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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello all. I am looking to get a road bike possibly next spring. I have a favorite brand which is Diamondback and I'm looking at the Century 2. The only thing is there is not a Diamondback dealer near me so I would have to order it online. There is a Giant dealer close to me, I have a Giant mountain bike, and I have also been looking at the Contend SL Disc. My question is should I go with my favorite and order the Diamondback, or should I go to a LBS and get the Giant? If I get the Giant I'd have the luxury of having the LBS to help me with any issues or work to be done. Thanks for any info.
 

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Hello all. I am looking to get a road bike possibly next spring. I have a favorite brand which is Diamondback and I'm looking at the Century 2. The only thing is there is not a Diamondback dealer near me so I would have to order it online. There is a Giant dealer close to me, I have a Giant mountain bike, and I have also been looking at the Contend SL Disc. My question is should I go with my favorite and order the Diamondback, or should I go to a LBS and get the Giant? If I get the Giant I'd have the luxury of having the LBS to help me with any issues or work to be done. Thanks for any info.
Big question with lots of aspects. Are you sure of the fit? Can you fully check out and assemble a mail order bike? Are you comfortable with resolving any issues that crop up via mail order?

As an example, my daughter and her husband bought bikes from Bikes Direct with my guidance. When the bikes arrived I checked them out, tuned them up, and adjusted the fit. After about 3 weeks the back wheel on his bike went wobbly because it had been built with insufficient tension. I re-tensioned the wheel and it has been fine ever since. So this was the way to go for them. Without me in the picture what would they have done?
 

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Are you sure of the fit?

This is the biggest question. It is most important that you get sized and fitted correctly. You can't get a fit online.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Thanks everyone. The sizing is no problem I already know what I need there it's just the thing that if something needs adjustment I'd be lost.
 

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Thanks everyone. The sizing is no problem I already know what I need there it's just the thing that if something needs adjustment I'd be lost.
There's your answer
 

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Thanks everyone. The sizing is no problem I already know what I need there it's just the thing that if something needs adjustment I'd be lost.
This is not a lost cause. Other people have learned to maintain their own bikes. There is no reason you can't do the same.

With the proper tools (modern bikes require very few), you can learn to do basic stuff like adjust the gears, clean the drivetrain, adjust the brakes, etc... From there you can tackle the harder stuff, like replacing cables, chains, brake pads, etc... Most of this basic maintenance stuff is not that diffucult on modern bikes.

That said, there are many other reasons to buy a bike from your local shop. I generally maintain all of my own bikes, but I still make as many purchases as I can (including all of my bikes) from my shop.
 

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Thanks everyone. The sizing is no problem I already know what I need there it's just the thing that if something needs adjustment I'd be lost.

What BikerJulio said.

Yes, learning bike maintenance and repair is a valuable thing. But this requires time, tools and a general mechanical inclination. Some people have it, some don't.

Regardless, you can't fit yourself. Just because you have the correct size frame doesn't mean everything is adjusted to fit you correctly. The frame size is just a starting point. There are many other items to adjust in order to dial your fit correctly. A good bike shop will put you and your bike on a trainer, watch you pedal and make these adjustments to dial in your fit. This is not something you can do on your own.
 

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Cycling induced anoesis
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The sizing is no problem I already know what I need there...
I'd advise caution on this. There are no industry standards, so manufacturers methods of measuring for frame size vary - and can change with year/ model.

Then there's fit. And as Lombard posted, a series of adjustments/ tweaks must be made to dial it in - some being counter intuitive.

My advice is to visit as many shops as you can, test riding bikes that fit your intended uses/ budget. Assess shops along with bikes, because they'll be a valuable asset post purchase.
 

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Shuffleman
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There are positives and negatives to both scenarios. Giant and Diamondback both make good bikes. The LBS will service either bike. To me it is really a matter of price at this point. If you want the Diamondback then you just have to accept that if there is a savings you may give back that savings when you pay for a basic fit and if it needs any maintenance up front. If you do not mind paying for those than go for the DB.
If you buy the Giant, than the bike should include a fit and making sure that it is maintenance free. Some shops extend that maintenance but you should assume that after the first year, you will be paying to have either bike serviced.
I will say that I understand your loyalty to the brand. I road only mtb in the 1990's. I owned Trek and Specialized mtbs but in 1992 got rid of them and bought a GT Karakoram. I loved that bike. When I started riding again about 5-6 years ago, I looked to my old brand, GT. I quickly realized that they were not the same company that they were when it was owned by Gary Turner. I think that DB has gone the same route.They are still good bikes but not what they once were. Too bad. Anyway, I digress. Sorry. Long story short, I would not be afraid to buy On-Line, IF, you know your size. With that being said, I would buy the Giant.
 
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