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I am looking to purchase an Orbea Opal and was wondering for those who have owned and ridden this bike how is the feel?

I have heard it is a very stiff bike which helps when you really need to hammer it but, how is it on a long ride.

Compare to a Trek 5900 or Madone 5.9

Appreciate all inputs

Thanks,

Biker45
 

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Something else to consider

This is not directly related to your question, but it is something else to think about. Here is a link to a recent thread on Orbea's service after-the-sale / warrantee. This certainly would make me think twice about purchasing that brand regardless of ride characteristics...
http://forums.roadbikereview.com/showthread.php?t=57486&highlight=Orbea
 

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I have recently built up an Opal w/DA10 as a race bike. I expected this to be a little too stiff for general riding, but I have found this to be smoother than my Trek 5500 and my custom Ti compact. Great frame, puts power directly to pedals and has very quick but stable steering. Built up to about 15.5 lbs(in 60 cm size) with Easton carbon bar and lightweight seatpost, seat and a 1500 gm set of wheels. Would highly recommend....
 

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limit screwed
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And this is another thread from the Orbea forum about positive interactions with the company and it's crash-replacement policy: http://forums.roadbikereview.com/showthread.php?t=46801

I think the OP in the Onix thread's story about the bike breaking sounds a little fishy, and the company may have been reluctant to give a crash replacement deal. Then again, it may have been the LBS' he dealt with.
 

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Ride quality is primarily determined by rider position, wheelbase, and fork. Since the fork is cantileved off of the frame, it can deflect to absorb some road shock. A longer wheelbase provides a smoother ride, all else equal. All frames are inherently stiff vertically. Any vertical deflection will be too small to be noticeable and will be masked by the much larger deflection of the tires, seatpost, fork, stem, handlebars, and saddle. Frames may vary in torsional stiffness, and this might be noticeable to the rider but would not generally be characterized as a component of "ride quality."

Since Orbea does not provide a spec for wheelbase, it will be difficult to compare with other bikes. However, given the relatively short chainstays, you can probably assume a bit harsher ride.
 

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Orbea does provide wheelbase measurements

Orbea does provide wheelbase measurements, you just have to look a bit harder for them. :D



HeronTodd said:
Ride quality is primarily determined by rider position, wheelbase, and fork. Since the fork is cantileved off of the frame, it can deflect to absorb some road shock. A longer wheelbase provides a smoother ride, all else equal. All frames are inherently stiff vertically. Any vertical deflection will be too small to be noticeable and will be masked by the much larger deflection of the tires, seatpost, fork, stem, handlebars, and saddle. Frames may vary in torsional stiffness, and this might be noticeable to the rider but would not generally be characterized as a component of "ride quality."

Since Orbea does not provide a spec for wheelbase, it will be difficult to compare with other bikes. However, given the relatively short chainstays, you can probably assume a bit harsher ride.
 

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Orbea does provide wheelbase measurements

Orbea does provide wheelbase measurements, you just have to look a bit harder for them. :D

http://www.orbea.com/caste/cuadros.php?tipo=1&familia=1&cuadro=3




HeronTodd said:
Ride quality is primarily determined by rider position, wheelbase, and fork. Since the fork is cantileved off of the frame, it can deflect to absorb some road shock. A longer wheelbase provides a smoother ride, all else equal. All frames are inherently stiff vertically. Any vertical deflection will be too small to be noticeable and will be masked by the much larger deflection of the tires, seatpost, fork, stem, handlebars, and saddle. Frames may vary in torsional stiffness, and this might be noticeable to the rider but would not generally be characterized as a component of "ride quality."

Since Orbea does not provide a spec for wheelbase, it will be difficult to compare with other bikes. However, given the relatively short chainstays, you can probably assume a bit harsher ride.
 

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I picked up my Opal (size 51) yesterday, can't say much yet since I only rode it for 15' on the hilly streets behind the LBS. On those 15' the bike felt fast, agile going up the hills and most of all: smooth. The steering was quick and responsive. I've ridden my friend's Orca briefly also, and all I can say the Opal felt a bit stiffer but not enough to call it harsh. The road feedback is excellent and "muffled". Keep in mind also my previous ride was Reynolds steel.
I'll report later when I take it on its maiden voyage, on a rather long ride this weekend.
My current Opal set up is: Ksyrium SL 3s, carbon handle bar, and Vittoria Diamante Pros tires. Al seat post
FYI: the geometry of the Opal is the same as the Orca's.
I'm 5'8, 30inch inseam, rather short torso and arms. 157 lbs.
Looks wise: what a piece of art ! I need a drool bib to not stain it.
Corsaire :)
 

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I just so happened to test ride an Orbea Opal with Ksryium SL's. Immediately after that, I test rode a Trek 5.9 SL Madone.

I really liked the Opal a lot. It is drop dead gorgeous, and rides great. The ride was compliant, stiff and responsive but without being what I would call harsh in any way. The Orbea is a very sweet bike.

Then, I got on the Trek 5.9SL and while I truly wanted to love the Opal more, the Trek just felt lighter and more responsive. Equally smooth if not smoother than the Orbea. That could have everything to do with the way the bike fit me too. The Trek was exactly my size. I think the Orbea that was in stock was one size off from what I would choose.

I don't think you can go wrong in terms of comfort and performance with either bike, but the Orbea wins the "cool factor!" That is one Sexy bike! I rode the the same color Opal as in this thread. Carbon/Blue. Sweet!
 

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My personal experience with a carbon Trek Madone, was of a "wooden" feel on the road, I personally didn't like it at all. It's a good bike I'm sure, race proven by no other tha the master: Lance.
It really comes down to what fits you best, personal perception and the kind of ride a bike frame gives you : if you like it, then it's the bike for you.

