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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm in need of new wheels and all roads point to tubulars. I have the DA 7800 now, but they have been banged up and are not the lightest wheels out there, I love them, but ready to make the jump.

Here are my thoughts and concerns:

-- Can't tubulars roll off, especially when it's hot, ala Beloki?
-- If you flat out on a long ride, what do you do, bring a bulky spare, but then you can't glue it properly and have to ride with a semi-attached tire?
-- I don't tend to flat, but I hear tubulars rarely flat and you never have to worry about flats in the rain or pinch flats, so all this worry about flatting is a rare occasion, then you just use something like Vittoria's Pit Stop?
-- Is there a performance advantage, they are lighter and corner better, right?

Any feedback would be much appreciated. Oh, and has anyone heard about the new DA 7801 semi tubulars, no glue right?
 

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I switched to tubies and then returned to clinchers.

Answers:
-Tubies can roll off but it is often due to other factors. Beloki's roll-off was not the cause of his crash. It came off after he had lost control.
Many roll-offs are due to a flat tire that the rider has not realized yet. Go around the corner with low pressure and the tire rolls.
-You have to carry a full spare tubular tire. You glue it ahead of time, fold it up and put it in a bag or under your seat. There are a few products to seal tubular flats.
-Flats are less common. No pinch-flats with tubulars. You still have to watch for sharp objects. I wouldn't say they are less likely to flat in the rain. that makes no sense to me.
-A tubular wheel/tire combo is almost always lighter. Easily if you are using carbon rims. I found ride quality depended on the tire choice. Conti and Tufos felt similar to clinchers. I preferred Vittoria Corsa CX tires. They made a noticeable difference. The road felt like butta!!!

I rode them for thousands of miles but eventually got rid of them. A tubular system does have some inherent hassles. When it was time for new wheels, I went back to clincher.
 

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Biknben has answered your questions. I would add that punctures in the rain are a problem with all tires. The water acts as a lubricant and any sharp object can puncture a tire more easily.

I prefer the ride of a tubular tire and have been riding on them for over 20 years. I weigh 185 lbs and found that I was getting pinch flats with clinchers if the tire pressure was under 130 psi on a 23 mm tire. I ride 21 mm Conti Sprinters at 100 psi which gives a much better ride than the higher pressure clinchers.
 

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You have to ask yourself a few questions (and answer truthfully)
1) Can I glue up a tubie, so that it will stay on, in high speed turns.
2) Can I repair an $80 tubie that has a small leak.
3) Do I plan to just race on them
4) Do I plan to use them to JRA
5) Why do I feel that I "need" them.
6) Do I realize that a "properly" glued on tubie is a real Bit*h to get off.
 

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JimP said:
I weigh 185 lbs and found that I was getting pinch flats with clinchers if the tire pressure was under 130 psi on a 23 mm tire.
Seriously? What kinda hell-on-earth roads do you ride?

I'm same weight, ride 105psi on clinchers, and despite hitting hard edges pretty regularly, I have no problems with pinch flats. I'm not doubting you, just saying my experience has been different.

I've ridden tubies, not in the last 20 years though. For me, not worth the hassle, but I don't race. Most folks I know that do ride tubies only race 'em - too much hassle and expense for training and cruising use.

The disadvantages go away when you race - if you do flat, it's either support or you're out of the race. You'll not repair tubies or clinchers quick enough to matter in a race.
 

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If you want to try a pretty light (1400 grams) set that have fresh Conti Sprinters glued by an expert wrench at the LBS. PM me, they are for sale. I really am not good enough to appreciate the improvement in ride or cornering.

American Classic Hubs
Velocity Escape Rims
DT double butted spokes
Continental Sprinters (with about 200 miles on them)
 

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unless you're a sponsored pro who has people to deal with tubies or like messing around with sewing needles and glue I can't imagine there is enough performance advantage to bother with tubulars. A good set of clinchers is so much less hassle.
 

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My take: for JRA the simplicity of clinchers can't be beat. (except for cross, but that's another story)

For racing, tubies are lighter, and you get lighter/more aero rim choices in tubular only.

I train on Reflex Ceramic 32-hole clinchers almost 95% of the time, but race on tubies almost 100% of the time. (track and cross)

They're not THAT hard to mount properly.
They can be a bear to get off, but realistically, how often is that?
They ride nicer.
IME Cheap tubies don't ride as nice as nice clinchers.
IME Nice tubies ride nicer than nice clinchers.
S22 Tufos are bulletproof, but ride like shite...

HTH,

M
 

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LukeVelo said:
I'm in need of new wheels and all roads point to tubulars. I have the DA 7800 now, but they have been banged up and are not the lightest wheels out there, I love them, but ready to make the jump.

Here are my thoughts and concerns:

-- Can't tubulars roll off, especially when it's hot, ala Beloki?
-- If you flat out on a long ride, what do you do, bring a bulky spare, but then you can't glue it properly and have to ride with a semi-attached tire?
-- I don't tend to flat, but I hear tubulars rarely flat and you never have to worry about flats in the rain or pinch flats, so all this worry about flatting is a rare occasion, then you just use something like Vittoria's Pit Stop?
-- Is there a performance advantage, they are lighter and corner better, right?

Any feedback would be much appreciated. Oh, and has anyone heard about the new DA 7801 semi tubulars, no glue right?
I have been riding tubulars exclusively for over 20 years. I love them and I get my tires for less $$ than most high end clinchers.

