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Tell me about the oldest road bike you have & what makes it worth keeping. At a local bike shop I bought a magnificent pearl white Torpado Super Strada made in Italy that is a work of art w/ tooled lugs smartly painted & Campy Record all round. I think it is mid 80s but can't find much info. What’s in your garage?
 

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1971 Schwinn Sports Tourer

venus said:
Tell me about the oldest road bike you have & what makes it worth keeping. At a local bike shop I bought a magnificent pearl white Torpado Super Strada made in Italy that is a work of art w/ tooled lugs smartly painted & Campy Record all round. I think it is mid 80s but can't find much info. What’s in your garage?
More than a nostalgia piece, it's a great quality, virtually indestructable, nice riding bike. I have 5 bikes ane ride this one the most. I've never ridden a large-framed bike (26 inch or 66 cm) that comes close to it's ride, stability, and stiffness. I don't care about the 30 lbs it weighs. When I first started ridng back in the 70's I had a Schwinn Continental while my best friend had a Super Sport. I finally one-upped him. The Sports Tourer was the top-of-the-line, filet brazed Schwinn. I look down and see the Schwinn logo and 30 years of age slips away. Schwinn--for the young at heart.
 

· Lizzie will ride free
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A mid '70s Motobecane Grand Jubilee fixed gear conversion. It has fenders, so it gets a ton of use for 6-8 months of the year in Seattle. Some 531 tubes and a B-17. Really nice ride. Oh, and the saddle costs almost as much as the rest of the bike. Oh, and the saddle didn't cost too much. :)
 

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I have a '68 Urago that I bought new. It has repainted but retains the original Neuvo Record epuiptment with Cinelli stem and 65 bars and Unica Nitor saddle. Although I don't ride this every day I do take it out often putting a couple hundred miles a year on it.
 

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venus said:
Tell me about the oldest road bike you have & what makes it worth keeping. At a local bike shop I bought a magnificent pearl white Torpado Super Strada made in Italy that is a work of art w/ tooled lugs smartly painted & Campy Record all round. I think it is mid 80s but can't find much info. What’s in your garage?
1976 Keith Lippy custom road bike. 68cm R531 frame. Found the frame on eBay for $52. Resto-modded it with a combination of XT, 105 and NOS parts. It's got a cheesy rattlecan, backyard paint job, but a retrogrouch buddy is making some reproduction Lippy decals. Once I get those, I'll send it out for proper paint.

- FBB
 

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Early to mid-'80s Trek 620 tourer converted to singlespeed. It's light, comfortable, nimble and fun to ride, plus it's lugged steel--my main bike for years, and when I replaced it, it wasn't worth selling. I converted to SS with a BMX freewheel and a $1 spacer, about 14 bucks total.
BTW, I envy the poster with the '70s Motobecane Gran Jubilee. I had one of those for about 10 years until I destroyed it in a massive crash. Did my first century as well as a lot of other milestones on it. It's still on my top 3 list.
 

· Ti me up
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venus said:
Tell me about the oldest road bike you have & what makes it worth keeping. At a local bike shop I bought a magnificent pearl white Torpado Super Strada made in Italy that is a work of art w/ tooled lugs smartly painted & Campy Record all round. I think it is mid 80s but can't find much info. What’s in your garage?
Mid-80s Torelli Corsa Strada. One of their lower-end models for the time, but still a very nice riding steel frame. Mainly my trainer bike now, and has been slated for a SS/fixie conversion for going on two years now. I'll get around to it one of these days. :)
 

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1978 Viscount Sebring

Bought it right before I started college, took it with me and found out that riding a bike on campus was kinda impractical as everyone walked to class unless you lived fairly far off campus. Probably has less than 500 miles on the frame, it sat a long time. It was not a super expensive bike for the time, but it had features that I felt were a must; lugged steel, DT shifters, center pull brakes, relatively light weight for it's time. Rides like a caddy, soaking up bumps etc. Even though the paint was in fairly good condition i had it powdercoated a few years ago and painted the head and seat tube vanilla and the PC is orange. Lined the lugs with gold paint. Did some decal stripping found at a hobby store.

