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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Pretty cool little system here. Tire lever is on point. I'm tired of tire levers breaking. Bottle opener and valve core remover are a plus.
http://kck.st/1Po2Moy
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
PBL450,

Thanks for fixing my link. Not trying to be shill just showing some new product.

Does that Sticky Pod fit in your jersey pocket or is it meant for a hydration pack? I think I saw that product on Bikerumor awhile back.
 

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PBL450,

Thanks for fixing my link. Not trying to be shill just showing some new product.

Does that Sticky Pod fit in your jersey pocket or is it meant for a hydration pack? I think I saw that product on Bikerumor awhile back.
They make a small and a large. Both fit comfortably in your jersey pocket. I prefer the small. Not nearly as classy looking as the one you posted but affordable and functional.

Sticky POD ? Small/ Large | The Gear Nuts
 

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love my sticky pod. I learned about it on here. nice thing is, it is way inexpensive but does the job better than a seat bag imho (easier to access the well organized innards)
 

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I'm not sure how that large Sticky Pod thing works better than a seat bag. After looking at it and watching the video I would rather stay with a seat bag in my opinion of course.

Who needs separate Allen wrenches when they make mini tools that have all those same Allen tools plus more which the Pod doesn't have, and a mini tool can't be used with the Pod because it wouldn't fit. If I was into CO2 I would have no problem putting one of those systems in my seat bag along with a spare tube and other assorted stuff I carry.

Valve core remover? I've never had to use a valve core remover while riding in over 40 years of riding, not sure why I would want one of those along, nor have I had the need to use a bottle opener in that same length of time and if I did need one the store has them to borrow. Today's world we have cans with pull tabs...heck even 40 years ago we had cans with pull tabs! And the idea of a tire lever made of steel with a plastic outside? Soma has been doing that for years.

My phone easily fits in my seat bag and my bag is water resistant. In fact the Sticky Pod, while it did have a water resistant case for the cell phone everything else will get wet because the Pod doesn't seal the sides shut, not so with most seat bags.

I just don't see anything revolutionary with the Pod as is claimed by the creators.

I know, I'm a party pooper, sorry guys.
 

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I'm not sure how that large Sticky Pod thing works better than a seat bag. After looking at it and watching the video I would rather stay with a seat bag in my opinion of course.

Who needs separate Allen wrenches when they make mini tools that have all those same Allen tools plus more which the Pod doesn't have, and a mini tool can't be used with the Pod because it wouldn't fit. If I was into CO2 I would have no problem putting one of those systems in my seat bag along with a spare tube and other assorted stuff I carry.

Valve core remover? I've never had to use a valve core remover while riding in over 40 years of riding, not sure why I would want one of those along, nor have I had the need to use a bottle opener in that same length of time and if I did need one the store has them to borrow. Today's world we have cans with pull tabs...heck even 40 years ago we had cans with pull tabs! And the idea of a tire lever made of steel with a plastic outside? Soma has been doing that for years.

My phone easily fits in my seat bag and my bag is water resistant. In fact the Sticky Pod, while it did have a water resistant case for the cell phone everything else will get wet because the Pod doesn't seal the sides shut, not so with most seat bags.

I just don't see anything revolutionary with the Pod as is claimed by the creators.

I know, I'm a party pooper, sorry guys.
I carry the two most common Allen wrenches because they are light and easy. I don't carry a mini tool because they are heavy. I don't want a saddle pack. I don't think my Sticky Pod is revolutionary, I think it's an affordable and convenient way to carry what I need. I don't even put my phone in it and I've ridden in the rain and never had big issues with things getting soaked. But I don't head out in the rain intentionally very often, usually I'm just getting caught... I don't know that it works "better," but I like it better. Mostly for aesthetic reasons.
 
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I carry the two most common Allen wrenches because they are light and easy. I don't carry a mini tool because they are heavy. I don't want a saddle pack. I don't think my Sticky Pod is revolutionary, I think it's an affordable and convenient way to carry what I need. I don't even put my phone in it and I've ridden in the rain and never had big issues with things getting soaked. But I don't head out in the rain intentionally very often, usually I'm just getting caught... I don't know that it works "better," but I like it better. Mostly for aesthetic reasons.
I've ridden for years out in remote areas, some areas so remote there is no cell service and to walk back could be a 50 mile hike, so I don't want to be caught with some sort of breakdown requiring tools other than an Allen to fix, so the slight weight penalty of carrying a mini tool is nothing in fact I don't even notice it and I carry the Park MTB3, not to mention my tire tools and a small folding pair of pliers along with my other assorted stuff. Heck when I use to ride in mountains I even went as far as to carry a spare tire! Overly cautious? perhaps, but I rather be over prepared than under prepared. Also I'm not the kind of person who rides with minimal stuff than call my mommy...err wife to have come get her little boy...err husband, to come and rescue me, my wife is my wife not my mommy and I'll do whatever it takes to get back on my own. Of course if something major happened and I was going to be late due to a malfunction then I would call her so she wouldn't worry about why I won't be returning by the time I said I would.

I know that sounds harsh to a lot of modern males but that's how I treat my wife...like a wife, maybe that's why we've been married for 35 years?
 

