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All or Nothing Baby!!!
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I have an enclosed trailer with a wood bottom that I use to transport my little hobby race car around a few times a year, and I also stay in the trailer on the weekends that I am at the track. Right now it just has a bare wood floor, which is okay, but I want to make it a little easier to clean the floor and feel a little cleaner.
I know there are a million ways to cover the floor with plastic plates, etc., but I just want to paint it with a finish that will protect it from fluid leaks and make it easy to wipe up and clean. It seems like most of the products out there are for garage floors or they are stains for decks. What I am looking for is something more like paint/sealer combination.
Does anyone know where to start?


Thanks!!
 

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epoxy
 

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I would go with a garage floor product. I know it's made for cement but I think it will work just as well on your wood trailer floor.

I just bought a trailer but didn't get around to painting the floor yet.
 

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What about spray-able pick up truck bed liner?

Not meaning to hijack the thread, but I'm having a garage built and would like to paint the floor -- anyone recommend a product?
 

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Low rep power
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Whatever you guys decide to use for your respective projects, ***read the safety data sheet first** before starting work!!!

Epoxies are allergic sensitizers (both dermal and respiratory), as are the isocyanate compounds in bedliner products. Think LOTS of ventilation if you're in a relatively confined space like a trailer, along with skin and respiratory protection.
 

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Boobies!
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Standard product used to be Porch and Floor Enamel--dried down hard and didn't tend to crack or peel.

When we did porches, we would mix in particles to give a little bit of a non-skid finish--Home Despot offers this:
BEHR Premium Non-Skid Floor Finish Additive-97024 - The Home Depot

I'm sure you could use an epoxy as Andy suggests--but I would set up a fan -- hang it off the top of the trailer door maybe?--if you are using epoxy--don't want you keeling over from fumes.

Not sure about those home garage kits--but read the directions (or call the mfr) to see if they approve it over wood, because that is essentially an epoxy.

For an new garage?--there was a recent thread over on Paceline--more than a couple of folks said that they would pay to have the floor finished rather than DIY, because the DIY did not last very well...
 

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half-fast
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Painting concrete is a problem. It is always a problem. I have had a couple of horrible experiences. We go through great gobs of planning, cleaning, testing, and monitoring of temperature and humidity before we coat concrete floors.

Even so, I have seen failure between layers, failure to adhere, and one floor that blushed in multiple locations several days after application.

First, read what Saf-T says and take it to heart. This stuff will kill you, and hurt the whole time you are dying.

Second, prep, prep, prep.

Some of the prep can kill you as well. Some of it will just maim ya.

There are a few commercial grade products that are precatalyzed. Sherwin Williams makes them.

There are other commercial products that require specialized training and methods.

Also SW.

Anyhow, there are a couple real problems with painting a surface for cars. Tires get pretty warm. This coupled with turning motion of wheels tends to cause the coating to fail.

The next major problem is the varying fluids that leak out of a car, which are also hostile to coatings.
 

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Forever a Student
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Clean by sanding, not by pressure washing. Pressure washing just forces contaminates deep into the wood to resurface later to ruin adhesion. So sand the crap out of it before applying anything.
 

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Somehow I got derailed and didn't finish answering.

Wood is a special problem because of the expansion and contraction. Most concrete finishes aren't going to be suitable for wood.

I think you are going to be disappointed with how this works out. But I'm a glass half empty guy with paint on floors.

If you choose to pursue this, start with a call to a professional coating manufacturer's technical support line.
 

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We used to use a Marine LP urethane topcoat over a marine primer for wood boats on the race trailer floors. I think it was Awlgrip brand. It drys super smooth so you need to use some anti-skid in the paint. Use some hardener in it and it becomes very oil resistant.
 

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All or Nothing Baby!!!
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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
It sounds like it may be easier to use a regular gloss finish paint for the floor.
Luckily with my setup I have 2 2x10's that the car drives up on (too low to open the door over the inner-fender otherwise), so the wheel/tire turning issue won't be a problem with the floor. It's really just to make the trailer cleaner and easier to clean.

I've seen enough of the spray-in bed liners to know that I don't want that. Most are very rough, some are even rough enough you wouldn't want to walk on them barefooted, so I'll pass on those.
 

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I've used this stuff -- latex floor enamel -- for a wooden front porch floor that gets rain and snow blown in, sand tracked in, snow shoveled off, all kinds of abuse. I don't drive cars on it, but on the whole I don't think your use would be tougher.
https://www.benjaminmoore.com/en-us/interior-exterior-paints-stains/product-catalog/bmfs/floor-patio-latex-enamels
It has held up well for several years, and the only prep I did was scraping loose paint.

It's extremely easy to put on, and dries fast enough to allow two coats in a day. Almost no odor. I think they make a glossier version, too.
 

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Whatever you guys decide to use for your respective projects, ***read the safety data sheet first** before starting work!!!

Epoxies are allergic sensitizers (both dermal and respiratory), as are the isocyanate compounds in bedliner products. Think LOTS of ventilation if you're in a relatively confined space like a trailer, along with skin and respiratory protection.
This.

For spraying isocyanates, I would not use anything less than a positive pressure supplied air respirator (think SCBA). Probably not practical for the weekend guy unless you already have it.

If painting them with a brush or roller, eye protection and a filtered respirator with organic vapor cartridges should be sufficient.

In both cases, full body coverage is essential. No exposed skin.

For moisture cured urethanes (POR-15 or single pack brush on bed liners), xylol is the solvent you need for reduction and cleaning. I usually use foam brushes and just toss them.
 

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If the car is rolling on 2x10s, and you just want an easy a clean surface to spruce it up for when you're sleeping in there, why not go to a home improvement store and get a box or two of laminate floor tiles, Marmoleum, etc.?
 

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Costco sells rubberized garage floor sheeting in a 10' x 20' roll for $250.00 or so (bought mine couple years back). It comes in different colours and has same pattern as diamond plate on it. Cut it to fit and Glue down the piece on ramp. Inside piece I did not glue down and can pull it out and scrub it anytime. Way nicer to work with, looks great and holds up very well.
 
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