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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Ummmk, Im around 275lbs at 6'4" and at the end of last summer I started looking into cycling because I wanted to loose some weight. I went out and bought a Trek 1.2, wanted something along the lines of a 2.3 but for some reason all the bikes my LBS carry are 1.2's and the Madone 4 series. I diddnt have the need or money for that matter for a madone. The reason that I put up a thread was because I HAVE to get a new wheelset. Now back in the summer I am tired of having to take a special trip to town to get my wheels trued every week :mad2: . I have looked into Velocity's Deep V wheels and Im pretty certain thats the way I want to go. I have made some small mods to my bike like getting clipless pedals, a new saddle, and some aero bars but I regret not getting a better wheelset first. I just wanted to know whats the least amount of spokes I need to get? After that question is settled I want to know where im going to get them, My LBS has never even heard of velocity, I suppose if it doesnt have to do with the big names they have no clue about it. I want a wheel that I wont have to get trued. The tires on the current alex 32 spoke rims are fine, but im just tired of them getting out of true all the time. Sorry for the wall of text :D , just trying to explain the need of the new wheels. Thanks.
 

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baker921 said:
Try Mavic CXP33's and 36 spokes. Mine are built on Ultegra hubs with Sapim race spokes.
Just what I would suggest - DT Comp spokes will do just as good of a job. Original Poster - please stay away from the new fashion low spoke count wheels. They were intended for 135lb sponsored pro racers but fashion and great marketing made heavy people think that they had to have them too.

Road Bike Review partner store Bicycle Wheel Warehouse builds the 32h versions and maybe owner Chris will tell you if they will be enough wheel for you if you speak to him. He's the one who has to warranty them. His prices are very tough to beat.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Yea I know that whole deal about the low spoke rims now, I wasnt expecting there to be a super strength 18 spoke wheel that I could ride on or something like that. I was in the market for a 32-42 spoke wheel. I suppose that the bicycle companies dont think that fatter people want to change their lifestyle or something. Im looking into the CXP33's right now.
 

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First of all, I am amazed when I hear that LBS have never heard major brands. Knowledge and training for employment at some bike shops is about on par with your average Best Buy store. Sad.

Choose a rim that is aero in shape, not for aero factor, but because it makes a stronger rim than a box type. Mavic CXP33, Velocity DeepV, or even Velocity Aerohead OCs are good quality rims to start with.

If you are going custom builds, which I think you should, I'd suggest 36h hubs in back, 32h in front. The rear is where the bulk of abuse will take place. 14/15 spokes should work fine. You can do 14g on the drive-side rear, and 14/15 everywhere else if you like. Be sure to use brass nips and not the alloy. You will eventually destroy those. Make sure also you are using steel skewers and not lightweight aluminum ones. The forces on the rear wheel can cause the wheel to move in the dropouts with whippy skewers.

There's no substitute for more spokes when strength is your goal. Be picky about who you have build the wheels. Wheelbuilding is an art and just because your LBS says they can build a wheel, doesn't mean they can build a wheel that will be done right and be trouble free. If it were me, I'd spec out the exact wheelset I wanted at Colorado Cyclist or Excel Sports and have them do it. They have an extremely long track record of building wheels and certified wheelbuilders who will do it right the first time. It takes about a week. I had a smaller outfit called Spin Lite Cycles build a set because they carry Velocity rims and they did a great job that has held up beautifully.

brewster
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Im not trusting my LBS to build a wheel, at all. ever. It is sad that my LBS doesnt really even know what their doing /cry. Dont get me wrong I like going up there and talking to the owner but their lack of knowledge is disturbing. Im using the front skewer that came with my bike and im using the rear skewer that came with my trainer. I checked out spinlite and all I seen up on the site was a 32hole rear and a 28 hole front. How much money do you think I would have to drop to say for them to build a wheel like your talking about you think?
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
If I could get a good deal on a set of 32h velocity deep v's should I go for it?

EDIT: Stock from velocity btw.
 

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wow, a shop has never heard of velocity? good bye to that shop; maybe they're never heard of campy, either. i'm specing a build @ bicycle wheel warehouse. i sent an email with a question, and in less than 15 minutes Chris answered it with a clear answer plus another recomendation. they're going to get my business. i remember i had a big guy (300+) friend who broke his madone after 3 rides (cracked near the bb), and he was looking for wheels. recomendation was mavic cxp33 on ultegra hubs, straight gauge spokes, brass nipples. you can pick those up @ bww for less than $250.

