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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been suffering from saddle sores but only on the right side, directly over the seat bone.

I've had a professional bike fitting so I'm happy with my position but cannot seem to overcome this soreness developing after 40 miles.

I ride an Aliante saddle (on all my bikes), use Assos cream every ride, decent shorts so I've covered the basics.

The only thing I wondered was if my right leg is slightly shorter and pulling me off centre.

Any experience and advice welcome

Thanks in advance.
 

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Cycling induced anoesis
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FWIW, you may be correct that something related to anatomy is pulling you off center. Many riders (me included) favor a side because of (as but one example) a previous injury.

If the saddle is otherwise comfortable, before giving up on it I'd try lowering it by about 2mm's (note your beginning height before adjusting). If the soreness develops after about 40 miles, it may not take much adjustment to relieve the pain. But IMO if slight adjustments to saddle height aren't successful, it may take a pro fit to determine the cause.
 

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It's Good to be The King
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On a side note, I have found that Clearasil applied 3X a day will clear up a saddle sore very quickly. As to the cause, mine have typically been associated with too little chamois cream on longish rides. Good luck finding a cure!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
f3rg said:
It seems that saddle just doesn't fit you properly. Try a different model.
The search for the 'elusive' perfect saddle has been a life long journey. I cycled for 15 years pain free, dropped my milage for a couple of years following the birth of my children and my ass hasn't been right ever since.

I chose the Aliante for road bike as I ride pain free on my 29er singlespeed with the same saddle but with lower saddle height so PJs suggestion may be worth a try; I'll feedback but keep the suggestions coming please.
 

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Having different leg lengths is quite common, I'm told, and I also have this issue. Here are some things suggested to me, but it all depends on how much the discrepancy is.

You can buy or make cleat shims. Solved my issue nicely. I used several layers of a plastic milk carton, cut to fit under the cleat. You can only fit so many layers, though, until the screws won't seat correctly.

You can try a thicker insert in that particular shoe, if you have room for it in your shoe.

You can also try moving the cleat on the shorter leg slightly forward, and the other one slightly backward.

You can lower your seat a bit, but this can cause issues with the longer leg (from my experience).

Just to add, sometimes this asymmetry can be due to other factors, that can be worked back to correct position though physical therapy, and other techniques. It's not necessarily a bone length issue.
 

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Interesting thing I found just recently, it might apply to you. I seem to always get rash/sores on my left side. I used to have overall discomfort (posted on another thread) that I solved by lowering my saddle (quite a bit!) Once I got comfortable I realized I was still experiencing discomfort on long rides from rash/sores. I started wondering why it was just on one side? I finally realized that I don't sit straight on my saddle, I noticed that I sit a bit angled to the right on my saddle (I noticed it in my feet, my left foot toes in, my right foot toes out) So on one ride I decided to angle my saddle a bit to the right to match how I was actually sitting, not much, just a bit off center. It seems to have helped no more rash/sores on long rides! Not sure if it will help you but I am sure it is something simple like that, just become aware of how you ride, look at your feet, see if you can feel a funny pedal stroke etc.
As others have said, I would definitely lower the saddle a bit, that made the biggest difference for me but also try other things, just be sure to measure of mark before you do so you can go back to a base setting after trying things.
Good luck!
Rusty
 

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Definitely check your fit again, and don't assume the professional bike fitting you had done got it right; they may have just gotten you close.

I had saddle sore issues for years until I set my saddle fore/aft using the knee over the spindle. I had to slide my saddle forward over 2cm. After that, my saddle sores never returned.

Don't lounge around in your shorts after a sweaty ride.

If your Aliante is comfortable to you, then it's likely not the cause.

A leg length discrepancy is a possibility, but that should have been covered with your pro fit.

High end shorts and creams are not necessary to ride saddle sore free.
 

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Same Issues here after adjusting my saddle and countless fittings I finally started using Bag Balm lubricant. Now I never ride without it. I put in 4 60's a week and never have had that problem again. I even carry some with me on hot days.

R
 
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