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If you break a tire lever, you are doing it wrong.
Not necessarily, there are a few tire and rim combinations that can be real pain to put on, but mostly what you said is true. Narrow wire beaded tires with stiff sidewalls like the Specialized Armadillo can be quite a struggle to get on, which is why when I use to use those tires I carried the VAR tire lever VAR RP42500 tyre tool review - BikeRadar USA It was the only tire lever that worked with those tires and my rims.
 

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I've ridden for years out in remote areas, some areas so remote there is no cell service and to walk back could be a 50 mile hike, so I don't want to be caught with some sort of breakdown requiring tools other than an Allen to fix, so the slight weight penalty of carrying a mini tool is nothing in fact I don't even notice it and I carry the Park MTB3, not to mention my tire tools and a small folding pair of pliers along with my other assorted stuff. Heck when I use to ride in mountains I even went as far as to carry a spare tire! Overly cautious? perhaps, but I rather be over prepared than under prepared. Also I'm not the kind of person who rides with minimal stuff than call my mommy...err wife to have come get her little boy...err husband, to come and rescue me, my wife is my wife not my mommy and I'll do whatever it takes to get back on my own. Of course if something major happened and I was going to be late due to a malfunction then I would call her so she wouldn't worry about why I won't be returning by the time I said I would.

I know that sounds harsh to a lot of modern males but that's how I treat my wife...like a wife, maybe that's why we've been married for 35 years?
Wow, you have a lot of your masculinity wrapped up in not calling for a ride... That's cool, whatever floats your boat. Not me though. I had to call for a ride once in the last two years. I just checked with my wife to see if it effected her perception of my masculinity and she didn't remember it. I'm clearly less of a man. I'm resolved to that. I live in NJ, if I don't have good cell reception it's because I'm too close to a sensitive target site. Which I do ride through, but I can also walk a little bit and my phone will work. I'd much rather ride light most of the time than carry the LBS around on every ride. Plus, if I'm far away and else fails, AAA picks up cyclists in my region. By your rules I don't even become a woman if I use them because I didn't call my mommy/wife (that confused Freudian thing warrants a professional consultation, but I'm not at work and I'm not offering). Good luck out there, I find it comforting to know that if your steel frame cracks you will have a welding kit handy in your 65lb. saddle bag. I pasted in a link to a good price for some of your on-board tools:

X-Tools Bike Tool Kit - 27 Piece | Chain Reaction Cycles

Enjoy!
 

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Carry an LBS around! that's funny. I seriously doubt that a Park MTB3 qualifies as a completely tooled LBS wrapped into one neat little package.

Masculinity? no, it's more about how to treat a woman the right way.

I use to live in Los Angeles so I know the big city thing, but back in those days cell phones were in their infancy so I grew accustom of not calling my wife, we all had to fix our crap on the road so we had better bring stuff along to be able to do that. Back in those days we didn't have mini tools either so we had to carry loose tools, talk about feeling like you were carrying an LBS around! We were able to buy small sized tools so it wasn't really that bad.

I remember riders on occasion had to stuff tires with grass and or leaves because they blew a tube or a tire and had no replacement and would ride back with a stuffed tire! Yes that actually worked, though you didn't want to try any high speed maneuvering like that but it would get you home or to an LBS to buy a tube or tire. We just had to work with whatever we could find if we didn't carry it.

There was a guy that broke his aluminum frame and found a stick that fit nicely inside one end and he forced the other end of the broken frame onto the stick, then wrapped duct tape he got from a gas station around all of that and rode it home. Today a frame situation I would probably just call my wife and call it a day, but that sort of event is extremely rare, most events that occur on the road can be handled with a few simple tools included in mini tools and you can be rolling again. For example if a chain breaks it's no big deal to remove a link or two and rejoin the chain and ride if you have a chain tool, you don't even need to carry a spare link so there's part of the LBS you don't need to take with you!

It use to be with older style 32 to 36 spoke rims if you broke a spoke you could simply twist the offending spoke around another and adjust the other spokes with a handy dandy spoke wrench and ride on home, but today's low spoke count wheels that may not be possible so you may be calling home if the wheel tacos on you from a broken spoke.

Today's bicycle world has given us less opportunity to fix stuff on the road which of course means more opportunity to have to call for help.
 

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pros and cons to all the alternatives

I just found that all the seat bags I have used are clumsy. Usually hard to get at the stuff stuffed and crammed inside them, while the sticky pod folds open like an organized tool kit. Have to bend over to access the seat bag if it is a pain to remove, and when you open the attached seat bag it pukes its guts over the dusty ground.

nice to walk into a coffee shop and have my valuable on me instead of strapped to the bike.

a lot of seat bags have pita straps threaded up and over the rails. ugh

hate feeling the weight of the bag when out of the saddle too, or when carrying the bike

but these are minor niggles .. on my gravel/adventure bike I actually have a very substantial Moots Tailgator modular bag system attached to me seat post - does wayy more than a seat bag or pocket pod for proving that my manhood outdoes any seatbagger .. jk

I thought the main point to the Sticky Pod is to have a grab and go kit that you can use with your whole fleet of bikes. 8 bikes, one kit
 
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