Sell your current bontrager wheels on craigslist for say, $60, and you'll be good to go brother. Quite a quality upgrade for $200, for sure.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
stumpy_steve said:
wow, a shop has never heard of velocity? good bye to that shop; maybe they're never heard of campy, either. i'm specing a build @ bicycle wheel warehouse. i sent an email with a question, and in less than 15 minutes Chris answered it with a clear answer plus another recomendation. they're going to get my business. i remember i had a big guy (300+) friend who broke his madone after 3 rides (cracked near the bb), and he was looking for wheels. recomendation was mavic cxp33 on ultegra hubs, straight gauge spokes, brass nipples. you can pick those up @ bww for less than $250.
Exactly thats what im talking about, the entire reason I wanted a 2.3, you get a pretty sweet groupset without the full carbon bike. Ive read countless times about carbon fiber doesnt really give you any clues for when its going to break unless you see minor cracks or something. I hope to upgrade my groupset pretty soon maybe to full ultegra. Im amazed at all the ultegra pieces going for steals on egay. I seem to becoming quite fond of the place.

Lol on the Campangolo joke... Sorry for the noob question, but when you mean straight gauge spokes what exactly are you talking about??
 

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Kicksome123 said:
Exactly thats what im talking about, the entire reason I wanted a 2.3, you get a pretty sweet groupset without the full carbon bike. Ive read countless times about carbon fiber doesnt really give you any clues for when its going to break unless you see minor cracks or something. I hope to upgrade my groupset pretty soon maybe to full ultegra. Im amazed at all the ultegra pieces going for steals on egay. I seem to becoming quite fond of the place.

Lol on the Campangolo joke... Sorry for the noob joke, but when you mean straight gauge spokes what exactly are you talking about??
I really liked the 2.3 (used to work @ a Trek dealer), and felt unless you were going to a 5.1 or better, stick with the 2.3. Full 105/Ultegra 10sp for I think $1,600 is not bad. Since you're a big guy, I really recommend you riding a carbon frame. The stiffness will blow you away, no joke. I'd probably not go the route of upgrading your 1.2 frame, and instead sell it and buy something used on craigslist. So many deals going on out there; it's ridiculous. Hell, even ebay. Only issue is 61s aren't very common to find used, but you should be able to find something. Example in bay area:

http://sfbay.craigslist.org/search/bik?query=60&minAsk=1000&maxAsk=max

Straight gauge spokes are spokes with no butting; they're the same width from top to bottom. Some spokes are butted, which basically means fatter on the ends, skinny in the middle for weight. You want straight.
 

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I've never used his service, but Peter White is reputedly a good custom wheel builder in the NE.

His rant is worth reading too, although he is a little curt regarding riding weight and durability:
Peter white Cycles/Wheels I'm a geeze, so his comments about 36 spoke rears seem right to me.

Sheldon Brown used to complain that most stock wheel sets had the same spoke count for fr and rear, when you need the strength on the rear.

I just had a couple of traditional campy sets spoked up with 32 fr/36 rear using Ambrosio Excellence rims-decent quality and good price--done at a shop here in NYC.

(I'm still under 200--although a long way from the svelte guy I was as seen in my avatar...)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Yea I see what your getting at one the used bike deal. Im really digging that specialized. I dont get why your recommending me a carbon bike though since your friend broke his bottom bracket. Was he too heavy and im not or what?
 

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Kicksome123 said:
Yea I see what your getting at one the used bike deal. Im really digging that specialized. I dont get why your recommending me a carbon bike though since your friend broke his bottom bracket. Was he too heavy and im not or what?
I think (possibly might get flamed for this by ti/steel riders) that carbon is the best material for road. Naturally dampens, can be made to be extremely stiff and customizable, ect... He broke it after 3 short rides. After getting a new frame, I haven't heard of anything since. It's been 1+ years. Just go into your LBS anyway and ride a carbon frame, just to try it. It's worth a shot.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
stumpy_steve said:
I think (possibly might get flamed for this by ti/steel riders) that carbon is the best material for road. Naturally dampens, can be made to be extremely stiff and customizable, ect... He broke it after 3 short rides. After getting a new frame, I haven't heard of anything since. It's been 1+ years. Just go into your LBS anyway and ride a carbon frame, just to try it. It's worth a shot.
I wish it was that easy, you see the LBS is quite small. Well thats being nice, its small as crap. He most likely wont have any carbon bikes in my size as there are about at most 10 road bikes when I walk in. 9 of them are 1.2's and there will be one 54cm madone maybe. Cycling isnt a big sport AT ALL here in Dothan, AL. There are 2 in the town, theres the one I go to and then there is the other thats a steel framed building which looks like was bought off one of them commercials with no air conditioning and this guy doesnt carry road bikes at all. Although hes the nicer of the two bike shop owners and he also has a heck of a collection oh vintage schwinns. Even if he had the madones or any carbon bike for that matter in stock I'd feel weird going in there asking him if I could ride the bike with no real intention of buying it. Its just something with me riding a bicycle that has a retail of 2k+. Before looking into cycling I had no idea an entry level road bike could even cost as much as they do. I certainly would like to take a carbon bike for a ride though, Im going down to panama city beach here pretty soon and im definitely checking out that bike shop. I hope they have some good stuffs!
 

