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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi,

I was setting up my new Ritchey WCS carbon seat post today and was in a rush to start my ride. Unfortunately I appear to have over tightened it as the carbon has been pressed a little into the gap at the top of the frame (by only about .5mm). :mad2: I only saw this when I raised the seat by 5mm.

I realize I have over tightened it but I would be grateful if someone who understands stress on carbon could comment on how much I have compromised the strength? It still seems perfectly fine but I read somewhere that if carbon does break it doesn’t not give as much warning as steel.

Also - what torque should I be using on a carbon seat post?

Cheers
 

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Fat Guy in a Little Coat
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dazman said:
Hi,

I was setting up my new Ritchey WCS carbon seat post today and was in a rush to start my ride. Unfortunately I appear to have over tightened it as the carbon has been pressed a little into the gap at the top of the frame (by only about .5mm). :mad2: I only saw this when I raised the seat by 5mm.

I realize I have over tightened it but I would be grateful if someone who understands stress on carbon could comment on how much I have compromised the strength? It still seems perfectly fine but I read somewhere that if carbon does break it doesn’t not give as much warning as steel.

Also - what torque should I be using on a carbon seat post?

Cheers
As you have two conflicting views on the viability of the seat post already, and the picture is somewhat blurry, I'd take it in to the local LBS for their opinion. Any material can fail if compromised through being over tightened. Best to have it looked at by someone familiar with the material.

With respect to what torque is appropriate, there are several books (and I'm sure web sites) that can give you an acceptible range; www.sheldonbrown.com should have this info. Unless you are properly using a properly calibrated torque wrench, even this might not help. The rule of thumb I've always used is enough torque to keep the post in position, and no more. Again, your LBS will probably have no problem helping you with this, and will probably even show you on your bike.
 

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crimped seat post

If there is any doubt it should be replaced. Like any part that has a great deal of stress it is under, it is better that it be "servicable". Chalk this one up to experience, get a new one and enjoy your ride.
 
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