appreciated. Thanks.
 

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I know this isn't the question your asking, but for me STI shifters would not be an upgrade. I don't know the brand, but double butted tubing and mid 1980's is a good combination. Wait! Did you say chrome lugs? That could be great deal for $200 (especially with the rollers), unless there is something wrong with it, like major rust. Good luck.

P.S. What the hell is 'anti drop out'?
 

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buy it. here's a link to some info about Liotto

http://search.bikelist.org/?SearchString=liotto

nothing wrong with DT shifters, but you can "upgrade" to brifters if you want. your DT shifters may already be STI. sounds like it's a pretty decent frameset.
 

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moschika said:
nothing wrong with DT shifters, but you can "upgrade" to brifters if you want. your DT shifters may already be STI. sounds like it's a pretty decent frameset.


uh, no... STI=Shimano Total Integration, i.e., brake lever + shifter all in one package, "brifter". introduced in 1990 or so. you're prob talking about indexing, i.e., move the lever until it clicks and it shifts one gear, non-friction.

an STI upgrade on this bike is def more than just buying the shifters and new cables, and if not careful op could spent a lot of $ and not have a bike that shifts very well. gotta make sure the cassette (maybe freewheel on this bike) spacing and rear der pull are compatible with the appropriate lever... the rear spacing is prob 126, def not modern 130. heck, the STI shifters alone would cost about or more than the entire bike. in addition to STI/cables, he could need a new rear der (maybe front), chain and rear wheel/cassette. better to just leave it alone or get something else




.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
So what should I ask/look for when considering this bike? Am I retarded for even considering this option over just going out and buying a new trek 1000/1.2 entry level road bike? I just don't want to break the bank trying to get into the sport. Let me know what you think.

The bike was thrown on the scale - came in at 20 lbs with that heavy front chrome fork.

Here are some pictures, though the camera setting was set for indoors. Oh well. The bike is a blue metal flake.
 

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bikes!? said:
So what should I ask/look for when considering this bike? Am I retarded for even considering this option over just going out and buying a new trek 1000/1.2 entry level road bike? I just don't want to break the bank trying to get into the sport. Let me know what you think.

The bike was thrown on the scale - came in at 20 lbs with that heavy front chrome fork.

Here are some pictures, though the camera setting was set for indoors. Oh well. The bike is a blue metal flake.
That's a very nice bike that's worth $200. If it's the right bike for you depends on how you plan to ride and if you like to work on bikes. You probably wouldn't want to race that bike or ride in agressive pacelines as it is. Also, if you live in a hilly area then the gearing isn't low enough. Personally, I like that bike much more than a new trek 1000, but I would put $200 and quite a bit of work into it to make it the way I would want it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Reynolds531 said:
That's a very nice bike that's worth $200. If it's the right bike for you depends on how you plan to ride and if you like to work on bikes. You probably wouldn't want to race that bike or ride in agressive pacelines as it is. Also, if you live in a hilly area then the gearing isn't low enough. Personally, I like that bike much more than a new trek 1000, but I would put $200 and quite a bit of work into it to make it the way I would want it.
Yeah that is half the charm of this bike. I want to put the work in, learn how to wrench, and the guy is throwing in stands, tools, parts and basically is unloading his garage onto me. I plan to just get involved with the local club, and if I really like the sport begin to build the bike up and pursue cycling more heavily.

However he did mention that the bike got hit once by a car, which bent the seatstays. The frame was immediately shipped off and repaired, with no resulting kinks in the seatstays. Is this a problem? What should I look for when inspecting it. Also is very very minimal isolated surface rust a problem (1/4 size spot)? I eventually want to sandblast and repaint the bike with the original Liotto logo.
 

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bikes!? said:
Yeah that is half the charm of this bike. I want to put the work in, learn how to wrench, and the guy is throwing in stands, tools, parts and basically is unloading his garage onto me. I plan to just get involved with the local club, and if I really like the sport begin to build the bike up and pursue cycling more heavily.

However he did mention that the bike got hit once by a car, which bent the seatstays. The frame was immediately shipped off and repaired, with no resulting kinks in the seatstays. Is this a problem? What should I look for when inspecting it. Also is very very minimal isolated surface rust a problem (1/4 size spot)? I eventually want to sandblast and repaint the bike with the original Liotto logo.


until I read the wrecked part I was going to say buy it... it would be the perfect bike to learn to wrench (esp with the other free stuff), simpler without all the quirky bells and whistles of today's bikes. you could learn all the basics on it... what does repaired mean? were the stays replaced? has it been ridden hard since the repair, or just been sitting in the garage? if the tools and other stuff aren't crap it could still be a great deal
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
All I know is that the seatstays were bent when the original owner of the frame (a local North Carolina LBS owner) had an encounter with a car. He immediately broke down the bike and took it to someone who knew how to repair things like this. The guy said you can't tell that it was repaired, and it rides great. But someone told me to look for kinks in the tubing. If there are kinks - it's a no go. If you can't notice any repair work - nothing to worry about. Is this correct?
 

