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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Question on whether or not the type of patches that require an adhesive are the way to go, or if the glueless type work as well.

thanks
 

· Big is relative
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rugger said:
Question on whether or not the type of patches that require an adhesive are the way to go, or if the glueless type work as well.

thanks
I have used the park stick-on patches on my commuter with some success, but I only run 90-100# in those tires. I haven't had much success with them on regular road tires at 125# or higher. I use traditional patches with the vulcanizing stuff on my road bike tubes. I have one wheel with three patches.
 

· confirmed masher
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i have a question, when patching a tube, why do you have to wait til the glue has dried before putting on the patch? and how does the patch stick to the tube? i also heard about using pieces of old tube as patches, is the patching process the same?
 

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Glueless are lame with regular road tires (above 100lb pressure). Too much pressure and not enough adhesion. Stick with glue.
 

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It depends on the situation. The Park glueless patches have worked every time I have needed to patch a tube while out on the road. I have even used them to 'boot' a cut tire. They stick well enough that they are difficult to remove. But when I'm patching tubes at home, I'll use regular glue and patches, and wait till the glue has dried. I usually save up my flatted tubes and do a bunch at once.
 

· Adorable Furry Hombre
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bigbill said:
I have used the park stick-on patches on my commuter with some success, but I only run 90-100# in those tires. I haven't had much success with them on regular road tires at 125# or higher. I use traditional patches with the vulcanizing stuff on my road bike tubes. I have one wheel with three patches.
Ditto bill.
 

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OneGear said:
i have a question, when patching a tube, why do you have to wait til the glue has dried before putting on the patch? and how does the patch stick to the tube? i also heard about using pieces of old tube as patches, is the patching process the same?
If you don't wait 'til the glue dries, the patch won't stick. Some chemical vulcanizing process goes on once dry that doesn't happen when they're wet. A buddy used to waste tons of patches, 'cuz he wouldn't let them dry. He was somewhat red faced when I mentioned his problem, and hasn't had an issue since.

Doubt old pieces of tube would work, as they don't have the softer rubber stuff that seals the hole. It may work, but really doubt the rubber of the patch would conform well enough to hold at over 100# of pressure.

Mark
 

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I put on a glueless patch last week. When it got hot the patch failed and leaked around a mold ridge. I had to peel off the original patch and try to get another one to stick. It lasted one mile, then I threw away the remaining patches and walked home.

These were the crappy ones from a Performance toolkit (partly my fault for forgetting my regular patch kit), but some things are worth noting: For every minute that I would have spent waiting for the cement to dry, I spent five minutes sanding down the ridges to try to get the glueless patch to stick. With cement at least you can fill in the gaps and get a sealed joint, especially if the first bond didn't take, but there's no second chance with the glueless ones.

IIRC the cement in patch kits is contact cement, similar to that found in any hardware store. The solvent has to evaporate before the bond is made -- otherwise it will continue to dissolve the adhesive.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks for all the input gentlemen, very helpful. Looks like I will go for the glue type. It's becoming a drag to keep buying tubes, have had 2 flats already this year, one was from a nail, but the other was from a defect, it started a slow leak after I pumped up. I will also order some Michelin tubes on line, unless someone has a better recommendation. I assume ultra lights are weaker too, I bet it doesn't really save much weight.
 

· Chili hed & old bike fixr
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rugger said:
Thanks for all the input gentlemen, very helpful. Looks like I will go for the glue type. It's becoming a drag to keep buying tubes, have had 2 flats already this year, one was from a nail, but the other was from a defect, it started a slow leak after I pumped up. I will also order some Michelin tubes on line, unless someone has a better recommendation. I assume ultra lights are weaker too, I bet it doesn't really save much weight.
For best results on patching a tube, use sandpaper or get some from the plumbing section at the hardware store. Do not use the roughing tool that looks like a cheese grater as it will weaken the tube. Those will work on old really thick low pressure tubes. You can use sections of an old tire as boots to keep in your seat bag. Make sure that you feather the edges of the boots or they will cause leaks later as the edge cuts into the tube.
 
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