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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hello,

I am looking for a new pedal after falling one to many times due to the inability to turn my foot far enough to release my Shimano SPD-R pedals, the version before the current offering.

Last year I had my leg amputated below the knee and now due to not having an ankle find it difficult to rotate my hip far enough to release from my current pedals. From what I have read I am thinking the Speedplay Zero's may work. X-series pedals most likly will not as I cannot both lift from the ball of my foot and tip my foot on angle ie putting weight on my little toe. I can generate enough twist ie heel moving away from bike to dissengage from a pedal with release angle of say 10 degrees give or take. However the lower the angle to dissenage the better.

Any recommendations on pedals I should look for. I live in Montana so the opportunity to try before I buy is limited. Lastly it is important that I have clipless as I am trying to make the Paralympic cycling team and need a good solid connection to my bike however I do not want to be a liability...toe clips are not an option. Any help is greatly appreciated.

Sam
 

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It sounds as if you have the right attitude to not only make the team but also to excel in the sport. Best of luck to you, let us know how it goes.

In your situation you probably have the best idea as to what kind of pedals will work. The Zeros may be the best choice. Speedplay has a great reputation for customer support, I've enjoyed dealing with them.

Al
 

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wishing you the best also!!

this is a stretch, but Campyonly (www.campyonly.com) did an article on modifying shifters and brakes so that arm amuptees could use them. campyonly may have these guys' contact info, and they may in turn know people who could help you.

it does indeed sound like the zeros might work for you if you set the release angle low. plus they are double sided, so you don't have to flip the pedal over to clip in - I imagine that might be difficult with an artifical leg, and most road pedals will need to be flipped. however, if you have the previous SPD-Rs, you're already used to flipping pedals - unless you're describing the SPD mountain pedals. around what angle do your current pedals release?
 

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Speedplay Zero adjustable float

Al1943 said:
The Zeros may be the best choice. Speedplay has a great reputation for customer support, I've enjoyed dealing with them.
The float on Speedplay Zero pedals can be adjusted to anything from +/- 15 deg. to +/-0 deg. However, any pedal, even those with zero float, will require at least some rotation between "locked" and "release". I don't know how much rotation this is for Zeros, but I believe it is quite small.

I've talked to people at Speedplay on the phone a few times, and they have always be knowledgeable and helpful. I'd recommend giving them a call - their telephone number is on the Speedplay contace web page.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I currently ride on Shimano Road pedals...while the flipping is doable a double side pedal would certainly help in clipping in as I have to depend on muscle memory to find the pedal as there is not sensation for me to use and sense of space is limited considering I have what ammounts to a carbon/ti rod extension of about 14" in length to reach my pedal.

My current pedals disengage somewhere in the 15 to 20 degree range making it difficult to impossible for me subconciously unclip given I have to physically rotate my body and hip to gain this much rotation. I deal for me would be a release angle around 10 degrees or less. I think with that amount of rotation I could again make the subconcious release for emergency reasons.

How low can you make the release angle on the Zero's or any other offerings for that matter? I need very little float on my prosthetic side so increased float is less of an issue for me. However like the option with the zeros of being able to dial in release and float for one pedal and have it entirely different for the other.

Thanks for the encouragment regarding the Paralympics. My biggest challenge right now is getting back to racing shape nearly a year of rehabilitation and limited endurance training has taken its toll but fortunately it is something I can overcome with dedication. Prior to the accident I had raced extensively for 6 years so my base is there. I am blessed to be alive from my accident, caught in an avalanche, and am determined to not be defined by the loss of my leg.
 

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My left ankle is damaged from an old accident. I have a limited range of motion that doesn't affect pedalling, but I can't twist very hard or very far (and I can no longer do the limbo). It is often difficult for me to unclip from my left SPD-SL without standing with my right foot on the ground and rotating my body. It hasn't been a problem in riding-- I only unclip the right pedal at stops. For mountain bike dismounts I'll unclip the right foot and swing it over the bike. Then even standing on the left pedal I can twist my body enough to unclip, and then put the right foot down.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
ericm979....I currently use the same technique you are. However for racing I feel that I need to be able to disengage from the pedal on a moments notice on both sides to prevent any hazards that may arise. Secondly I still ride very technical mountain terrain on my MTB and often do not have the option of comming to complete stop before needing to dismount....but thank you for your insight and and I am happy to hear that your injury has not held you back
 
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