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bikes!? said:
All I know is that the seatstays were bent when the original owner of the frame (a local North Carolina LBS owner) had an encounter with a car. He immediately broke down the bike and took it to someone who knew how to repair things like this. The guy said you can't tell that it was repaired, and it rides great. But someone told me to look for kinks in the tubing. If there are kinks - it's a no go. If you can't notice any repair work - nothing to worry about. Is this correct?
Pretty much true, for steel. A wrecked steel bike can be repaired relatively easily. THE acid test, of course, is whether it shimmies badly on descents. You might also try riding it hands-free, to see if it wants to dive to one side or the other. You can also try running a string from one rear dropout around the head tube and back to the other, to see if the frame is in alignment (which can be fixed, if it isn't; some shops might also have gauges for this), but for me, the proof is in the riding.

Note: There are a number of causes of shimmy descent, and I suppose it would be possible for the frame to be perfectly aligned, yet the bike still shimmies downhill (e.g., due to a badly out of dish wheel). But given the history of the bike, well....
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 · (Edited)
I don't think the guy is out to jip me on a bike. He is also a former technician. In the end though...

Is the bike w/ everything else worth 200 bucks?

I just want to get into the sport, and not be broke buying a bike and accessories. I want to build it up/restore it a little here and there and remain somewhat competitive (not be the last guy), and eventually just keep it as a trainer when I decide to move up.
 

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For $200 you get a ridable bike, rollers, tools, and the guidance of a former technician, sounds like a perfect place to start.

BTW, I ride my retro/vintage steel bikes on fast group rides all the time and it isn't any harder than on my new wonder bikes (it's hard either way). Also, 20 pounds is a great weight for an old steel bike like that.

Also, if the guy who wrecked it and repaired it was a shop owner I'd feel pretty safe. Shop owners ride what they want, the fact that he chose that bike is a good thing, the fact that he liked it enough to have it repaired is even better.

If it were me in your shoes I'd do it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
threesportsinone said:
If it were me in your shoes I'd do it.
Yeah I am going to look at it tomorrow. If all checks out and I pick it up I will post pictures tomorrow evening. Thanks for all the input! I am sure I will have tons of questions as time goes on and I get deeper into it.
 

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FatTireFred said:
uh, no... STI=Shimano Total Integration, i.e., brake lever + shifter all in one package, "brifter". introduced in 1990 or so. you're prob talking about indexing, i.e., move the lever until it clicks and it shifts one gear, non-friction.
yes, you're correct. i was thinking of indexed shifting and confused it with STI. my b.
 

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bikes!? said:
Is the bike w/ everything else worth 200 bucks?
yes.

the crash/repair doesn't sound like a problem. i doubt someone you know, is going to give you something they think could be unsafe, especially as a novice rider. if you have a local bicycle framebuilder - you could also have them check out the alignment.

and if you're getting all kinds of other stuff, that alone sounds like it's worth $200 by itself. tools ain't cheap.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 · (Edited)
Well here it is...this is what kind of bike my 200 dollars got me. Went to look at it, rode it, figured out how it exactly made it to America. Other stuff I discovered: 57 frame, Campy dropouts, chrome Liotto "air" fork, Shimano Sante front derailleur, Campy Athena BB. And I am definitely digging those chrome lugs! What's the deal w/ the "Giro D'Italia" Cinelli bars?

First thing is first, gotta sandblast/repaint and take care of the frame. Though I don't know how to sandblast or beadblast and save the lugs. Also debating on removing the downtube shifters and installing 7 speed Shimano STI shifters. It's all superficial rust. Took a snapshot of the worst section. Suggestions? There is no way to have the chrome lugs re-chromed is there?

Let me know what you think. It's my first bike...ever.
 

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Fwiw...

If you are new to cycling then for $200 and all the freebies your friend will throw in then its a good deal. Yes, it needs a paint job but should get you started and let you decide if cycling is your thing or not. The pics make it look ok but the underside rust could be a problem. I would ask a local framebuilder, if available, if the rust issue can be solved or there is no hope. On the plus side the chromed lugs are really nice and with a steel bike you can literally ride it until it breaks. If the frame became toast then you could likely recoup your $200 by parting it out on Ebay.

Takmanjapan
 
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