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Kicksome123 said:
Yea I see what your getting at one the used bike deal. Im really digging that specialized. I dont get why your recommending me a carbon bike though since your friend broke his bottom bracket. Was he too heavy and im not or what?
Imo I wouldn't get a carbon bike if I were your weight, I'd get something more solid (just my opinion).
 

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Imo I wouldn't get a carbon bike if I were your weight, I'd get something more solid (just my opinion).
Yeah your right, carbon isn't a very solid material at all. They don't use it in fighter jet construction or anything really demanding. :rolleyes:

Carbon is just like any other material including titanium, steel etc. The strength of the frame will be determined by the thickness of the tubes, bonding techniques etc. Many companies sacrifice frame strength for lightweight. This happens with the other materials as well, not just carbon. There are plenty of carbon frames out there that will take the OPs weight for many many thousands of miles and offer lifetime warranties.
 

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Kicksome123 said:
I wish it was that easy, you see the LBS is quite small. Well thats being nice, its small as crap. He most likely wont have any carbon bikes in my size as there are about at most 10 road bikes when I walk in. 9 of them are 1.2's and there will be one 54cm madone maybe. Cycling isnt a big sport AT ALL here in Dothan, AL. There are 2 in the town, theres the one I go to and then there is the other thats a steel framed building which looks like was bought off one of them commercials with no air conditioning and this guy doesnt carry road bikes at all. Although hes the nicer of the two bike shop owners and he also has a heck of a collection oh vintage schwinns. Even if he had the madones or any carbon bike for that matter in stock I'd feel weird going in there asking him if I could ride the bike with no real intention of buying it. Its just something with me riding a bicycle that has a retail of 2k+. Before looking into cycling I had no idea an entry level road bike could even cost as much as they do. I certainly would like to take a carbon bike for a ride though, Im going down to panama city beach here pretty soon and im definitely checking out that bike shop. I hope they have some good stuffs!
Dude, check out Competitive Cyclists demo program. Granted, it's not cheap by any means ($300), but you can demo a kick ass carbon bike by BMC, Cervelo, Pinnarello, or Ridley for 2 weeks. Plus, if you end up buying a bike from them, they credit it to your account (that is, within 2 weeks, which I find a bit fast). They've got 61s in both the Cervelos & BMCs & a 59.5 in the Pinarello.

You might hold off until you're ready to drop cash on a new bike, but I'd ride one before upgrading any more parts on your current Trek. Other than the wheels, of course. You'll be keeping those for awhile.
 

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I am 6'2" and weigh 265 lbs. - My wheels Velocity Aerohead front and Fusion rear both laced to Dura-Ace hubs with 32 14/15 spokes. I has some issues with an Areohead OC rim on the rear but these seem to be cleared up with the Fusion rim.

As others have stated go with either Mavic CXP 33's of Velocity Fusions or Deep V's. 32 spokes should suffice, but 36 on rear wouldn't hurt, laced to an Ultegra hub. Velocity makes there own hub, I don't know anything about it but expect it is decent, someone else her can probably provide a review.
 

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And many larger riders swear by Mavic Open Pro wheels with Shimano Ultegra hubs. Colorado Cyclist sells these handmade and all the reviews I've read say they are out & out excellent. And under $300 for the set.

Trek, and just about all the big manufacturers of bikes, have been cutting corners with the wheels these days. It's a bad state of affairs (and the economy) when the bike you want is great in all the ways you like - but the wheels bite.

Are you listening, TREK?!

Good Luck!
 
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