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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
after hitting a few good size potholes in the road on my ol' steel bike, i realized just how cushy steel is. which is, not cushy at all. so, after nearly ruining my wrists, i'm wondering if there's any sort of good way to prevent damage like this...is there any sort of dampener that goes into the head tube? or, something with the handlebars; would it be worth finding a set for $20 and putting it on a 30 year old bike? or, should i just buckle down and get some really squishy bar grip?
 

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Try going around them next time.

If you want a really cushy ride, get a bike that has clearance for 37mm tires and run them at 50psi.
 

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old_fuji said:
after hitting a few good size potholes in the road on my ol' steel bike, i realized just how cushy steel is. which is, not cushy at all. so, after nearly ruining my wrists, i'm wondering if there's any sort of good way to prevent damage like this...is there any sort of dampener that goes into the head tube? or, something with the handlebars; would it be worth finding a set for $20 and putting it on a 30 year old bike? or, should i just buckle down and get some really squishy bar grip?
What have you been riding that's more resilient than steel? I've never tried CF or Ti, but my steel Rambouillet is much cushier than my old Cannondale.
Missing the potholes is a good idea for a number of reasons. Larger tires are good. I haven't bought anything smaller than 32 in years, and I do most of my riding now on 35s or 37s at 75 psi. It doesn't slow me down much (I was plenty slow to begin with), and it's much more pleasant.
Is your position OK? If you're putting too much weight on your arms, that can worsen wrist problems. Raising the bars might help.
look at the angle of the bars and the location of the levers on them. Rotating the bars up to create an almost-flat area behind the levers might help. You can do that and maybe slide the levers up a bit, And check your grip--are you death-gripping the bars or levers, or just letting your hands rest comfortably on them? Fairly small adjustments in the stuff I've mentioned can make a big difference.
 

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Cory said:
And check your grip--are you death-gripping the bars or levers, or just letting your hands rest comfortably on them? Fairly small adjustments in the stuff I've mentioned can make a big difference.
Having too tight of a grip is an easy habit to slip into.

It took several spinning classes of the instructor reminding me of form to fix this bad habit. Basically, you don't want to put weight down on the handlebars. You want your arms and wrists mostly relaxed. This requires that your core is tight so that you can support your weight with your lower body.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
my wrists have gotten a lot better since i simply put new griptape on (instead of that old perforated electric tape that came on the bike)

but, i am taking a lot more of the body positioning tips into consideration...the only big thing now is my fingers kinda hurt after i ride the brake hoods for a long time
 

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Miiles said:
Is your seat level? Seriously.

If its leaning forward you could be putting pressure onto your hands that you don't want.
Definitely check that and also fore/aft position in the saddle also.
 
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