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I am planning to go and race in Colorado Springs in April. I live at sea level and and heard different people telling me that to go and race in altitude I am better off arriving only 24 hours of the race. The race is actually Saturday and Sunday. I can get there even 3 days in advance but now with people sugestions I am thinking it twice. Any advice about when to get there since I will not be able to get there more than 5 days in advance.
 

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Impulse Athletic Coaching
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You will most likely compete at your worst between 24-48 hours after arriving at altitude. Your body typically adapts most starting at 12hrs. I would recommended one of two things:

1. Sleep at sea level and drive to the race each day (like 2hrs before the start) and then leave ASAP. Or,
2. Arrive as early before as possible...like, 4-5 days.
 

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iliveonnitro said:
You will most likely compete at your worst between 24-48 hours after arriving at altitude. Your body typically adapts most starting at 12hrs. I would recommended one of two things:

1. Sleep at sea level and drive to the race each day (like 2hrs before the start) and then leave ASAP. Or,
2. Arrive as early before as possible...like, 4-5 days.
ok where is the closest sea level from colorado springs?
 

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Been on both "sides" of that ...

I used to live at 6500' and race. Had a real advantage.

Now I am at sea level and have faced the problem you are asking about. There really isn't any good way to manage that...especially with your time-frame.

It's said you need a few weeks at altitude to really adapt. It's said you lose performance after about half a day at altitude. So I've tried to get there from a lower altitude the morning of a race. That works, but you're tired from driving or flying. I've done stage races where I finish the race then go to the lowest practical nearby town for the night between stages. I think it's around 5000' where you are supposed to really get hammered by less O2 in the atmosphere...

Mainly I just suffer and suck wind..

Don Hanson
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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iliveonnitro said:
You will most likely compete at your worst between 24-48 hours after arriving at altitude. Your body typically adapts most starting at 12hrs. I would recommended one of two things:

1. Sleep at sea level and drive to the race each day (like 2hrs before the start) and then leave ASAP. Or,
2. Arrive as early before as possible...like, 4-5 days.
4-5 days will get you nowhere. most people need 2-3 wks at the very minimum to acclimate to that kind of altitude. your best bet is to get there as close to possible before the start. first day might not be bad at all, the second and third could be much worse. you'll dry out and as your body figures out there is less oxygen, you'll get out of breath quicker.
 

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Not to hijack the thread but what about the reverse situation. I live at 6300' asl and most of my riding is done at that level and higher. I am considering the Tour de Tucson later this year, it is around 2000' asl there, would I have to acclimate to that level?
 

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2wd said:
Not to hijack the thread but what about the reverse situation. I live at 6300' asl and most of my riding is done at that level and higher. I am considering the Tour de Tucson later this year, it is around 2000' asl there, would I have to acclimate to that level?
Uhhhh....no. Just enjoy the ride and new-found legs.

When I go to lower elevations, my limiting factor is my legs. Cardio fitness is not a problem. I did a ride in San Diego in October and I felt like Superman.
 

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2wd said:
Not to hijack the thread but what about the reverse situation. I live at 6300' asl and most of my riding is done at that level and higher. I am considering the Tour de Tucson later this year, it is around 2000' asl there, would I have to acclimate to that level?
no but you probably have to acclimate to sh!t roads and an extremely sketchy pack.
 

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I moved to Colorado from Wisconsin two years ago, and it took me a few months to fully adapt to the altitude. Because of your time constraints, I can't offer any more advice than to arrive as early as possible and drink, drink, drink. You'll be amazed at how quickly you'll become dehydrated.
 

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I'm assuming you're doing USAFA? If you haven't done this race, it's a fantastic course. Maybe go spend a couple of days in the mountains and get ready for that little hill
 

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the best possible situation is to live high and train low.

being that you are living low, try to spend as much time as high up as possible. go into the mountains or higher elevation. even if you are only getting used to 2000-3000 feet it will be easier on your body when the real change happens during the race.

water is a big factor as well. lots of it way before and after, but pay attention not to over hydrate.

get an alltitude tent. it will only help your racing in the long run as well.
 
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