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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Looking at these two flooring options for a cabin

Pergo Outlast+ Applewood 10 mm Thick x 5-1/4 in. Wide x 47-1/4 in. Length Laminate Flooring (13.74 sq. ft. / case)-LF000885 - The Home Depot

vs

Home Decorators Collection Strand Woven Harvest 3/8 in. Thick x 4.92 in. Wide x 72-7/8 in. Length Click Lock Bamboo Flooring (29.86 sq. ft. / case)-HL270H - The Home Depot

Was leaning toward the bamboo til I started reading comments that it scratched easily. I was able to confirm this somewhat by attacking the sample with my keys (the Pergo was very tough). It's a cabin so dogs, kids, snow, water, etc...

Thoughts?
 

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Master debator.
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Check out vinyl plank flooring also. Pergo would probably be good for what you are doing with it.
 

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half-fast
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LVT doesn't feel so clicky when walked on. There's also some cool design flexibility with it. Also it can get wet and not go all to pieces. Give it a second look.
 

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What the what???
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LVT doesn't feel so clicky when walked on. There's also some cool design flexibility with it. Also it can get wet and not go all to pieces. Give it a second look.
Yeah... don’t do laminate. I made that mistake. Great for scratch resistance, but even a little water left for any length of time makes it swell at the joints and once it does, it stays that way. Never again.
 

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gazing from the shadows
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How much traffic? Snow would be a problem if it melted into the laminate. Water and laminate don't go together well, though the newer stuff allows a good amount of time to get water up. I've heard of people coating the laminate with poly or epoxy paint, but that seems silly to me.

Are you doing EVERYTHING, or just part of the cabin?

What's down for flooring now?

DIY or pay someone?

Is the cabin nice? Or in a pricey area? Or is it more along the lines of a run down cabin? Keep in mind that laminate adds value like carpet does (so not really) but hardwood adds value as an upgrade. So look for some pre-finished hardwood to compare prices. With pre-finished, the install is fast.

You can find hardwood for a similar price to those two options, btw. But generally you will be paying 3.50-4.00 to start. There are some nice distressed/older looking products out there that would look great in a rustic cabin. But the cost will be quite a bit higher, which might not matter for a 500sq' area, but would for a 1500sq' area.
 

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How much traffic? Snow would be a problem if it melted into the laminate. Water and laminate don't go together well, though the newer stuff allows a good amount of time to get water up. I've heard of people coating the laminate with poly or epoxy paint, but that seems silly to me.

Are you doing EVERYTHING, or just part of the cabin?

What's down for flooring now?

DIY or pay someone?

Is the cabin nice? Or in a pricey area? Or is it more along the lines of a run down cabin? Keep in mind that laminate adds value like carpet does (so not really) but hardwood adds value as an upgrade. So look for some pre-finished hardwood to compare prices. With pre-finished, the install is fast.

You can find hardwood for a similar price to those two options, btw. But generally you will be paying 3.50-4.00 to start. There are some nice distressed/older looking products out there that would look great in a rustic cabin. But the cost will be quite a bit higher, which might not matter for a 500sq' area, but would for a 1500sq' area.
I agree. There's a reason it is/was used for so may years. My 2" Oak floors are nearing a century. You can even go with a lesser wood like Fir and Whitewash (or stain)
 

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Yeah... don’t do laminate. I made that mistake. Great for scratch resistance, but even a little water left for any length of time makes it swell at the joints and once it does, it stays that way. Never again.
That's not the case for all products. I put Pergo in my kitchen and that was a concern. So I put a scrap piece outside, in the rain, and left it there for several months. There was zero swelling.
 

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my wife says there are some that are good laminates for this purpose from Mowhawk Flooring. Interlocked and designed to block out moisture. (she's an interior designer)
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
How much traffic? Snow would be a problem if it melted into the laminate. Water and laminate don't go together well, though the newer stuff allows a good amount of time to get water up. I've heard of people coating the laminate with poly or epoxy paint, but that seems silly to me.

Are you doing EVERYTHING, or just part of the cabin?

What's down for flooring now?

DIY or pay someone?

Is the cabin nice? Or in a pricey area? Or is it more along the lines of a run down cabin? Keep in mind that laminate adds value like carpet does (so not really) but hardwood adds value as an upgrade. So look for some pre-finished hardwood to compare prices. With pre-finished, the install is fast.

