Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 20 of 33 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,197 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Can we lose the point of cycling in our constant pursuit of newer and better bikes? Are the love of cycling and the love of bikes one in the same or can they become two different things at some point? If so, what is that point and does it matter?

Why You Only Need One Bicycle | Bicycling
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,038 Posts
I started cycling in 1971 and have never owned more then one bicycle at a time. Over the years I have found myself with 2 bikes because enough parts were around to make a build but I always gave it away or sold it.

Currently my bike is a standard road bike, it will accept fenders and my H+ archtype rims make my Michelin Pro 4 Endurance tires 27.5mm wide. I ride road, motel touring and we have one mountain road (gravel, dirt, potholes and rocks with a river in the winter). I just ride it and everything on my one set of wheels. I always have an extra set of wheels which are always the last set that I retired. I build my own wheels and do 100% of my own maintenance.

My friend races cyclocross, rides road, gravel, tours and mountain biking. He has 9 bikes and that works for him and I have 1 bike and that works for me.

I do not upgrade. Sometimes I replace a bike after 10 years and my last bike went 30 years. I have owned my current custom made steel bike for 3 years (made in the USA with Columbus Spirit OS tubing) and expect it to take me down the road until the day I no longer can swing a leg over. I expect to ride 5000 miles this year, last year I made 4460 miles. Miles measured via Garmin and posted to Strava.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9,658 Posts
I didn't read the article but having bought a CX bike recently I'd agree that one bike can pretty much do it all up until the point you'd need a mountain bike.

Wheels, tires and cassettes are a different story.
 

·
Doesn't like subtitles
Joined
·
3,808 Posts
I have 9 bikes (I think); the newest is from 2005. The most recently bought was made in 1989. It's not always about the pursuit of the latest and greatest.

But yes you can only ride one at a time.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,792 Posts
Are the love of cycling and the love of bikes one in the same or can they become two different things at some point? If so, what is that point and does it matter?
Yeah.

Some use a bike as transportation. From here to there, no enjoyment necessary.

Some ride the bike for enjoyment, whether for transportation or just to ride, it's all enjoyable.

Some like to have bicycles, don't need to ride them but enjoy having them.

It's the "Trinity", but with bicycles.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
3,297 Posts
That is the sort of long-winded but insightful and in-depth reporting I really appreciate.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
44 Posts
It depends where you live and what type of riding and most importantly the budget. For me at least two. One for bad weather or winter ride (rain bike) and the other one is for road racing or pleasant ride. I put fender on my rain bike. It rains a lot in Seattle and people do ride in the rain, so having fender is a courtesy one. My rain bike (Roubaix disc brake) is always wet all the time in winter time. I don't want to ruin my race bike in the bad weather. But if you live in Arizona then you could probably have only one road bike.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,471 Posts
It depends where you live and what type of riding and most importantly the budget. For me at least two. One for bad weather or winter ride (rain bike) and the other one is for road racing or pleasant ride. I put fender on my rain bike. It rains a lot in Seattle and people do ride in the rain, so having fender is a courtesy one. My rain bike (Roubaix disc brake) is always wet all the time in winter time. I don't want to ruin my race bike in the bad weather. But if you live in Arizona then you could probably have only one road bike.
Right on! One nice race bike and one backup/winter/rain bike with fenders and at least 28C tires.

Manufacturers don't put fender eyelets or enough clearance for 25C tires on their race bikes, so that winter bike has far fewer available options. So we have Grand Fondo bikes that rider sits upright, under-geared cyclocross bikes with those brake that jut out to the side, and knobby tires. Whatever happened to those "touring bikes?" They're as rare as hens teeth at the local LBS.

For one bike to do everything, it needs clearance for 32C tires, 52/39-12-28 gearing, and fender eyelets. The only bikes I've seen set up like this are custom builds. :confused: Why is that? Manufacturers must want us to have more than one bike! :idea:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,792 Posts
Right on! One nice race bike and one backup/winter/rain bike with fenders and at least 28C tires.

Manufacturers don't put fender eyelets or enough clearance for 25C tires on their race bikes, so that winter bike has far fewer available options. So we have Grand Fondo bikes that rider sits upright, under-geared cyclocross bikes with those brake that jut out to the side, and knobby tires. Whatever happened to those "touring bikes?" They're as rare as hens teeth at the local LBS.

For one bike to do everything, it needs clearance for 32C tires, 52/39-12-28 gearing, and fender eyelets. The only bikes I've seen set up like this are custom builds. :confused: Why is that? Manufacturers must want us to have more than one bike! :idea:
What's the c in 23c, 25c and 32c represent?

As far as your bike with fender and tire clearance, eyelets and gearing needing to be custom, that's not necessarily true; mine is 650b but they can also be had in 700c wheel size. c as in wheel size not tire size.
Special order but not custom. Not a "touring bike" either.

