Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 20 of 27 Posts

·
I CAME I SAW I CONQUERED
Joined
·
181 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just bought this new ride ohhh about 3 weeks ago and a few days
after getting it home I saw the rear wheel is not centered between
the chainstays. It's about 4.5mm clearance on the drive side and
maybe 2mm on the nondrive side. Other than it looking bad from
the rear is it worth getting all worked up about? I'm picky and
really thank I could have saved the $3000 and rode my old
beater bike if this was what I am getting from a new "Ti" Litespeed!

What are your thoughts?


Thanks - VÈÑÍ VÍÐÌ VÌÇÍ ™
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8 Posts
Test by putting the wheel in backwards ...

see if the wheel dish is the problem. If the wheel is offset to the other side, the dish is off. If the wheel offset is still on the same side, the frame is out of alignment. On a new Litespeed I would complain and get it fixed.
 

·
I CAME I SAW I CONQUERED
Joined
·
181 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Tried all the above already......

IFRider said:
see if the wheel dish is the problem. If the wheel is offset to the other side, the dish is off. If the wheel offset is still on the same side, the frame is out of alignment. On a new Litespeed I would complain and get it fixed.

I think the problem is that the dropout on the drive side is a bit too wide ( if I
pull back on the qr then tighten it the wheel is only about 1mm out of center )
whereas the dropout on the nondrive side fits very well.

With the wheel installed and the tension on the RD backed off w/my hand
the wheel is kindasorta near center but when I ease the tension back on
the wheel is pulled over.

I'm not pleased w/this matter at all to tell the truth.


Thanks guys - VÈÑÍ VÍÐÌ VÌÇÍ ™
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
71 Posts
I have the same deal with mine!

IFRider said:
see if the wheel dish is the problem. If the wheel is offset to the other side, the dish is off. If the wheel offset is still on the same side, the frame is out of alignment. On a new Litespeed I would complain and get it fixed.
After I read this post I was curious and went to go look at my bike and crap if mine isn't the exact same way. I was super mad. My question is what if it's the dish? Is that expensive to fix? Or if the frame is out of alignment is that pricey as well to fix? I'll check mine in the morning with the method you suggested..........Justin :eek:
 

·
I CAME I SAW I CONQUERED
Joined
·
181 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
What Litespeed frame do you have?.....

mtnbikenc1979 said:
After I read this post I was curious and went to go look at my bike and crap if mine isn't the exact same way. I was super mad. My question is what if it's the dish? Is that expensive to fix? Or if the frame is out of alignment is that pricey as well to fix? I'll check mine in the morning with the method you suggested..........Justin :eek:

Just wondering? Mine is the Solano 2004.

Thanks - VÈÑÍ VÍÐÌ VÌÇÍ ™.
 

·
HANK
Joined
·
144 Posts
Litespeed

Have you checked with Litespeed yet? I have had 2 Litespeeds and my experience has been that they are extremely responsive to quality control items. If it is not the frame they may have some suggestions for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Dish

If your wheel is out of dish, it is not hard to fix. When building a wheel you want to make sure that the rim is centered with the hub. To check dish you usually use a dishing tool/gauge. This is the best meathod. Using the frame would work, but if the stays are asymetrical you may get an error. The LBS would be able to check dish in a minute or two. To fix "dish" (centering the rim to the hub) you just need to tighten all the spokes on one side of the rim and loosen all the spokes on the other side. I suggest you go to the Sheldon Brown - wheel building section. He give a very good tutorial on wheel building, that includes dishing. I've used this to build many sets of wheels with great results. I don't know the web address, but I'm sure someone on this site has it.

gtown
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
78 Posts
Check the dishing first.

As Gtown said you need to check the dishing of the rear wheel first. If it is out then the wheel has not been built very well and needs re-dishing - or even rebuilding depending on it's age and use.
 