Corsaire
 

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Rides great, climbs great, looks sexy. A little over 500 miles on mine so far and I'm crazy about it. I'll report back after another 500 or so if this threat is still going strong.
 

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At last, today Sunday I could take my new Orbea Opal on its maiden voyage after a rainy Friday and Saturday.
I did 75 miles, moderatelly hilly. Of which 50 was with a group.
For better reference I must say all I rode before was steel (Bianchi Vigorelli '03, Reynolds 631). This is my first carbon road bike ever.
Performance:
This bike is fast, accelerates at the touch of the pedal so to speak, agile going uphill, I even chased uphill for 1/2 a mile (6%) a guy who blew passed me and the bike just went to his wheel the moment I stood up on it. Down hill is a rocket, it just wants to go faster, had to put the brakes though 'cause I got a bit scared not really sure what really was further down the hill. Better safe tha sorry. On a pace line, flat road, once the bike gains momemtum, the bike just keeps on going, we hammered for few miles at 25-28mph, felt even quick & responsive to bridge any little gaps every once in a while. Steering is scalpel
sharp, where you aim it goes.
Comfort: I don't have any other real experience with carbon to compare, but I have ridden very briefly on a pkg. lot a friend's Orca. The Orca felt very forgiving and plush on that brief ride, in circles, inside that pkg. lot.
The Opal is stiff as a board, some here said it before, and it's accurate, that I think, explains the efficiency and performance of the Opal. Road feedback is very good. Smooth roads are just that, silky smooth; rough roads and potholes get somewhat muffled by the carbon frame, stiff w/o being harsh. I finished today's ride w/o feeling tired or beat up, per se.
Conclusion: the Orbea Opal is more about performance than just pure comfort but w/o being harsh. I don't see any problem using this bike for long rides, which for me are 100 plus rides. I'm quite impressed with this bike, and it's a head turner.

Corsaire :)





Corsaire said:
I picked up my Opal (size 51) yesterday, can't say much yet since I only rode it for 15' on the hilly streets behind the LBS. On those 15' the bike felt fast, agile going up the hills and most of all: smooth. The steering was quick and responsive. I've ridden my friend's Orca briefly also, and all I can say the Opal felt a bit stiffer but not enough to call it harsh. The road feedback is excellent and "muffled". Keep in mind also my previous ride was Reynolds steel.
I'll report later when I take it on its maiden voyage, on a rather long ride this weekend.
My current Opal set up is: Ksyrium SL 3s, carbon handle bar, and Vittoria Diamante Pros tires. Al seat post
FYI: the geometry of the Opal is the same as the Orca's.
I'm 5'8, 30inch inseam, rather short torso and arms. 157 lbs.
Looks wise: what a piece of art ! I need a drool bib to not stain it.
Corsaire :)
 

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Glad you enjoyed...

your first long ride. I must say I feel the same after going from and aluminum Merckx to the Opal. I did 65 today and other than normal fatigue, didn't feel the beat up body wise I used to on the aluminum.

Post a pic of your set up. We gotta see it!!
 

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Opal pics:

I'm not cutting the steering tube yet until I'm comfortable with my set up. Just switched to
a 110 mm stem, feels better.
FSA Compact crank, DuraAce pedals, Easton Carbon handlebar , Ksyrium SL3s and
Diamante Pros.

Corsaire :thumbsup:
 

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Mosovich said:
I love mine. I weigh about 195 and it's a dream. Stiff, light and comfortable. Did 80 miles today, road like a dream!
That's odd, considering the Dream is made with highly manipulated aluminum tubes and a different geometry. I would think the two would have different ride characteristics.

Just kidding, great looking bike.
 

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First impressions of the Opal

I also just finished building my new Opal; Saturday I did 65 miles on my Record equipped C-50, sunday I did 55 on my Record/Chorus/Centaur Opal. Both are equipped with Ksyrium SL wheels and Keo pedals, and Flite saddles; the only significant difference in setup is that I'm running Record alloy cranks/BB on the C-50, and Truvativ Roleur Carbon inegrated crank/BB on the Opal. This increases Q-factor on the Opal by about 5mm.

Overall bike weight is nearly identical, as the Opal frame is a bit lighter, and there is some weight savings with the Truvativ cranks to offset the heavier group components on the Opal. I spent a fair amount of time making sure that the Opal is set up identically to my C-50 as far as saddle setback, saddle-bar distance and drop and so on, so the main difference is in the frames.

First impression of the Opal was that it is stiff as a board under power (I'm 6'2" 185 lbs), possibly a tad stiffer than the C-50, though the fact that I'm running outboard-bearing cranks on the Opal could make for a stiffer ride. The Opal was slightly less plush than the C-50, though by no means harsh. The C-50 has a reputation as one of the plushest frames going, and can feel smooth to the point of "deadness", that is it's so plush/smooth I used to regularly check that my tires were fully inflated. This is great on very long rides, but the Opal definately felt a bit "snappier" or "crisper", if you know what I mean. I still didn't feel beat up by the Opal, but I think I'd choose the C-50 for a century or longer ride. Out of the saddle, the Opal was as stiff as anything I've ridden; the tall headtube means very few spacers were needed to get my bars where I want them, so the front end was rock solid in both sprinting/climbing and braking/descending situations. All in all, having ridden my C-50 exclusively for the last 5,000 or so miles, I was able to forget I had a different bike under me for goodly stretches of time; given the quality of the C-50, and how happy I am with it in general, that's a big compliment for the Opal!

Pics to follow...
 
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