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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Where would you guys suggest I buy my first bike, Online, or one of the shops we have in town here? :)
 

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Scary Teddy Bear
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First Bike?

Sonz70 said:
Where would you guys suggest I buy my first bike, Online, or one of the shops we have in town here? :)

Shop in town, you need to get fitted correctly, and also if their needs to be any adjustments made or repairs, until you are pretty handy and experienced with working on your own bikes, you should stay away from the internet bikes.
 

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I highly agree with physasst, unless you really know about road bikes. I bought my first road bike online. I got it delivered on Friday and just got it built up yesterday by a local bike shop. And I have run into few issues:
1. My bike was originally built up with stem lowered (racey). When I put the stem turned over, we noticed that the cable housing and cable was too short. This will cost me some extra $ to make sure that correct length is on the bike (need to rewrap the tape).
2. For some reason, even though all the drivetrain components were Ultegra 10, it shipped with Ultegra 9 rear cassette. In order to complete the build, I had to buy a new Ultegra 10 rear cassette. This will be dealt with my online shop, but it's a hassle that can be avoided.
3. Fiting can not be performed online. Typically bike shop will charge extra $ to get the fitting that you need.
4. My local LBS did not have the bike in the size that I wanted, so I was not able to test ride it before buying online. After having the bike delivered and built up, I noticed that the bike might have too short of Front Center length. (Coming from mtn biking world, I never had to worry about this :( ) I basically have toe overlap. The front of my shoe bangs against my front wheel if I try to do a sharp turn of the handlebars.
5. My LBS was willing to swap out the drivetrain to triple from double for very minimal cost, but now it involves quite huge investment in my part, if I want to switch over to triple.

On the positive side, I got a great deal on my bike. But after all the cost, getting it built, paying for new rear cassette, changing the cables and housing, bike might not be the right fit for me due to toe overlap, it ends up being only slightly good deal.
 

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Scary Teddy Bear
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Yep

sungchang said:
I highly agree with physasst, unless you really know about road bikes. I bought my first road bike online. I got it delivered on Friday and just got it built up yesterday by a local bike shop. And I have run into few issues:
1. My bike was originally built up with stem lowered (racey). When I put the stem turned over, we noticed that the cable housing and cable was too short. This will cost me some extra $ to make sure that correct length is on the bike (need to rewrap the tape).
2. For some reason, even though all the drivetrain components were Ultegra 10, it shipped with Ultegra 9 rear cassette. In order to complete the build, I had to buy a new Ultegra 10 rear cassette. This will be dealt with my online shop, but it's a hassle that can be avoided.
3. Fiting can not be performed online. Typically bike shop will charge extra $ to get the fitting that you need.
4. My local LBS did not have the bike in the size that I wanted, so I was not able to test ride it before buying online. After having the bike delivered and built up, I noticed that the bike might have too short of Front Center length. (Coming from mtn biking world, I never had to worry about this :( ) I basically have toe overlap. The front of my shoe bangs against my front wheel if I try to do a sharp turn of the handlebars.
5. My LBS was willing to swap out the drivetrain to triple from double for very minimal cost, but now it involves quite huge investment in my part, if I want to switch over to triple.

On the positive side, I got a great deal on my bike. But after all the cost, getting it built, paying for new rear cassette, changing the cables and housing, bike might not be the right fit for me due to toe overlap, it ends up being only slightly good deal.
Plus, you won't really know what you want or need, at the LBS you will be able to test ride a lot of different models and speak to someone knowledgeable about bikes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I should also mention, Im getting into cycling really for 2 reasons, the first to lose weight, I weighed 220 pounds 3 years ago, and now top out at 375.. the second is to get is because I loved cycling years ago, and would not mind getting back into athletics again.
 

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physasst said:
Plus, you won't really know what you want or need, at the LBS you will be able to test ride a lot of different models and speak to someone knowledgeable about bikes.
With my small inseam, I knew I wanted a compact geometry and wanted either steel or titanium. I did test ride a few and narrowed down to what I wanted. Unfortunately, they did not have the size or were able to get more of the 05s, so I ended up going online. On a hindsight, I should have really found one and test rode it - the toe overlap issue is a concern for me :(
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
The one shop I went to hear in London didn't offer test rides, I wasn't aware I could have any. As well the only models they really showed were James models (which ran 600-1200), More or less why I started looking online and came across here. Any suggestion on questions I should ask when I go in again? Thanks for the help so far guys.
 