·
Ironbutt
Joined
·
203 Posts
Probably wheel dish

Most likely, the rear wheel is out of dish. This is really common on production, machine built wheels. This is one of the things that your bike shop should have checked before they gave the bike to you, particularly a high end bike like a Litespeed. To check the dish yourself, just remove the rear wheel and reinstall it with the cogs on the left, rather than the right. Just drape the chain over bearing housing of the hub with it off of the chainring. If the wheel is now closer to the other chainstay, you know that the wheel dish is off. And that's most likely the problem. In over 30 years of cycling, I have never seen a machine built wheel that has been perfectly dished.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,601 Posts
You should check the Mavic high-end wheels then. They're perfectly dished.

BTW, if your frame is out of alignment this is the guy who fixes it at Litespeed:

<IMG SRC="https://www.slowtwitch.com/images/litespeed6.jpg">
 

·
Ironbutt
Joined
·
203 Posts
Funny that you should say that!

divve said:
You should check the Mavic high-end wheels then. They're perfectly dished.

BTW, if your frame is out of alignment this is the guy who fixes it at Litespeed:

<IMG SRC="https://www.slowtwitch.com/images/litespeed6.jpg">
About a month ago, a woman in my cycling club sprung for a new pair of Ksyrium SSC SL wheels. She mentioned that they didn't seem to be quite right in her frame. (Waterford 1200, so I think it's probably straight) I put my dishing tool to work, and sure enough, the rear wheel was about 1.5 mm out of perfect dish. Back to the LBS where she bought them! A day later, after the touch of the master wheelbuilder's hand, they were right.
 

·
Every little counts...
Joined
·
3,924 Posts
Axle or something could be bent...

Okay, maybe not on your wheels, but it could happen that the drop-out seats on the hub is bent. Try turning the axle 90* and re-seating the wheel.

You say it is straighter when pulling back on the wheel? Well, when everyone had campagnolo horizontal dropouts that was the way to go. Those screws where there for a reason! WHat about weighting the bicycle before closing the QR?

Just thoughts, but I'd send it back.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
240 Posts
Vital Information

divve said:
You should check the Mavic high-end wheels then. They're perfectly dished.

BTW, if your frame is out of alignment this is the guy who fixes it at Litespeed:

<IMG SRC="https://www.slowtwitch.com/images/litespeed6.jpg">
As other writers have suggested, the issue of correct dishing must be established. Simply flip the wheel over and see if the same thing happens. If the wheel is dished correctly - and there's never any guarantee - then the frame is out of alignment.

One other important note: if this is an Aluminum Litespeed, that frame was NOT fabricated in a US plant. Litespeed has outsourced that work to a company in Taiwan.

I hope this is not news to the people who are buying Aluminum Lightspeeds.

Plus Vite...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,601 Posts
I've had some weird Mavic manufacturer defects, including a CrossMax rear wheel that was perfectly true and dished on a out of round rear hub. Couldn't mount a disc rotor on it cause it was so warped. I don't know what to say...in my experience my wheels were always very true and dished excellently.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
629 Posts
The chain pulls the wheel

This is not too surprising. The drivetrain naturally has tension on it and when the wheel is not secured by the quck release, it will pull the wheel out of alignment (especially if the chain is in the smallest cog; where it usually is set when removing/installing a wheel). If your wheel is properly dished and your axl isn't bent, try mounting the wheel without engaging the chain on the cogs. Or take the chain off the chainrings and let it hang on the bottom bracket shell.

Is the wheel still out of alignment when fully seated?
 

·
Arrogant roadie.....
Joined
·
4,232 Posts
Machine-built wheel horror stories

Here's a story I remember from a few years back. don't know if it's true or not, but sounds about right.

A guy named Joe (don't remember the real name) bought a wheel that was machine-built in China. It was a 36 spoke wheel. He took it home, put it on his bike, and it was straight and true. When he rode it, though, he noticed an unusual clicking noise, one that he recognized as sounding like a loose spoke.

After checking it, he found that one spoke was completely slack, yet the wheel was true. It looked like the wheel-building machine had completely missed on spoke, and the nipple was just hand-tight, nothing more.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
70 Posts
Do your dropouts have limit screws?

HANK said:
Have you checked with Litespeed yet? I have had 2 Litespeeds and my experience has been that they are extremely responsive to quality control items. If it is not the frame they may have some suggestions for you.
If so they may need to be adjusted. This may only be on steel bikes, I am not sure.
 
1 - 20 of 27 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top