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N. Hollywood, CA
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754 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
One nice thing about waiting a year for a frame is that you have time to save up for nice parts. And plenty of time to wait around for the next great part to show up on the market.

Even Picasa couldn't balance the colors given the mixed lighting - fluorescent, halogen and LED. So I converted to B&W...
 

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N. Hollywood, CA
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754 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
choices

MB1 said:
4 Chainrings?!? A tandem?
It's just a road/rando frame, gonna be a double crank. I can't decide between 48/34 and 12-27 (what I'm used to), or 46/32 and 14-25. The latter choice spins out around 30mph but has a really nice spread of gears in the range I use most of the time. It's gonna be a 9-speed cassette since I'm recycling most of the drivetrain.

For those considering 10-speed, I noticed that Shimano now has 15-25 and 16-27 cassettes. Again the theme is giving up high gears that are rarely used and getting more where you need it most. Pretty cool to have so many options on the market. Perhaps versatility really is making a comeback...
 

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N. Hollywood, CA
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754 Posts
Discussion Starter · #6 ·
it's the SON 20R

JP said:
What is the deal with that hub? It doesn't look like all the SONs I see. Is that the one for smaller wheels?
It's the new SON 20R. Officially for 16-20" wheels if you follow German law stating that the dynamo must output at least 2.70W (full power) at 15 kph (9.4 mph). But on a 700c wheel it might not reach full power until 20 kph (12.4 mph). The testing was documented in Bicycle Quarterly Vol. 3 No. 4. Most 'sporting' cyclists ride faster than 12 mph, so brightness isn't an issue with the smaller hub. And there's less pedaling resistance than the SON 28.

And if you use an LED headlight built for a dynamo, then you'll get a brighter light at a lower speed than halogen. In other words, a step change in the efficiency (and lower pedaling effort) of dynamo light systems. Schmidt appears to be claiming nearly a factor of 10 improvement in brightness with LED:

http://www.nabendynamo.de/produkte/Edelux.html

Picked up the built wheel tonight and I gotta say it's VERY much lighter than the old SON. In my mind this hub eliminates weight weenie concerns and I hope that it approaches effortless pedaling during the day when the lights are off...
 

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N. Hollywood, CA
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754 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
minstrie said:
I'm in line for a custom rando frame coming in about 15mo., looking at the build. Like your gearing thoughts. Mind if I ask where you get your TA stuff? And plans on shifters? I'm thinking downtube for durability. Thanks.
Minstrie.
I got a number of things, including the TA cranks and the roller cable hangers, at Velo Orange.

After seeing some photos of how clean and simple the down tube shifter is, and thinking about eliminating the loops from barcons, and going to try the down tube. I'm recycling 9-speed Ultegra parts.

In the latest Bicycle Quarterly, Jan states that the first time he's ever used the largest gear on any test bike is on the 46-28 combo on the Coho randonneur. That says something coming from a PBP veteran. For us downhill coasters there's a lot more to gearing than the max. PM me if you want to discuss. I've had my head buried deep in Sheldon's gear calculator for months and I'm so dizzy that I can no longer decide!

I noticed a peculiar bit of misinformation concerning rando frames. The french word for bicycle, "velo", is masculine. Thus the bike should be called a "randonneur". But a number of frame builders are now using the feminine form (which should only be applied to a female rider, I presume, but not her bike)...
 
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