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duh...
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bauerb said:
so I do my usual 30min moderate spin on the trainer last night, and since I had a few more minutes to kill, I was thinking about what to do. I remembered a post awhile back about pedaling with one leg as an exercise in pedaling technique. so I figured what the heck, I'll do 1min intervals alternating legs, and try to maintain a cadence of 85-90. well let me tell you, this was quite the eye opener. I first started and it immediately felt like I was pedaling ovals. kind of limping alongL slow through the 6-12 position, just cresting over through 12, then hard/fast down to six, etc. it was very awkward. I wear spd's so I thought: I need to smooth out the power by pulling through 6-12. that obviously helped alot, but now my hip flexors and hamstrings start burning. those 1 minute intervals all the sudden were very long.

I would say this: for anyone new to cycling, it can be very hard to grasp the concept of push/pull all the way around the pedal stroke when you are you 2 legs. its just too hard to isolate the 6-12 position on each leg. I plan to do alot more of these 1 leg intervals because I am so obviously in need of practicing. and BTW, powering through the last 15secs or so of each interval felt exactly the same as when I am mt. biking and riding at an impossibly slow cadence, trying to power up a steep technical pitch over rocks/roots whatever, wherever since you are pedaling so slow, all positions of the pedal stroke are vital. trainers are broing, so I think 1 legged intervals are a great use of time

you're ok... when most people first go to one-legged drills they feel like they are pedalling squares
 

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so I do my usual 30min moderate spin on the trainer last night, and since I had a few more minutes to kill, I was thinking about what to do. I remembered a post awhile back about pedaling with one leg as an exercise in pedaling technique. so I figured what the heck, I'll do 1min intervals alternating legs, and try to maintain a cadence of 85-90. well let me tell you, this was quite the eye opener. I first started and it immediately felt like I was pedaling ovals. kind of limping alongL slow through the 6-12 position, just cresting over through 12, then hard/fast down to six, etc. it was very awkward. I wear spd's so I thought: I need to smooth out the power by pulling through 6-12. that obviously helped alot, but now my hip flexors and hamstrings start burning. those 1 minute intervals all the sudden were very long.

I would say this: for anyone new to cycling, it can be very hard to grasp the concept of push/pull all the way around the pedal stroke when you are you 2 legs. its just too hard to isolate the 6-12 position on each leg. I plan to do alot more of these 1 leg intervals because I am so obviously in need of practicing. and BTW, powering through the last 15secs or so of each interval felt exactly the same as when I am mt. biking and riding at an impossibly slow cadence, trying to power up a steep technical pitch over rocks/roots whatever, wherever since you are pedaling so slow, all positions of the pedal stroke are vital. trainers are broing, so I think 1 legged intervals are a great use of time
 

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gastarbeiter
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sounds like a new twist. granted, one i'll never try, but original :)

i'm from the 'one leg, riding uphill to improve technique school' ;)
 

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Moderatus Puisne
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I've heard conflicting reports about the benefit of doing one-legged intervals for "training out muscle imbalance" or whatever.

The only reason I ride one-legged is to remove a leg-warmer or something.
 

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duh...
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Discussion Starter #5
Argentius said:
I've heard conflicting reports about the benefit of doing one-legged intervals for "training out muscle imbalance" or whatever.

The only reason I ride one-legged is to remove a leg-warmer or something.

I thought it was more to develop smoother pedalling? i.e., done with lower resistance, like easy gear or downhill/downwind
 

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1 legged...

FatTireFred said:
I thought it was more to develop smoother pedalling? i.e., done with lower resistance, like easy gear or downhill/downwind
1 legged stuff I think is a waste of your time. It doesn't follow the normal flow of how you would normally ride a bike does it? Not remotely. Try developing your "spin" with both legs as in how one normally rides. Then again, try to develop the old fitness then worry about the little things later on down the line.
 

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I prefer one handed intervals......

because they don't require a bike!
 

