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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I just ordered my first road bike and I have a question regarding pedals. The LBS I ordered my bike from recomended that I buy another set of shimano spd's, like the ones I have on my mtb, to use on my road bike. I bought a set of shimano 540's and I threw them on my mtb and I am gonna throw my 520's on my road bike. This way I can use the same shoes for both bikes. I wear specialized comp carbon mtb shoes. Do alot of people who ride both mtb, and road bikes do this? Are there any disadvantages to doing this? Any info that you guys can give me will be appreciated. Thanks in advance for any replies that I get here.
 

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I haven't ridden SPD's for a long time but when I first got into road biking I had (and still have) Eggbeaters on my mountain bike so I got Quattro SL's on my road bike so I could use the same shoe (same shoes as yours actually) on both pedals by using the universal Crank Bros cleats. I was happy with that for a while but the comibination begun to feel a little lacking to me, I would ocassionally get hotspots (where you can really feel the cleat with your foot) and even though the shoes only had minimal flex having a carbon sole and all I felt it was still too much flex. Plus I was always in danger of clipping my pedals when cornering.

The Quattro's may have been better had I used the road cleat on road shoes for them but I decided to just go all out and change both shoes and pedals, with Northwave (Tom Boonen Ltd Edition) shoes and Look Keo Carbon Ti pedals. I have only been on a couple of short rides with them but can already notice a difference, sprinting seems easier and it is also a lot more stable when I get up out of the saddle.

I think you will be fine with your combination unless you start doing a lot of long rides on the road bike, you will find that road bike's have a way of dragging you in and never letting you back to the mountain bike, well that seems like what it is doing to me at least! :D
 

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Lots of recreational riders do it that way, so no worries. Main complaints for some is that they want to wear lighter shoes while road biking (mt bike shoes are beefier all over, plus having lugs) and some folks complain about logging long miles on the smaller platform of an SPD pedal. I've never had a problem with either of those things.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks for the replies, sounds like I wont have a prob at all using my mtb pedals. The good part is it gave me an excuse to upgrade to 540's on my mtb. They shed mud better then the 520's so ill throw the old ones my road bike since mud wont be a prob riding the roads.
 

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I have Time ATAC MTB pedals, and used them for my road bikes for a while, but after using them for a while on the road bikes, they would squeak and drive me crazy. Even if I had them torn apart and greased, they would squeak after a short period of time. They never squeaked on my mountain bikes. I had no problem, other than that, using them as road pedals. I decided to switch to "road" pedals, Look Keos, with another pair of shoes so I would not have to put up with the squeaking. I have been riding with them for a couple of months, and like them except for the fact that they are one sided, and the clip always flips over, therefore they a pain to clip into, which can be dangerous in traffic. Mountain cleats are also easier to walk in when you are off the bike. I would say the mountain pedals would be fine with the road bike.

If you do decide to go with road pedals, be sure do get double sided (clips on both sides) pedals.


John B.
 

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I have only put about 20 Miles max on my Keo's so far with previously using only double sided pedals but even though I have had some trouble clipping in on the one sided Keo's it really hasn't been that bad and I had a decent success rate.

I think the trick is to use the top front of your toes to reach back to the loopy bit of the pedal, rotate the pedal around, then it flips around your shoe, then you just slide the cleat in and press down to clip in. I just need to perfect that process a little more...

With anything though there is a learning curve so I wouldn't rule out one sided pedals just because of that.
 
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