Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm planning to buy this spring and I'm curious about differences between Onix and Orca Framesets. I'm looking at approximately $800 difference between similarily equipped Onix vs Orca (Rolf apex wheels, FSA crank, etc)

Obviously Orca is lighter (and has a cooler name) but I'm wondering if there are other tradeoffs.
 

·
Maybe Next Year
Joined
·
121 Posts
The main reason it's lighter is that the Orca has the full carbon SL fork, while the Onix has the AC fork with an aluminum steerer. That probably accounts for much of the weight - but I'd be speculating how that translates as far as ride quality, as I've only ridden the Opal.

They both appear to be great machines - the Onix is a supurb value. With that $800, you could do just about anything to bring the weight down if that was your concern.
 

·
Defender of Freedom...
Joined
·
611 Posts
You can also spec...

WrigleyRoadie said:
The main reason it's lighter is that the Orca has the full carbon SL fork, while the Onix has the AC fork with an aluminum steerer. That probably accounts for much of the weight - but I'd be speculating how that translates as far as ride quality, as I've only ridden the Opal.

They both appear to be great machines - the Onix is a supurb value. With that $800, you could do just about anything to bring the weight down if that was your concern.
a SL fork with the frame vs. the AC fork (assuming your just ordering a frame) for a $100-150 upcharge.

JR
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
52 Posts
Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Ramjm_2000 said:
a SL fork with the frame vs. the AC fork (assuming your just ordering a frame) for a $100-150 upcharge.

JR
Actually, weight isn't my biggest concern at the moment. I want a bike I can be very happy with and not outgrow in the next 5 years. I have been primarily a mtn bike rider for years after road racing in my youth. Not racing at the moment but doing 20-25mph rides with a plan at mostly 40 - 60 mile rides and the occasional century. I live in a very hilly area and love to climb. Right now I need to lose 15 lbs on me to really get where I want to be.

I'm also somewhat frustrated with my LBS who are acting more like used car salemen than the typical very cool and helpful bike store owners I'm used to working with. They are heavily pushing the Orca but I dont' hear anything in the guys argument that makes me feel like he's credible. He's the only Orbea dealer in the area and I like to buy from a local store. The mechanics at the store are great so I'm good on that front.

I've ridden both and the Orca is a slightly nicer ride (but this might also be the sticker influencing my opinions.)

At lease my other top contender the 'Dale six13 team is an easier decision - one is DA and one is Ultegra and there are different wheelsets on an identical frame.

Bottom line - I have a fixed amount to spend and the dealer isn't going to sweet talk me into dropping more $$ just as a play to my pride and ego. One of the things I'm considering is investing in more gear with the $800 I'd save by going with an Onix. He'd get the $$$ either way.
 

·
Roadie...I think...
Joined
·
37 Posts
From what I heard from a salesperson the other day the Onix has some fiberglass in the frame, approx. 30% of the total where the Orca is 100% CF.
I have been looking at them also and the price difference is a large one...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
pspande said:
Actually, weight isn't my biggest concern at the moment. I want a bike I can be very happy with and not outgrow in the next 5 years. I have been primarily a mtn bike rider for years after road racing in my youth. Not racing at the moment but doing 20-25mph rides with a plan at mostly 40 - 60 mile rides and the occasional century. I live in a very hilly area and love to climb. Right now I need to lose 15 lbs on me to really get where I want to be.

I'm also somewhat frustrated with my LBS who are acting more like used car salemen than the typical very cool and helpful bike store owners I'm used to working with. They are heavily pushing the Orca but I dont' hear anything in the guys argument that makes me feel like he's credible. He's the only Orbea dealer in the area and I like to buy from a local store. The mechanics at the store are great so I'm good on that front.

I've ridden both and the Orca is a slightly nicer ride (but this might also be the sticker influencing my opinions.)

At lease my other top contender the 'Dale six13 team is an easier decision - one is DA and one is Ultegra and there are different wheelsets on an identical frame.

Bottom line - I have a fixed amount to spend and the dealer isn't going to sweet talk me into dropping more $$ just as a play to my pride and ego. One of the things I'm considering is investing in more gear with the $800 I'd save by going with an Onix. He'd get the $$$ either way.
I'm making the same decision right now. Call Orbea-USA, they've been pretty helpful and will answer any questions you might have.
 