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One leg interval NOT a waste of time!

magnolialover said:
1 legged stuff I think is a waste of your time. It doesn't follow the normal flow of how you would normally ride a bike does it? Not remotely. Try developing your "spin" with both legs as in how one normally rides. Then again, try to develop the old fitness then worry about the little things later on down the line.
I strongly disagree for four major reasons-
1) Biking is an art form- I feel and appreciate the better form as I begin to attain it.
2) Good form puts more power to the pedals instead of fighting your body- your spedometer will appreciate it almost immediately
3) Riding with friends, smooth and predictable riding is what everyone wants.
4) Winter training is boring, boring, boring. One legged intervals break up the monotony. The longer you can train, the better you'll feel when you can hit the road.

I got rollers to break up my boring resistance trainer. It is a bit scary, you could crash if you don't respect the rollers. After a few weeks I got on the stationary trainer. It felt good. The one legged intervals-- WOW, wow! MUCH easier than I ever felt before. We had a patch of good weather, and when I hit the road, I could feel the difference, and it felt good.

My tip- rest the tip of yor toe on the support that holds the rear axle of your stationary trainer. Start with a few reps of 20 revolutions per leg. Yes, 20. Try to get the rpm up to 80 or until you start clunking around; back off- goal is smooth power. I can now do a few minutes on each leg, having worked at it since last Novemeber. I still have a long way to go.

If nothing else, it breaks up the monotony

'meat
 

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dogmeat said:
I strongly disagree for four major reasons-
1) Biking is an art form- I feel and appreciate the better form as I begin to attain it.
2) Good form puts more power to the pedals instead of fighting your body- your spedometer will appreciate it almost immediately
3) Riding with friends, smooth and predictable riding is what everyone wants.
4) Winter training is boring, boring, boring. One legged intervals break up the monotony. The longer you can train, the better you'll feel when you can hit the road.

I got rollers to break up my boring resistance trainer. It is a bit scary, you could crash if you don't respect the rollers. After a few weeks I got on the stationary trainer. It felt good. The one legged intervals-- WOW, wow! MUCH easier than I ever felt before. We had a patch of good weather, and when I hit the road, I could feel the difference, and it felt good.

My tip- rest the tip of yor toe on the support that holds the rear axle of your stationary trainer. Start with a few reps of 20 revolutions per leg. Yes, 20. Try to get the rpm up to 80 or until you start clunking around; back off- goal is smooth power. I can now do a few minutes on each leg, having worked at it since last Novemeber. I still have a long way to go.

If nothing else, it breaks up the monotony

'meat

I agree with dogmeat. I read about this drill in Bicycling Mag (I think), and gave it a try. Not only does it really isolate your "cycling" muscles, but smoothes out your stroke as well. The trick is to keep a constant pace, especially in the weak portion of the motion, and not to rely on the downstroke for momentum. I went out last weekend and felt much more smooth and consistant, especially on the hills.
 

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Spinerval...

...work outs have some one legged drills in them.He uses high resistance to develope leg strenghth and technique.I find they help but I wouldn't do them all the time.
 

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dogmeat said:
Start with a few reps of 20 revolutions per leg. Yes, 20. Try to get the rpm up to 80 or until you start clunking around; back off- goal is smooth power. I can now do a few minutes on each leg, having worked at it since last Novemeber. I still have a long way to go.

If nothing else, it breaks up the monotony

'meat
20 revolutions per leg sounds a way to low. I have started with 1 min per leg without a big problems (but, probably, I'm lucky - never had feel that I pedale in squares).

Normally I do one-leg drills on trainer 1.5 -2.0 minute per leg trying to keep with one leg the same wattage as was before it with 2 legs (shall to admit - not very successfully). Repeat them 4 times for each leg without pauses (i.e unclip one leg, do a drill, change leg, do a drill, change leg, ...). Works like magic.
 
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