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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm considering purchase of a '72 PX-10 that represents a component upgrade (and a more appropriate frame size) over the PX-10 (tubular rims & tires) that I've had since '71. I love the ride of my old frame, too small though it's always been, the flex in the front fork particularly that gives an exciting ride over moderately bumpy surfaces. I can't claim to do a lot of long-distance riding anymore, because my 60-year old joints can't take too much pounding and compression, so a little 15-mile tour is the most I've done since I started riding again recently. Another short-coming of this bike is it's inability to downshift under load, like going up a hill. So this raises the question: over the long term, will I come to appreciate sufficiently the advantages that modern bikes have over this vintage frame to justify laying out significantly more cash? I'm thinking I'd be willing to spend $1500-2000 (if there were enough improvement in ride that I ended up riding more ) compared with maybe $600 plus whatever it takes to switch out the Peugeot's freewheel and clinchers for a wider-range freewheel and new tubular wheels. When I read reviews of bikes like the LeMond Tete de Course, it's tempting enough to make me consider abandoning the old ride I've become so fond of. It's probably a bit like comparing apples & oranges, but the short test rides the shops allow don't really tell me much about how I'll feel after I've put a few hundred miles on it. Thanks in advance for any suggestions you might have.!!
 

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If you're willing to spend $1500-$2000 on a new bike, I'm sure you'll be able to get a ride that is more reliable and more comfortable comfortable than your Peugeot. It probably won't have the soul of your old bike, but it will still be a lot of fun to have a new set of wheels.
 

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Without a doubt you'll find the Lemond or a Trek in the $1500 bracket far superior to the Peugeot. And I say that as a French bike lover.

Another thought is that you could look on Ebay and buy a Vitus 979 with new components on it. That way you could get a great French bike feel for a fraction of the price of a new bike.

Of course you may have to wait for the right bike to show up....
 

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You might want to consider a Salsa Casaroll complete-

Steel frame, much wider range of gears, classic looks.

The LeMonds are great bikes, too, but you'll get a lot less flexibility with the LeMond- tires will pretty much max out at 25s, no rack or fender mounts (most people don't care about that, but just in case).

I've got an old colnago, and I know that exciting ride quality yer talking about- you will probably get something similar with the LeMond.

One other option to toss out there, if you like the LeMonds, check ebay for an old steel LeMond- That's ride just like you want and it'll be a little more flexible- if I recall, my old steel tourmalet would fit 28s easy.

here's a couple beauties...

http://cgi.ebay.com/1989-Bottecchia...ryZ98084QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

http://cgi.ebay.com/LEMOND-SARTHE-6...ryZ98084QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem

http://cgi.ebay.com/Zurich-Lemond-8...ryZ98084QQssPageNameZWDVWQQrdZ1QQcmdZViewItem
 

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Peugeots were known for being very soft, flexy, comfortable bikes. If you buy a new bike, which I think is a better option than another Peugeot, my suggestion is try to find something that has a comfy ride. Bikes have changed dramatically since your Peugeot was new. Generally speaking they're much lighter, better handling, and the components like shifters and clipless pedals are nothing short of remarkable. I'm assuming you may not have used any of these. If you have, I don't mean to be condecending.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks to Buck, whose suggestions I'm still researching, and The Resident Curmudgeon (whereby fulfilling one of society's most important functions). Mr. Versatile - any thoughts on previous responders' specific suggestions, or any of your own? (Those older bikes, with their elegant tubing & curving front forks sure are pretty, though.) Last summer I did try out a couple of clearance bikes, one a LeMond: disappointing, a nice but rather generic ride, maybe because they were themselves kind of basic and inexpensive as these bikes go (though a sticker-shock to me at the time - I'm getting more & more used to the idea that I'll have to lay out some dough.) I'm getting the feeling I may need to spend something on the way to $3k to get something with that kind of a fun ride.

Thanks again for your input.
 

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I never gave up my old steel bike when I upgraded to more modern machines. I've ridden a number of Cannondales and currently have a Six13 with Record 10 components....

BUT, over the past few years I've been bitten strongly by the retro bike bug. Currently my stable holds nine bikes; seven of 'em are vintage (tubular wheels, friction shifters, older Campy gruppos).

My point is: why not have both? Keep your PX-10, or upgrade to the other PX-10. Then go buy a newer bike. And, hey, new used is OK too. You could probably score a recent model Trek or Lemond, in the sugg. retail range of around $1500, for about $700-$800 or less. (BTW, my first "real" lightweight road bike was a PX-10. It got stolen in '72 and I still miss it)
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
You mean I can have my cake & eat it, too? Honest? Really? I'm new to this forum but I'm liking it a lot. Now I can go tell my wife that I was told I'd better upgrade the old AND buy the new/used, or I'll - what can happen if I don't - maybe come down with aprb'p-wmfguumakvlweebish fever, which invariably results in death within 102 years.
Truly, though, it does make sense, I think I'll consider that.
 

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Bill Silverman said:
I never gave up my old steel bike when I upgraded to more modern machines. I've ridden a number of Cannondales and currently have a Six13 with Record 10 components....