- the Beloki crash was discussed extensively in the Pro Cycling Forum and I think we came to the conclusion he was riding clinchers.
- one of the disadvantages of tubulars is that if you flat and change the tire you have to ride with a semi-glued on tire for the rest of the ride.
- no pinch flats but hey if you hit a nail or a thorn you will flat.
- tubulars are lighter. I think you get more positive road feel with them. Meaning you can feel the grip on the road. So yeah you can probably corner better. They accelerate up a hill better because of the lightness.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
After seeing the Beloki crash, again, and again, and again thanks to OLN reminding me how great of a cyclecross rider Lance is, it looks no matter what tire he was riding, it would have rolled. But it's hard to see that listening to Bob Roll go on, and on, and on about Lance. And is it me, but does he look more amped up for the TDF? Almost to the point of unwatchable, he needs to lay off the cafe au laits. And while I'm on a Roll, have you listened to the commentarty him and Al Trautwig do later in the day, painful. You really appreciate hearing Paul and Phil after those two.

But back to the subject at hand, had anyone heard or seen a tubular rolling off, if so, what were the circumstances?
 

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The valve stem

LukeVelo said:
I'm in need of new wheels and all roads point to tubulars. I have the DA 7800 now, but they have been banged up and are not the lightest wheels out there, I love them, but ready to make the jump.

Here are my thoughts and concerns:

-- Can't tubulars roll off, especially when it's hot, ala Beloki?
-- If you flat out on a long ride, what do you do, bring a bulky spare, but then you can't glue it properly and have to ride with a semi-attached tire?
-- I don't tend to flat, but I hear tubulars rarely flat and you never have to worry about flats in the rain or pinch flats, so all this worry about flatting is a rare occasion, then you just use something like Vittoria's Pit Stop?
-- Is there a performance advantage, they are lighter and corner better, right?

Any feedback would be much appreciated. Oh, and has anyone heard about the new DA 7801 semi tubulars, no glue right?
Agree with much of what has been said; may I add:
when I ride over a rock in the road (having little choice due to traffic conditions) on that part of the tire where the valve stem is, it always flats. I know it the moment it happens.
As for the cost of the tubies, I rationalize that if I get in enough miles, price is not a factor.
However, my significant others remind me that I could have purchased new wheels for what three or four tubies cost me. But, what do they know??? Stay glued to the tubie.
 

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I'd say it depends upon where you live & the amount of flats that happen in your area. I used to live/race in WI - and didn't own clinchers - sponsored - so that kept costs down - but I got very few flats riding many 10K seasons.

In DEN - there are so many fricking thorns in the fall, it'd be stupid to ride tubies here. Even w/ new tires (4000s) flats are not uncommon - maybe 1 every 500 miles - that'd get pricy at $60 per flat
 

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LukeVelo said:
had anyone heard or seen a tubular rolling off, if so, what were the circumstances?
I was a spectator at the finish line of a race. A rider was sprinting up to the line when he crashed. Once the dust had settled, he walked off the road with his bike in hand. The front tubular tire was only secured to the Corima rim by the valve. The tire was still fully inflated. It was very strange.

The are as many ways to glue a tubular as there are tubular users. If you take your time and do it right, you should have no issues. I know it was a pain in the a$$ to get my tires off.

You may want to start a new thread for gluing methods. :eek:
 

· naranjito
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a quote from suart o'grady in cyclingnews.com this morning: 'About eight ks from the finish we came into this roundabout and I punctured. We were doing warp speed and the tyre rolled off the rim. I felt like Mick Doohan as the bike kicked sideways and I had to ride it like a bucking bronco'
 

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I chose Tubies

I found the system to be lighter but gluing was a pain (mavic 570 hubs, GEL280 rims and revolution spokes made for a 1400g wheelset! With a newer hubset could shave another 100 grams I think). So, I found tubular rim tape and that solved my gluing problems! I'm in Japan so the stuff I use is made by Miyata but brands like TUFO and others should be available elsewhere.

Tires: I paid big money for Corsa CX and wasnt that impressed. The thing I noticed most was how much pressure they would bleed over a short amount of time. Could be due to the latex tube inside. The would be down 40-50 PSI by the next day. So I went to cheapo Vittoria rally or nouvo pros and dont sweat it now as the tread is the same, width is the same, they hold pressure longer, and at 10-15 bucks for a tire, if I flat then its about the same price as a reasonable tube. I also find tubies to be more forgiving with pressure. I can ride them with about 1/2 ro 2/3 pressure and not worry. I wouldnt do that with clinchers.

Flats: I carry a spare tire and then pressure fit it and scurry home with my tail between my legs while taking it really easy. Not ideal but better than not getting home at all. I always carry a tire lever (plastic) to help pry the tire off.

TakmanJapan
 

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takmanjapan said:
I found the system to be lighter but gluing was a pain (mavic 570 hubs, GEL280 rims and revolution spokes made for a 1400g wheelset! With a newer hubset could shave another 100 grams I think). So, I found tubular rim tape and that solved my gluing problems! I'm in Japan so the stuff I use is made by Miyata but brands like TUFO and others should be available elsewhere.

Tires: I paid big money for Corsa CX and wasnt that impressed. The thing I noticed most was how much pressure they would bleed over a short amount of time. Could be due to the latex tube inside. The would be down 40-50 PSI by the next day. So I went to cheapo Vittoria rally or nouvo pros and dont sweat it now as the tread is the same, width is the same, they hold pressure longer, and at 10-15 bucks for a tire, if I flat then its about the same price as a reasonable tube. I also find tubies to be more forgiving with pressure. I can ride them with about 1/2 ro 2/3 pressure and not worry. I wouldnt do that with clinchers.

Flats: I carry a spare tire and then pressure fit it and scurry home with my tail between my legs while taking it really easy. Not ideal but better than not getting home at all. I always carry a tire lever (plastic) to help pry the tire off.

TakmanJapan
yeah, that bleed down is the latex tubes. Nothing to worry about 'cept the hassle of pumping em up every ride or so.

M
 
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