You can find hardwood for a similar price to those two options, btw. But generally you will be paying 3.50-4.00 to start. There are some nice distressed/older looking products out there that would look great in a rustic cabin. But the cost will be quite a bit higher, which might not matter for a 500sq' area, but would for a 1500sq' area.
We ended up taking the place down to the studs. Just finished new electrical and drywall. I'm having some local affordable guys do the work. We were gonna refinish the original wood floors which was under the carpet we tore out but this is 70s construction that was never really meant to be finished, and the quote to do that was pretty high. We are starting the tile in the bathrooms and kitchen now. The wood floors will be around 1100 square foot total.
 

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Boobies!
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I would be tempted to go real wood--if you can't find bargains in regular flooring, we did a house a few years ago using a lower grade wood (knots) and paid the pros to finish onsite.

It came out really nice.

I like bamboo though--but the toughest is the 'strand woven'--so essential bamboo fibers plus goop made into planks. That stuff is like iron. Carbonized bamboo is typically the softest, followed by the open cuts where you see the little joint marks. Lots of variation in bamboo quality as well. Just looked back and was surprised that that was what you were looking at--it is usually damn hard.

I don't like Pergo/laminate not because I have lived with it, but we walked through so many bad renovations where it had been slapped down over uneven subfloors with too much cushioning material...
 

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I like bamboo for a lot of applications. But flooring is not one of them. I'd choose the Pergo or similar laminate for a cabin application. I'm not familiar with the vinyl plank material, but it sounds like it's worth a look.
 

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That's not the case for all products. I put Pergo in my kitchen and that was a concern. So I put a scrap piece outside, in the rain, and left it there for several months. There was zero swelling.
I have Pergo everywhere but the kitchen, bathrooms, and bedrooms and the swelling is nasty.
 

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gazing from the shadows
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We ended up taking the place down to the studs. Just finished new electrical and drywall. I'm having some local affordable guys do the work. We were gonna refinish the original wood floors which was under the carpet we tore out but this is 70s construction that was never really meant to be finished, and the quote to do that was pretty high. We are starting the tile in the bathrooms and kitchen now. The wood floors will be around 1100 square foot total.
If you are re-doing everything, then I would suggest going with pre-finished hardwood. Strongly suggest. It's a selling point for the future since people like them so much (good ROI), and nicer to live with until selling.

You are probably looking at 1-2K more for the basic stuff for hardwood for 1100'. You could go higher of course if you want wide boards or exotic wood, but for a total cabin remodel I doubt that extra cost will break the bank for you.

The labor for refinishing is huge, as is the labor for finishing hardwood after install. Prefinished has the same labor, basically, as laminate click together stuff. So pay for the materials in this case, and get a big selling point for the future.
 

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Beetpull DeLite
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The labor for refinishing is huge, as is the labor for finishing hardwood after install. Prefinished has the same labor, basically, as laminate click together stuff. So pay for the materials in this case, and get a big selling point for the future.
Only disadvantage I see to prefinished vs unfinished is the lack of sealing on the edges. Installing unfinished and staining/sealing afterwards should fill in every crack and seam; prefinished leaves those open.
 

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Only disadvantage I see to prefinished vs unfinished is the lack of sealing on the edges. Installing unfinished and staining/sealing afterwards should fill in every crack and seam; prefinished leaves those open.
I've used pre-finished twice and unfinished once. I don't think very much sealer or topcoat gets down to the edges of the flooring. I don't see an advantage in using unfinished hardwood flooring. The pre-finished is so good.

The pre-finished is more labor to install than click together laminate. My current pre-finished hardwood required a flooring nail gun. Not a big deal, but more labor than the click together style.
 

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Laminate in my living room and kitchen. Looks good, was affordable. HATE it. Floor was level, used recommended padding, and it's loud as hell, especially my dogs claws walking around. Holds up to her claws, no marks but noisy. And you cannot make it shiny. Tried all kinds of different products and just cannot get it to shine. You clean it, and while damp, it looks fantastic. Once it dries, it's kinda dull. We have spilled water and things on it with no swelling but we also cleaned up right away. To do it over again? Vinyl or real wood. We have stick down vinyl tiles in the kid's bathroom and they have been great. Super easy to install, durable, and low cost.
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
If you are re-doing everything, then I would suggest going with pre-finished hardwood. Strongly suggest. It's a selling point for the future since people like them so much (good ROI), and nicer to live with until selling.

You are probably looking at 1-2K more for the basic stuff for hardwood for 1100'. You could go higher of course if you want wide boards or exotic wood, but for a total cabin remodel I doubt that extra cost will break the bank for you.

The labor for refinishing is huge, as is the labor for finishing hardwood after install. Prefinished has the same labor, basically, as laminate click together stuff. So pay for the materials in this case, and get a big selling point for the future.
Can you give me an example of the pre-finished hardwood? Is this the kind of thing Home Depot sells?
 

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half-fast
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