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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm not sure whether to post this here or in mechanics, but here goes.

This is an (I think) an 80-90s vintage Sannino Frame and fork. 700c wheel size. In pretty good shape. My first retro-rebuild, although I rode the things up until about 10 years ago!

Brakes: I have on hand a set of Ultegra Calipers, 6500 series in case that makes a difference. I know they'll work with the brake levers I also have because I used them on another bike together. Will I be able to install these "modern" brakes on this older frame? Any cautions, gotchas or workarounds I'll need to do?

headset I need to buy a new headset. The only thing I'm not certain of is stack height. The frame's head tube is 5 1/8 inches (call it 130 mm). The fork's steer tube is 9" (call it 230mm). This leaves a difference of 100 mm. I'm just wondering how this relates to stack height options I can or should look at. Evidently the original campy headset is 36.3 stack height. I'm just not sure how this works for stack height sizing. Can a 40-42mm stack height headset work? How do you use the difference between the steer tube and head tube lengths to ascertain minimums or maximum stack height for headsets that can be used?

Finally seat tube. It is 27.2 i.d. Does this tell me anything about the tubeset the frame has? I'm pretty sure it's Columbus, but don't know anything beyond that. In case it matters, the frame and fork are about 5.75 lbs (2.6 kg) in a 54X54 size. This doesn't really matter, but I'm curious and trying to start learning about this stuff.

Thanks for your advice
 

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Brakes: Your brakes will likely work fine. There are two issues with brakes. First, on older frames the brake bolt extends through the frame and is secured with a nut. On newer (and modern) frames the brakes are held on with a recessed nut. Your frame is new enough that it likely uses the same style nut as is common today. Second, the recessed nuts come in different lengths. Steel forks use relatively short nuts, while carbon forks tend to use longer ones. If yours is the wrong size you'll need to buy the correct size - any LBS can help you out.

Headsets - There is quite a bit of range that is "okay" for stack height. If you have the fork installed with the old headset, remove the top nut from the headset and remove any spacers beneath it. Any headset that lets you install the top nut using at least 3-4 threads will work. Ideally there's room for a small keyed spacer and enough threads to install the top cap. It sounds like you have a long steerer. You can install spacers to fill the gap between the two nuts on the headset. Too many is likely not a great idea as the stem's quill should extend below the threads on the steerer. If the fork is too long, the top can be cut off to make it work - and threads can be added if necessary.

Seat post - Most nicer steel frames used 27.2mm seat posts - although other sizes can be found on nice frames. The seat post size doesn't really help much to determine the tubeset.
 

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Laffeaux's got ya well covered. I was thinking you might have a threadless fork with such a long steerer tube... right?

If so, you have ~110mm to work with for stack height of headset + stem (+ spacers).
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks for the comments!

Yea, it turns out the steer tube size is not 230, but 170 mm, leaving a 40 mm difference, not 100. The guy I bought it from was thinking of the wrong fork. I don't actually have the frame in hand but should shortly. My questions here are mainly so I can get the few parts I know I will need that I probably won't easily find locally ordered so when it arrives next week I can put it together right away and try to ride next weekend.

I'm interested in the weight. The guy is reliable so I have no reason to doubt it, but we'll see. From what I've read about Sannino, my guess is that it's Columbus SL at the least, maybe SLX. That doesn't matter to me at all except curiousity. I already have a weight weenie bike, and don't really have a desire to make a 21 lb bike out of this unless it just happens.

It's going to be a real odd ball at first - I have almost enough parts to get it running, but there will be little elegant about it with old and vintage American, Japanese, Tiwanese and Italian parts. I'm counting on the friction DT shifters to make it all play together nicely.

I might even (choke) use a threaded-threadless stem adapter I have in that box and experiment with set up using the threadless stems I have on hand already - then look for a nice quill. I'm pretty sure I know what I'll need except I'm not sure of the seat tube and other angles on this thing so won't know how the reach will work out until I get the saddle mounted correctly.

My plan in the long run - assuming it fits and is comfortable - is probably to do a modern build on it with a drive train I don't have yet and will be proper for this frame (I have Shimano and Sram, so you figure it out), unless I re-fall in love with downtube shifters, in which case I'll try to find some period correct-ish parts, or at least look like it. One given is that I'm modifying the rear end to 130 regardless, but my understanding is that DT shifters don't have a problem with 8 and 9, and maybe even 10 speed cassettes. That will be my first experiment (of course I have all of them!)

So far there's nothing original except the frame and fork themselves, so there's not that "pressure", just the goal of having a nice riding, good quality steel bike for an economy budget and having a fun new project for N+1.

I'm still on the look out for an older bike that's original enough to keep and/or enhance the originality without a major effort. Next project ... :cool:
 
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