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I have been using an Arkel Bug pannier on the left side of the bike for over a year. Once I am rolling I don't notice the Bug at all. I am communting on paved bike lanes or paths the entire 40 mile RT commute.

I have a sneaking suspicion, however, that having the Bug on the left side (filled to about 25 pounds) is causing my rear wheel to need truing more often than if I had the load split into two panniers (left and right side of rear wheel). Have folks experienced this phenomenon when using 1 pannier on 1 side of the bike for an extended time?

I'm considering looking into a large saddlebag attached to the seat which would also even the load across the back. Not sure if this would be preferable to the Bug, left and right panniers or whether having that much weight that high up would be clummsy.

Any input would be appreciated.
 

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NeoRetroGrouch
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OrlandoV said:
I have been using an Arkel Bug pannier on the left side of the bike for over a year. Once I am rolling I don't notice the Bug at all. I am communting on paved bike lanes or paths the entire 40 mile RT commute.

I have a sneaking suspicion, however, that having the Bug on the left side (filled to about 25 pounds) is causing my rear wheel to need truing more often than if I had the load split into two panniers (left and right side of rear wheel). Have folks experienced this phenomenon when using 1 pannier on 1 side of the bike for an extended time?

I'm considering looking into a large saddlebag attached to the seat which would also even the load across the back. Not sure if this would be preferable to the Bug, left and right panniers or whether having that much weight that high up would be clummsy.

Any input would be appreciated.
I don't see it having any affect on how true the wheel is. However, it may be better to have it on the right side. This way the bike would be leaning to the right and (I think) pulling on the non-drive (left) side spokes which have less tension. - TF
 

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huh?

TurboTurtle said:
I don't see it having any affect on how true the wheel is. However, it may be better to have it on the right side. This way the bike would be leaning to the right and (I think) pulling on the non-drive (left) side spokes which have less tension. - TF
If you have excess weight on the right, I think you have to lean the bike to the left to go straight and not fall over.

Anyway, balanced is better for bike handling.
 
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