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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So after a "saddle search", I settled on a ASPide I borrowed from a friend. A bit hard, but felt good throughout long rides and short post-work 20 mile jobs.

So I return my friend's and go and buy my own and then things went bad.

I mounted my shiny new saddle and right off the bat, get this sensation that all my weight is on ONE sit bone, as if the saddle is crooked or something. Moving positions doesnt seem to help much. Examined the saddle and its straight and level on the bike and off. The longer I ride, the more the one (left) sit bone aches. Its as if there is no natural (or other) padding underneath it, but the other sit bone is padded and fine.

What gives? Bad saddle? Other issue? Anyone ever see this?
 

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I got an Aspide saddle last year, mid season...and it seemed ok (not great). But, I have had nothing but issues with it this year - can't get comfortable...and yes, and 'one sitbone' issue. I'm ready for a change...need to look around, though.
 

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Goodbye, Pork Pie Hat
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"ONE sit bone hurting?"

Have it removed. You can survive just fine with one.
 

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RoadBikeReview's Member
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YGB321 said:
So after a "saddle search", I settled on a ASPide I borrowed from a friend. A bit hard, but felt good throughout long rides and short post-work 20 mile jobs.

So I return my friend's and go and buy my own and then things went bad.

I mounted my shiny new saddle and right off the bat, get this sensation that all my weight is on ONE sit bone, as if the saddle is crooked or something. Moving positions doesnt seem to help much. Examined the saddle and its straight and level on the bike and off. The longer I ride, the more the one (left) sit bone aches. Its as if there is no natural (or other) padding underneath it, but the other sit bone is padded and fine.

What gives? Bad saddle? Other issue? Anyone ever see this?
What types of roads do you ride on? Do you favor one leg? How much is your saddle/handlebar drop? Where on the saddle do you sit, and do you move around? Do you get out of the saddle? How long are your rides? Does it hurt on and off the bike, or only on/only off? If only on, how long does it take you to get the sore feeling? How many miles are on your saddle?

These specifics can help answer your question. I had a similar issue with my saddle at one point, not an ASPide, made a couple changes, and I feel great for hours now, chamois or not.

-estone2
 

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Not straight?

For one reason or another, you might be sitting crooked on your bike. Have someone knowledgeable look at you as you pedal, especially when riding hard and fast, seated in the saddle. The most common problem is a tilted pelvis (one hip lower than the other), a dropped shoulder, and one shoulder closer to the bars than the other.

Also, check and see if your saddle is horizontal as you look at it from behind the bike. If one side is slightly down, there will be unequal pressure on the contact points.
 

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scruffy nerf herder
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Tons of reasons, especially if the saddle is too high or too low. There could be all kinds of factors... including discrepancies in leg length. I think almost all riders favor a leg, and think about your rides... when you coast, which leg is most often up or forward. When you stop at a stoplight and tilt the bike to stand, what leg do you start with, when you sprint, what is typically your lead leg...

I think one of the most likely culprits is saddle height, and Im going to venture to guess it may be low, only reason I say this is that too high would cause excessive bi-lateral pelvic tilt (to both sides). But this is only a guess.

If you do find your fit to be ok, then check with your doc on leg length. Its not uncommon at all to have differing leg lengths. In fact French champion Luc Leblanc had a childhood accident that I believe left one leg some 2.5 cm shorter than the other, and he still turned out to be a stud. So, keep us posted on what you try.

good luck
 

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RoadBikeReview's Member
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funknuggets said:
I think almost all riders favor a leg, and think about your rides... when you coast, which leg is most often up or forward. When you stop at a stoplight and tilt the bike to stand, what leg do you start with, when you sprint, what is typically your lead leg...
When I said do you favor one leg, it was with the knowledge that everyone does. However I was talking about more than one should - such as one leg being along for the ride and the other hammering, et cetera
-estone2
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Thanks everyone. Little follow up on this.

Took the MTB out on the road today, for the helluvit, and guess what? Same problem. Ive been off the roadie for almost a week, so "lingering" pain from the last road ride should not be an issue.

Nuggets...youre almost right on...my seat IS low....going higher bit-by-bit.

Anyways...with 3K on the clock its time for a professional fit, anyways. Lets see what the fitter has to say about this...plus other issues.
 
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