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btw, i know this is sacrilige on a roadie site, but have you considered going for MTB converted to road use? eg: 1.25" slicks.

A decent MTB would be cheaper than an "average" road bike and probably stand up better. I think at those weights, most of the advantages of a road bike are lost anyway. Not being mean or anything, i'm self conscious and heavy for a roadie myself, but at that weight could you ride 23mm roadie tires on anything other than a perfect road? can you get into the drops comfortably and pedal? If the answer is no, a MTB with slicks would probably work better and be more comfortable and cheaper.
 

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Sonz70 said:
I should also mention, Im getting into cycling really for 2 reasons, the first to lose weight, I weighed 220 pounds 3 years ago, and now top out at 375.. the second is to get is because I loved cycling years ago, and would not mind getting back into athletics again.

if those figures are right, i would highly recommend forgettign anything lightweight. Ti is NOT a wonder material, it's not as strong as steel. So i would recommend going that way.

If you mean jamis, then i think that bike shop is alright. They use reynolds 631 steel, and if its the quest model which is an all steel main triangle, you're probably onto a winner IMHO. I wouldn't mind one of those myself. IF you end up having problems with the wheels, you'll need to run custom 36 spokes in the rear probably. But that would be a nice bike that should last you a long time, and still be suitable for serious road work.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
wankski said:
btw, i know this is sacrilige on a roadie site, but have you considered going for MTB converted to road use? eg: 1.25" slicks.

A decent MTB would be cheaper than an "average" road bike and probably stand up better. I think at those weights, most of the advantages of a road bike are lost anyway. Not being mean or anything, i'm self conscious and heavy for a roadie myself, but at that weight could you ride 23mm roadie tires on anything other than a perfect road? can you get into the drops comfortably and pedal? If the answer is no, a MTB with slicks would probably work better and be more comfortable and cheaper.
Hmm..all my research has been on road bikes, what would I look for in a MTB bike? The guy at the shop mentioned someone else who I think converted a MTB and a road bike? Im clueless on this stuff really.
 

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Sonz70 said:
The one shop I went to hear in London didn't offer test rides, I wasn't aware I could have any. As well the only models they really showed were James models (which ran 600-1200), More or less why I started looking online and came across here. Any suggestion on questions I should ask when I go in again? Thanks for the help so far guys.
How much is your budget?

Where in London have you been? There are several good shops that could help you out.

PM me if you want me to call you to discuss further as I'm in London.

Sean
 

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Sonz70 said:
Hmm..all my research has been on road bikes, what would I look for in a MTB bike? The guy at the shop mentioned someone else who I think converted a MTB and a road bike? Im clueless on this stuff really.

hrmm, a good mountain bike for road use would have big alloy tubes, the biggest you can find.. the groupset doesn't matter so much, but deore on up is great. As for wheels, you'll likely find them mostly 32 spokes laced up to double wall rims, this is all good news for you. The problem with most off the shelf roadies is that they use thin alu tubes and wheels with few spokes. As few as 20 or so.. It looks good, but a heavy guy would have a torrid time on this type of bike. Things *will* break - and they're expensive.

Some manufacturers like jamis will make steel frames, but they are harder to find, generally more expensive, and still come with low spoke count wheels which will give you trouble. The only other route is to go custom. Old school renoylds tubing+ handbuilt 36 spoke wheels would be bombproof, but then you're talking money!! (or of course you can swap out the wheels on a steel off-the-shelf roadie when and if they fail you)

As for the conversion of a MTB to road duty, simply swap out the tubes and tyres for 1.25" or 1.5" slick types, your LBS can hook u up. You'ld also probably want clipless pedals, but thats optional and a matter of preference...

basically, i would spend about 600-800AUD for a decent MTB bike like that + pedals and decent tyres and tubes... (about 550-750 CAD) You'ld never get a decent road bike for that.. no way.
 

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Toe Tapping

sungchang said:
...the toe overlap issue is a concern for me :(
Do not let the toe overlap issue concern you. It is common in small road bikes and the changes in geometry to eliminate the toe overlap can screw up other parts of the ride and fit. The only time you will ever notice the toe overlap is in a parking lot test ride. When on the road you will never turn your bars enough to experience toe overlap.
 
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