·
tofurkey hunting
Joined
·
4,733 Posts
i just ordered an onix last friday. i rode both bikes briefly. for me, the value of the onix sealed it. it's a very smooth ride (i might even say a bit smoother than the orca). i rode each down brick roads, so...and like you said, the price difference will let you buy a lot more goodies.

you said you didn't care about weight, but the onix is only 200 g or so heavier. no real biggie in the scheme of things. also, have your lbs check orbea's inventory. mine ordered me a 2005 onix with the lighter fork for a great price. i think they were out of 57s. mines a 54. the value outweighed the worse paint job (IMO). i was able to do a complete custom build and still come in waaay under the starting point for an orca. if you go with the onix, you will not be disappointed.

only my $.02
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Orca/Onix differences

The frames are different in a number of ways - both are composed of a combination of formula 1 and aerospace grade M30S high-modulus and T700S medium-modulus carbon fibers. T700S makes the frame very durable and M30S fibers allow Orbea to make a bike that is very light and stiff.

The Orca has replaceable dropouts and a 50/50 blend of M30S and T700S fibers. The tubes are also shaped differently and have a different carbon weave giving the frame different riding characteristics. The Orca is slightly stiffer than the Onix and also has the SL fork and cooler paint.

The Onix does not have replaceable dropouts. I think the frame is 80% T700S fibers and 20% M30S fibers. The Onix has more rounded tubes and a different carbon weave than the Orca. The Onix comes with the AC fork.

I was having a tough time deciding as well but ultimately went with the Orca.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3 Posts
fdoneit said:
The frames are different in a number of ways - both are composed of a combination of formula 1 and aerospace grade M30S high-modulus and T700S medium-modulus carbon fibers. T700S makes the frame very durable and M30S fibers allow Orbea to make a bike that is very light and stiff.

The Orca has replaceable dropouts and a 50/50 blend of M30S and T700S fibers. The tubes are also shaped differently and have a different carbon weave giving the frame different riding characteristics. The Orca is slightly stiffer than the Onix and also has the SL fork and cooler paint.

The Onix does not have replaceable dropouts. I think the frame is 80% T700S fibers and 20% M30S fibers. The Onix has more rounded tubes and a different carbon weave than the Orca. The Onix comes with the AC fork.

I was having a tough time deciding as well but ultimately went with the Orca.
I've heard pretty much the same thing as you, except that the guys at Orbea-USA told me the Onix is a bit stiffer than the Orca.

For what it's worth, I went with the Orca as well. Hopefully it will be in in about 2 weeks.
 

·
Self admitted user
Joined
·
143 Posts
Onix features

I am looking right now at my wifes 05 Onix and it certainly does have a replaceable drop out ( which reminds me to pick up the one I ordered to have in the tool box just in case).

From my good friend at Cyclecambridge.com who has owned an Orca and Onix and is an Orbea dealer, he has differentiated the frame selection by the criteria ... all day comfort or race day efficiency. The orca's noticeably stiffer as could be associated with a set of Mavic Kysirums vs a more compliant ride of the Onix which could be compared to a carbon spoked wheelset like the Topolino's.

My wife went with the Onix/Topolino's as she'd rather ride 3 days straight than 3 hrs at full tilt and needing the next day off.

In going with the Orca ... you just may end up opting for a more compliant saddle, tires and grip tape to accomplish a level of comfort that matches the performance.

Apparently the new Opal is much like the Scott CR series... brutally stiff and efficient.

Not my cup of tea certainly.



fdoneit said:
The Onix does not have replaceable dropouts. I think the frame is 80% T700S fibers and 20% M30S fibers. The Onix has more rounded tubes and a different carbon weave than the Orca. The Onix comes with the AC fork.

I was having a tough time deciding as well but ultimately went with the Orca.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
460 Posts
My 2c worth , I rode both today in 57cm, my impression and I have tried almost everything,
The Onix was a comfortable good handling bike, light but may have suffered from really heavy wheels, the Orca while a little lighter and responsive, was not worth the money. I know that there is no fiberglass in the onix it is just a different mix of the carbon types. The Opal is very stiff race bike, not for many folks. I think the Onix if it was to have the dura ace group instead of the 105 and light wheels would be just as good a bike. I feel it was 5% difference at most to me. And the money is not a issue as I am looking at Colnago. Best I have ridden so far was a Trek Madone 5.9SL But they will not swap parts to my liking. Lots of nice bikes out there.
Best rides so far,
Trek Madone, Time VRS Orbea Onix Serrota Mevici($$$$)
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top