My point is: why not have both? Keep your PX-10, or upgrade to the other PX-10. Then go buy a newer bike. And, hey, new used is OK too. You could probably score a recent model Trek or Lemond, in the sugg. retail range of around $1500, for about $700-$800 or less. (BTW, my first "real" lightweight road bike was a PX-10. It got stolen in '72 and I still miss it)
That's what I did. I need a lightweight, Ergo 10s to stay with my training group, but when I ride alone I almost always ride 25 year old steel frame fixed gear. The odd thing is, except for long downhills, the fixed gear is almost as fast for most trips as the 10s. Maybe it's faster because I don't have the choice of leaving it in a low gear. If you count the reduced maintenance time for a single speed, my commute is faster on the fixed gear.
If you ride in a competitive group, you need to ride whatever the strongest riders in the group have. That means 10s. If you ride alone, 6s friction shifters are just as good, or better in many ways, and not noticeably slower.

em
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Have finally gotten to do a bit of research and am trying to keep my head from spinning from all the choices. Am thinking that I may hold on to the peugeot or do the larger-frame-upgrade if I can get through the French-thread/compatibility thicket, but have been sold on the idea that I could get something very close to that feel, but with better shifting and handling by getting something newer . So thanks for all your specific suggestions, and thanks especially for those links! I'm a little trepidatious about buying a bike (i.e. ebay) without trying it out, so I've been calling around to the various LBSs (boston area) , but of course nobody has even half the bikes I'm looking at in stock. buck, I'm assuming that, when you said the lemonds might limit me to 25s that you meant specifically the tete de course, since you went on to mention the toumalets as being able to take up to 28". (Having read some negative reviews of the frame quality, to say nothing of the unnecessarily (for my purpose, it's now clear) high pricetag, I've pretty much ruled out the tete de course, anyway.) I'm 6'0" and have to be careful to avoid too small a frame size so that, after 2 surgeries, I don't overload my knees. Anyone with further suggestions for tourmalet vs sarthe vs vitus 929 for something fast & precise but still with that nice flexy feel for fun and for vertebrae preservation in case I need them for later in life? Thanks so much for all your help & suggestions (nice how things can come full circle when people are doing what they love - I'm returning the advice-favor on a camping-and-travel-forum thread.)
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Dunno if this is a question more for another thread, but anyhow...Can I obtain relief for my knee-straining by switching out the Peugeot's 45 chainring (other is 52) for a 42 or 39? (The rear is a 14-48). Thanks again for your help.
 

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If you're having knee problems, you might need to change how you sit on the bike a bit. This is where buying a new bike might come in handy - if you find a shop you trust, they should be able to properly fit you to a new bike. Describe where the pain is and hopefully it can be remedied.

Supposedly the Specialized Roubaix bikes are comfy, if you want to spring for full carbon.

I'm with the others, though...you should at least keep your old Peugeot, and grab another one in better shape if you'll ride it and it'll keep you happy. I alternate between my modern Jamis steel bike and my old '77 Raleigh fixed gear. I couldn't think of getting rid of either one.
 

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From memory the crank in the PX-10 was Record and would only allow a 45 on the early versions and only went down to 42 on the later versions.

To tell you the truth - a Shimano 105 setup with a triple would be vastly superior but the cranks presents the problem of French threads. So you require a Phil Wood bottom bracket and, say, http://www.rivbike.com/products/list/cranks_bottom_brackets#product=12-190 a Sugino crank that is one of those perfect cranks that ought to be used everywhere.

Oh, that's right - it doesn't have a 53 tooth big ring so most people won't buy it.
 

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From a 61 year old

Chuck, I bought a Colnago Classic with a 13-29 10 speed rear, 53/39 crank and have to say I think I can ride as long and nearly as fast as I did 30 years ago when my ride was 5 speed Fuji finest. I would put that Puegeot on the wall. The new equipment allows us with worn knees to still ride at a decent clip.
 

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Chuck, when comparing old to new, be sure and ask if the poster has actually done significant miles on both types....

I have - started on Raleighs in the early 80's. I still like the ride of steel better, and for some other reasons (esthetics, durability, made in USA etc).

That said, the PX-10 was never a top of the line bike; I recall it being marketed as the best "entry" racer of the day, which would put it in the sub $750 or less range today. And it did have a reputation as being flexy.

$1,500-$2,000 will get you a really nice bike. Period. You need only choose a color you like and make sure it fits. If I were you I'd also look for either a compact crank (usually 34-50 front instead of 39-53) or a triple front for the granny. Plus since everything is 9 or 10 cogs in back, you can go 13-26 in the back and get very low gears even with a double front.

The other thing I'd recommend is checking frame / tire clearance. A 28 width tire running 95 psi is a lot more comfy than a 23 running 115, and it'll handle bumps better and not flat as often. But many bikes wont fit a 28 so you have to check by actually installing the tires and pumping them up.

The shfiting systems are really reliable when shifting under load; so no worries there.

Finally, ask for a "comfort road" geometry. It's marketing code for "higher handlebars" and comes in handy if you're not 22 anymore.

Keep your Peugeot if you have sentimental value, or ebay it if you don't. There are plenty of collectors out there.

-Creak.
 
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