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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I like to spend a couple of days per week really pushing myself hard while on the trainer. I feel like I can simulate crit racing pretty accurately by "feel" and a rudimentary measurment of my HR while wearing a monitor. This is the training method I have used for several years now, as I only do about 3-4 races per year. Cat 4-ever...30 yo, male, 6', 200lb.

I have no medical history or knee problems, but when I am really turning the cranks, I feel a weakness in the back of my right knee. It can be painful enough to force me off of the pace. We are talking about cadence in the 120+rpm area. No pain or discomfort lower than that. No such pain the left knee. This pain is not new, but it is only observed when pushing those cranks at that very high cadence. At this pace, using the resistance settings on my trainer and 52-19 rings, I observe my peak HR at about 170bpm after 2 minutes.

Any suggestions on what's going on? Anyone else ever deal with this type of issue?
 

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General rule

As a general rule, pain behind the knee suggests the saddle is too high. Try lowering your saddle just a few mm and see if that helps. Also, one of the problems with trainers is that the dead spot is emphasized if there is no flywheel. If you don't get this problem on the road, then maybe it is intrinsic to your trainer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks for the reply. I have observed the problem out on the road as well. I do not feel like it's related to the trainer. However, the possibility of seat being a tad high is probably very true. I have recently experimented with stem height, but I don't believe that has anything to do with it.
 

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A lower stem or longer stem can also stretch the back out. Back connected to hips, connected to hamstrings, connected to knee.

In addition to checking saddle height, stretch hamstrings, hips, lower back. Try doing isolated hamstring stretches followed by some pike stretches (sit down on floor, legs straight out front, and touch your forehead to your kneecaps a few times ;-)
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
yeah, stretching is something that I usually totally neglect. I try to do some things in the saddle to stretch out. But it usually goes ignored. Thanks again for the tips. May have to think about that new positioning I am experimenting with.
 

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I'll second the suggestion of lowering your saddle just a tad. I did it yesterday over lunch after the same symptoms (pain behind my knee, uncomfortable seat after a few miles, etc). Commuted back home and rode in again today and it's been absolutely trouble-free.
 
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