The bike has undergone some upgrades, I recently put on a used Ultegra triple drivetrain and NOS Shimano 600 brake levers, a Brooks saddle and fluted micro adjust post. Plan is to outfit it with new hammered Honjo fenders, a rack and pannier type leather saddle bags and use it as a tourer/commuter bike.

Further history of this bike was I used it as a stationary trainer after index shifting came on the market, then I gave it away to a charity. I found out about a year later that the charity had no use for the bike so I went and rescued it and that was when the restoration bug got me and I started a full restoration to far better than original. Obtained a set of 32h 27" Wolber Alpine rims from a guy in Scotland (very rare find) and laced them to a set of 600 hubs I had, it now has a great wheelset. I guess the reason I keep it is that it probably has little value to even fewer people but i like the way it fits and rides. I would never get out of it what I put into it money wise and it's condition is next to new for a bike that old. I still have alot of miles to ride that old lug.
 

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1975 Raleigh Super Course MK II. I bought it new, rode it through my college years and for a few years after. It hung in the garage since then till 2 years ago. Got it down and overhauled it. I don't ride it a lot because I really like index shifting. But every time I get on it I realize what a sweet ride it is.
 

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Don't know

In 1972, I bought a used true 10-speed Falcon at Bicycleville at Pico and Lincoln in Santa Monica for $80. Someone had brought the bike to the shoppe for refurbishing and a new paint job. So, how often does a bicycle need painting? That's the only clue as to its age. The person had left a $135 deposit (in 1972 dollars); he never returned. The owner of Bicycleville told me it was mine for $80. That's 34 years ago. I had it repainted in 1985 in Rockville, MD. So, if it needs painting every 13 years, subtract 13 years from 1972, and maybe the bike is from the 1961 vintage. It is like a fine wine. Thousands and thousands of miles later in Canada, USA, and Mexico and a shattered hip from a bicycle vs. bicycle crash and a tracheotomy from a bicycle vs. car door spectacular, it is every bit as much of me as a member of my family is. It's my Palm Springs ride. I have a 1990 Cannondale R2000 for my Los Angeles wheels. I have 9,500 miles on the Cannondale and counting. I have no idea the miles on the Falcon. In the early days,
I didn't "keep score."
 

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My "oldest" sounds pathetically inexperienced next to these others--I have a late '80s Bianchi Eros, one of the early Taiwan-made Superset bikes. I wouldn't use it for go-fast rides, but it's a plush all-day rig in fine mechanical shape, although the cosmetics are getting shabby. It's going to be the next big project, getting torn down to the frame, paint stripped (except for the lugs), repainted with the tubes contrasting with the lugs, and then rebuilt with a moustache bar, either barcons or d/t shifters, a dynamo hub and lighting system and various oddments.
 

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A 1970's era Puch. It is a tank, indestructible, never upgraded. The former owners of the house I bought left it in the barn. It is what got me started in road biking after having torn my achilles tendon. I continued riding it for about 5 years before upgrading to a new Trek last year. The Puch had 10 speeds, of which maybe I could actually shift to 7 of them, with the original derailleurs (LBS said he couldn't adjust it anymore because the springs were shot). It did not have any cam locks on it, all hex bolts, and it had a kickstand. The friction levers were on the center post, so when I stood up, my knee could hit the levers and chage gears on me.

So this baby not only ws in my garage, it WAS my main bike until last year. I can't part with it, it is such an archaeological piece.
 

