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One more follow question for all of you that helpep and responded about my dog being attacked Friday. I already know how weird this question is going to sound...

I still have a bunch of weird feelings and wondering how the dog feels about me. I realize t hat t his might be entirely nuts, but I spend all day everyday with him and he really is my best friend. Since I was holding his leash when it happened, I hope that I am not blamed. But, the part I feel the worst about was after it happened, our vet couldn't see the dog for a couple hours. I knew it wasn't that serious, just a puncture, and had the bleeding stopped, so I choose to wait to go our trusted vet in lieu of someone we didn't know. I was scared to take the dog back to the office, for fear that he would lash out on someone there, so I left him at home and checked in on him a couple times to make sure all was well. Now I have some goofy feelings of guilt over abandoning him in his moment of pain and cannot stop feeling as though this has changed our relationship - I know just how nuts this must sound - what can I say.......

Just worrying/venting a bit,

Zach
 

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2 busy workin' 2 hang out
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Qstick333 said:
One more follow question for all of you that helpep and responded about my dog being attacked Friday. I already know how weird this question is going to sound...

I still have a bunch of weird feelings and wondering how the dog feels about me. I realize t hat t his might be entirely nuts, but I spend all day everyday with him and he really is my best friend. Since I was holding his leash when it happened, I hope that I am not blamed. But, the part I feel the worst about was after it happened, our vet couldn't see the dog for a couple hours. I knew it wasn't that serious, just a puncture, and had the bleeding stopped, so I choose to wait to go our trusted vet in lieu of someone we didn't know. I was scared to take the dog back to the office, for fear that he would lash out on someone there, so I left him at home and checked in on him a couple times to make sure all was well. Now I have some goofy feelings of guilt over abandoning him in his moment of pain and cannot stop feeling as though this has changed our relationship - I know just how nuts this must sound - what can I say.......

Just worrying/venting a bit,

Zach
It sounds like two things.

1) You're a good dog owner and love your dog very much.
2) You're overthinking it and it will be okay.
 

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i'd bet he/she gets a bit skiddish around the place of the attack but less so about other interactions.
 

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eminence grease
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Dogs don't think like that, they exist in the here and now. While their behavior can be modified by patterns of abuse or pain, a one time fight with one of their pals isn't going to change anything about them. Your relationship with your dog is about food and security and it sounds like you do those two things just fine. He doesn't understand the idea of you holding a the leash, they don't have the mental vocabulary for complex things like that.

You need an SO, those relationships are far more worthy of your thoughts.
 

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nahh

buy him a gun
he'll feel alot safer
 

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terry b said:
Dogs don't think like that, they exist in the here and now. While their behavior can be modified by patterns of abuse or pain, a one time fight with one of their pals isn't going to change anything about them. Your relationship with your dog is about food and security and it sounds like you do those two things just fine. He doesn't understand the idea of you holding a the leash, they don't have the mental vocabulary for complex things like that..

Thank you.


To the OP, I'll resound what Terry b has stated.

Like I said in my previous post, your dog is a reflection of you. If you feel tense, guilty, worried, obsessive, fearful, etc etc etc, you're not helping him. In fact, by hanging on to something he doesn't understand or process like a human does, you're doing the opposite, he'll actually pick up on your negative emotions and reflect that in negative behavior. Simple as that.

Why do you think unstable dogs come from unstable environments?

Want to help your dog? Then move on. That will be the best medicine you can give him. Take him to the office tomorrow like any other day, think positive thoughts, and do NOT dwell or worry about how he's feeling. If he tries to bite or nip, correct him in a calm and assertive manner. Don't baby him or try to sooth him. As Cesar says, if you try and sooth, pet, or reassure an unstable dog, you're only reinforcing the unwanted behavior.

I wish you the best.
 

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"Worrying is like a rocking chair. It gives you something to do but it doesn't get you anywhere."

Movie quote from: Van Wilder (2002) - Van Wilder (Ryan Reynolds)

This may be the surfacing of a general underlying issue for you. Worrying about the past will get you nowhere fast. (I love psychology.) We really gotta be more like dogs and live in the now. We can't control yesterday or tomorrow but we can do something now to help make things better. Basically that all starts with communication.

If I feel like I've dissed my big little "doo doo head" I simply talk to him and play with him until we reconnect. Don't dote on your dog or kiss his azz, just talk to him like you would your friends. Tell him how you feel about what happened to him and how it felt when he bit you. Tell him you understand his grief and that everything is cool with you two and you are there for him. The tone in your voice, the attention you give him will let him know your feelings...and you will feel better as well. These animals are not stupid. They read us better than we read them.
 

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It sounds really as if you're far more traumatized by the attack than your dog. This makes sense. Your companion was attacked, and you had a crazy, worrisome experience. But instead of projecting that onto the dog, deal with your feelings as your own. You're still freaked out. That's all good. But be freaked out for yourself, not for your dog, who as others have pointed out, doesn't think that way. As far as he's concerned, you did your part by rescuing him in the first place and feeding him afterward. Now go deal with your freakout.
 
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