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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
anyone every make a not so brilliant, high speed turn that resulted in the inside turning pedal making contact with the ground? I did such a think just yesterday. A few square inches of skin lost may seem like a steep price to pay (I've never crashed a road bike) for such a mistake, but really made me think about consistent pedaling.

I'm new to the fixed gear and am really stoked on it. this was a hard lesson to learn, but made me immediately respect the fixed gear (and see why the velodrome has banked turns).

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I have been riding ss more - riding to work - and the problem disappears. One thing about riding fixed that I like is that you have to be real alert.
 

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I learned that lesson the hard way on a mountain bike before I ever rode a fixie. Mashing hard into a sharp turn with bad timing and over the handlebars I went. On top of that the crash somehow popped my tire off the rim just a little bit so it was still holding the tube, which I didn't notice inspecting the bike afterwards. Get back on and start pedaling and not 100 ft later, pop, and over the handlebars I go again. That was a bad day.

Of course my worst crash, which will never be forgotten, was me riding with baggy pants that got stuck in the crank of my fixie. Please, for me, never, ever, let that happen to you. I still think about it constantly when I ride. Bike did a nose dive that brought me down with it. Bent my bullhorns straight down. Honestly I don't know how I didn't break my hand somehow but a few square inches of skin? Yes, on my hands. Very very ouch. Then, bleeding everywhere, I had to right my handlebars, compose myself, and ride shaking another 3 miles home.
 

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roadfix said:
I've pedal struck on free wheeling bikes before but never on a fixed gear.
^^^ now you have a real problem on your hands. Really should be the other way around for most.
 

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CleavesF said:
Really should be the other way around for most.
True, but having shorter cranks and a high bb really make pedal striking a rare occurrence on the FG unless you're really careless.
 

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I scrape my Times quite frequently on my regular bike (the 10 speed) but the way they are shaped it's not usually a problem, just keep riding. Kind of like curb feelers for how far you can pedal thru a corner.

On the track, however, I don't mess around. Pedal strike + steep banking = bad rash. Learned that lesson earlier this spring.

.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Creakyknees said:
I scrape my Times quite frequently on my regular bike (the 10 speed) but the way they are shaped it's not usually a problem, just keep riding. Kind of like curb feelers for how far you can pedal thru a corner.

On the track, however, I don't mess around. Pedal strike + steep banking = bad rash. Learned that lesson earlier this spring.

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I've made shoe and pedal contact on the road bike many times during criteriums. The real difference is that a fixed gear keeps the cranks turning, while the freewheel might have a momentary pause or the rider might stop pedaling.

The cranks on my bike are 175s and I have eggbeater pedals. When it hit, I had zero time to react because of the steep angle I committed to.
 

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I've had a couple of pedal strikes on my converted Raleigh, both "terrain" oriented. One was riding the drainage dip in the middle of a speed bump, the other swinging into a driveway. Neither resulted in me going down...whew! The Raleigh has a fairly low bottom bracket and 170 cranks. I'm using the Performance "Campus" pedal, SPD one side, platform cage the other. I took the dremel to the "outside" of the cage, removing it. That gave me a few centimeters more clearance. Since then, no more strikes (but I'm also more cautious.) Lately, I've been running it freewheel for the commute. Less likely to "zone-out" in the dark or just being tired after a long day at work. It's just mellower.

But I've kept the Fuso fixed only. I'm running a single-sided SPD (similar to a Ritchey) with lots of ground clearance, a 170 crank, and a fairly high bb (it is a criterium geometry frame.) So far no strikes, but this is my "fun" bike and I like having to be more alert when riding it.
 

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Dave Hickey said:
It's also why track bikes have a higher bottom bracket height and most use 165mm crankarms
Thats only a half truth. Track bikes have a higher BB because it builds a tigher set of triangles in witch we call "a frame". Co-incidentaly it lends it self usefull to those of us who can still stalk slowly high up on the banking.


As far as crank lengh on track bikes, most racers dont use 165's witch makes it odd that most manufactures would sell out of the box bikes with 165's on them.
 
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