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Hey folks,

So I looked around for a bit, but didn't see any questions like this, so figured I'd pose it. I recently got back into biking, and while I'd for the most part like to get out and ride, sometimes my time or schedule makes it a bit more limited.

So I'm road riding with a recently replaced (stolen) bike, but have a mountain bike as well. I'm looking to increase my fitness so I can start doing longer distances, but I'm often getting home after dark, and I live in CA, so riding at night isn't high on my list with the terrifying drivers around here. ;) (I know, I know, rule #5!)

Rather than putting my road bike on the trainer and wanting to have a second skewer or 2nd rear wheel/tire for it...are there any reasons why a mountainbike isn't good to put on a trainer? I realize the geometry is different, and I'd probably need to get a fat road tire, but this would simply be to get a workout when it's feasable, and just leave it on there for when I can't get out for a actual ride.

thanks!
 

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I use a dual sport Trek on my trainer and put 1700 miles on it over the Winter, it worked fine for me. It's not a mountain bike but it has similar geometry to one. I get great workouts on it including endurance (over 2 hours on occasion) and intervals. It's not as good as having a road bike on the trainer I'm sure, but it works fine.

On the other hand, there's no reason you can't leave a trainer skewer in the bike while you are riding on the road that I know of.
 

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Other than knobby tires not playing all that well with trainers (as you know), there are no reasons why you couldn't train effectively on your mountainbike. With a bike clamped to a trainer, bike handling skills can't be trained anyway regardless of what kind of bike you put on a trainer. And if you rarely ride on the drops of your of your road bike, your position on a mountainbike might actually be closer to your road bike position than you think.

For that matter, a radically different position from time to time isn't necessarily bad either. Just as an example: sitting bolt upright and pedaling hard (especially with platform pedals), your quads do almost all the work. And there's nothing wrong at all with isolating the quads every so often and giving them a burning workout.
 
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