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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm using Shimano SPD pedals right now and am having trouble clipping in. I've only been using them for a couple of rides and know they will get easier. My question is, is there a better pedal to use, I was thinking about getting egg beaters.
 

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Cycling induced anoesis
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If you've only been using that pedal system for a couple of rides, you're not yet through the learning curve. I suggest giving it some time before switching to another pedal.
 

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Can you be more specific about "trouble clipping in"?

For example, I have cheaper SPDs and I sometimes have these issues:
1) Pedal does not hang consistently on the spindle, and it's hard to flip a tiny SPD type pedal over with my toe to get the top of the pedal facing up
2) I have the pedal oriented correctly and my foot is over it in the correct place but it takes a few moments to "find" the sweet spot where it can click in
3) You have everything right but the mechanism resists you sometimes.

Or is your problem something else entirely?

I've been using mine for about 600mi and I've decided to change to SPD-SLs and premium shoes. The issues I have observed with my SPDs were manageable however and I'm sure my new stuff will have a few issues of their own. I still like that my SPD shoes have a recess that allow me to walk without cleat covers, for example.
 

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RoadBikeRider
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Shimano SPDs are great pedals. Give them a chance before abandoning them. You can adjust the release tension but as far as clipping in...just practice and patience...Unless there is something wrong with the pedals or cleats but you didn't give much detail.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
I have trouble getting them to lock in right away, makes it a pain when trying to get across an intersection with traffic around me.

I know that I will get better as I use it more, but wanted to see if there might be a better alternative when I get my road bike.
 

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evilduc996 said:
I have trouble getting them to lock in right away, makes it a pain when trying to get across an intersection with traffic around me.

I know that I will get better as I use it more, but wanted to see if there might be a better alternative when I get my road bike.
Becoming comfortable/ proficient with any pedal system requires a level of patience and some practice. To make a decision to change (or initially go with) a certain pedal system because the learning curve is perceived to be easier or takes less time is IMO, placing a priority on questionable criteria. Choose the system that gets you the benefits you seek long term, because after some time in the saddle practicing, most function well.

Additionally, throwing money at a 'problem' doesn't always remedy things. If you think there's an issue with the cleat/ pedal set up, have your LBS check them, but as I and others have mentioned, take some time to go off the beaten trail and practice before dumping your current system.
 

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IME, Shimano puts some really strong springs in the pedals and advise folks to screw out the tension spring as far as possible to make it easiest to clip in and out. After you get used to the motion, then tighten up a bit at a time. Also, check your cleat alignment as the front has to go underneath and you might be overshooting the front end.
 

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I loosened mine up as much as I could and oil them occasionally. Attaching hardware between pedal and cleat is metal and needs lubing, especially after riding in rain or wet conditions. IMO
 

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evilduc996 said:
I have trouble getting them to lock in right away, makes it a pain when trying to get across an intersection with traffic around me.

I know that I will get better as I use it more, but wanted to see if there might be a better alternative when I get my road bike.
like the others have said, make sure the tension is set low and the components are lubricated a bit. I find that I have to press the clean in at just the right spot to lock in, and I do find that mildly annoying. At an intersection I leave one foot clipped in and use the other to get going at first. Unless your shoes have a very hard midsole you can just put the middle of your foot on the pedal and ride across and clip in later.

David
 

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sjd78 said:
Speed Play pedals are super easy to clip into.
In my experience, after 2 weeks, Speed Plays are still almost impossible to clip into.
Much, much worse than SPD pedals (which can be adjusted). Once in, however, I like them.
 

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Trek2.3 said:
In my experience, after 2 weeks, Speed Plays are still almost impossible to clip into.
Much, much worse than SPD pedals (which can be adjusted). Once in, however, I like them.
Yours are set up incorrectly or you have a faulty set. Mine were difficult for the first 5 clip-ins and have been flawless since. Both LBS' around me push the Speedplay system and most riders around here use them and I have never heard of a problem.
 
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