· uhhhh, what?
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mid 70's bertin c39, my dad's bike for years.

a full-on race bike, he commuted on it for years until he crashed it mid-winter and totalled both the bike and his shoulder. he had surgery, i ended up with a pile of parts in trade for one of my old mountain bikes. as i tore that baby down i was amazed, he was well on the way to riding that sucker into the ground, it was pretty much completely trashed. and his wreck was so violent he bent almost every tube on that frame. the steerer was about the only straight piece left. my buddy has a frame table, we spent an entire afternoon massaging that frame back into shape, tube by tube. then he did braze-ons; tt cable guides, shifter bosses, pump peg, new lowered rear brake arch. the frame had a campagnolo clamp-on bb cable guide, if you've got one of those you're morally obligated to flaunt it, so it's still got that. sent it up to spectrum powder works in c. springs for a gorgeous molteni orange paint job, then built it back up with the most eclectic mix of parts imaginable. campagnolo, zeus, mavic, suntour, shimano, cinelli, SR, sachs, stronglight, regina, selle italia, kool-stop, ritchey, continental.

it's my daily driver, unless it looks like rain, in which case i haul out my cross-check, which wears full fenders year 'round for just this application. the bertin gets ridden about 150 days a year, every year. a solid machine, yet very fast and lots of fun.
 

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1975 Gios Torino

I bought it direct from the importer, Cortina Cycles, and picked it up from their NYC West Side operation, driving down from Boston. Probably has about 75k miles on it now. One of the earlier bikes to have a 126mm rear triangle and clearances requiring short reach brakes. Repainted by CycleArts in 1985 and due for a complete resto at some point. I had in storage for 6 years when living in London, rode it a bit upon returning to the States but it's now back again in storage after moving to China. Well, at some point I will get it restored. I have all the Campag Nuovo Record stuff including short reach caplipers with block lettering and flat QR's along with panto'd Gios chain ring and seat post. The stem, well, I'm still looking.

The last picture is from the factory promotional sheet which I donated to Classic Rendesvous who cleaned up the creases for their site.
 

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addendum to "Don't Know"

Bill Mendell said:
In 1972, I bought a used true 10-speed Falcon at Bicycleville at Pico and Lincoln in Santa Monica for $80. Someone had brought the bike to the shoppe for refurbishing and a new paint job. So, how often does a bicycle need painting? That's the only clue as to its age. The person had left a $135 deposit (in 1972 dollars); he never returned. The owner of Bicycleville told me it was mine for $80. That's 34 years ago. I had it repainted in 1985 in Rockville, MD. So, if it needs painting every 13 years, subtract 13 years from 1972, and maybe the bike is from the 1961 vintage. It is like a fine wine. Thousands and thousands of miles later in Canada, USA, and Mexico and a shattered hip from a bicycle vs. bicycle crash and a tracheotomy from a bicycle vs. car door spectacular, it is every bit as much of me as a member of my family is. It's my Palm Springs ride. I have a 1990 Cannondale R2000 for my Los Angeles wheels. I have 9,500 miles on the Cannondale and counting. I have no idea the miles on the Falcon. In the early days,
I didn't "keep score."
I may have to disqualify myself. I do not keep any of my bicycles in the garage. The Falcon is at the foot of the bed in the master bedroom in Palm Springs; it would like to get in bed with me; but, Alpha and Bravo, my two cats, have territorial rights; and my Cannondale (and my wife's Trek 2300) hang from the wall (took down the Russells and the Remingtons), as pieces of art, in the living room in Los Angeles when we are not riding them. However, my wife's Centurion is hanging from the wall in the garage in
Palm Springs--I think that's the last place I saw her, also (hanging from the wall).
I met her on the bikepath on Memorial Day week-end.
She could out ride me. Or maybe it was just my view from behind?
 

· Government Mule
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Early 70's Chiorda I keep in Mother's garage which I use to cruise or run errands in the old neighborhood, and I continue to daydream about converting it to fixie/singlespeed, since it is currently a five speed with the single chainring. I'll be riding my mid 80's Schwinn Letour Luxe over there today to cut her grass. The Schwinn is the oldest in my garage if you don't count the three speed. I tend to form these attachments and can't let go.
 
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