Mine is 650b x 42mm but as I said they can also be had in 700c x 28\32mm.

Bicycle tire Bicycle frame Tire Bicycle wheel Bicycle wheel rim
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,695 Posts
I have two road bikes and a fold-up Dahon. The fold-up is extremely convenient for commuting around the city. I never sought out to have two road bikes but when I got the c-59 didn't see the point in getting rid of the Trek. Sometimes its nice having the 2nd road bike such as when the C-59 is in service , getting packed for a trip or if the roads are bad and I want to protect the good bike. It's also nice having a bike you don't have to worry so much about.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,471 Posts
I have 9 bikes (I think); the newest is from 2005. The most recently bought was made in 1989. It's not always about the pursuit of the latest and greatest.

But yes you can only ride one at a time.
How many of those 9 bikes do you ride regularly? I have 6 bikes but I mostly only ride 2-3 of them.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
7,161 Posts
I don't need any bikes, but I have 5 at the moment because I like bikes and like riding bikes.
 

·
Doesn't like subtitles
Joined
·
3,808 Posts
How many of those 9 bikes do you ride regularly? I have 6 bikes but I mostly only ride 2-3 of them.
Depends on your definition of regularly. Over the course of a year they will all get ridden on multiple occasions. I have a time trial bike which, now, sees the least use, but still fun to pull out and go fast on. I have 2 main road bikes which get about 50% of the mileage. 4 vintage bikes which I rotate through in no particular order ( hmmm, today feels like a Francesco Moser day).

All of the bikes have different rides qualities and can make the same old route feel fresh.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,471 Posts
What's the c in 23c, 25c and 32c represent?

As far as your bike with fender and tire clearance, eyelets and gearing needing to be custom, that's not necessarily true; mine is 650b but they can also be had in 700c wheel size. c as in wheel size not tire size.
Special order but not custom. Not a "touring bike" either.

Mine is 650b x 42mm but as I said they can also be had in 700c x 28\32mm.

View attachment 312411
Go fast bikes generally aren't equipped with fender eyelets, IME, you know, the ones with drop handlebars.

That pix looks like a Rivendell! Brother Grant would be the one to put eyelets on his frames, if anyone would. :thumbsup: Nice rig! Sure looks like a touring bike, though. Long chain stays, upright positioning, long wheel base., plenty of clearance for fat tires and fenders. That's not the bike you're going to race in the weekend crit, is it? :nono:

Now don't be a snob. The Conti Gatorskins I run are marked "700 x 28C," or "700 x 25C," as every tire I've run for the last 35 years. "MM" may be the current hip nomenclature, but fact is, it's seldom accurate! So I don't use that nomenclature. Sorry for not being politically correct. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,792 Posts
Go fast bikes generally aren't equipped with fender eyelets, IME, you know, the ones with drop handlebars.

That pix looks like a Rivendell! Brother Grant would be the one to put eyelets on his frames, if anyone would. :thumbsup: Nice rig!

Now don't be a snob. The Conti Gatorskins I run are marked "700 x 28C," as every tire I've run for the last 35 years. "Mm" may be the current hip nomenclature, but fact is, it's seldom accurate! So I don't use that nomenclature. Sorry for not being politically correct. :D
Not a Rivendell.

As I understand it there were 700a, 700b and 700c wheel designations all to equal 700mm's diameter with tires mounted. Now a 700c rim is 622mm dia which would mean that a tire would need to be 39mm to be an honest 700c tire. I guess 700c x 39c. Probably just called a 700c tire.

And since the tires we use are measured in mm's and we'd be hard pressed to find a 700a or 700b rim and tires for same, it seems pretty archaic to use a designation that is mired in history.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
27,471 Posts
Not a Rivendell.

As I understand it there were 700a, 700b and 700c wheel designations all to equal 700mm's diameter with tires mounted. Now a 700c rim is 622mm dia which would mean that a tire would need to be 39mm to be an honest 700c tire. I guess 700c x 39c. Probably just called a 700c tire.

And since the tires we use are measured in mm's and we'd be hard pressed to find a 700a or 700b rim and tires for same, it seems pretty archaic to use a designation that is mired in history.
Thanks for reminding me of that 700A,B,C designation. Also interesting that, as Brother Grant mentions, 650s with 40mm tires have about the same clearance as 700s with skinnier tires. I've always found the 25 or 28C to tell me what clearance to expect as well as ride quality. I don't really care if one is 24 mm, another is 26 mm. So what? Casing, air pressure, vary the feel sufficiently, that exact mm measurements are really not necessary. Some digitally minded riders love to crunch numbers, though, a sign of the age. I'm hopelessly analogue. Riding a bike is an analogue experience for me. Always will be. Data is entirely secondary.
 
1 - 20 of 33 Posts
Top