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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After seeing all the impressive photos posted here, I figured you guys might be able to help me with my problem. All my landscape photos come out washed out... too much white haze. I'm using a Nikon D60 with a couple different lenses. The portrait, close-ups/macro, indoors stuff I shoot looks great in color richness and detail, but my daytime outdoors landscape/distance stuff is horrible... an example below (it was a clear, non-hazy day despite the photo).

What do I need to adjust beyond switching from Auto to Landscape mode? Neither of those modes seems to do justice to the landscapes. Even my crappy 5MP pocket camera does better.

(I did RTFM, but I don't understand wtf it's telling me.)

Please advise, camera-savvy RBRers:)
 

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Resident Dutchbag
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Taking pictures in the middle of the day will do that. Try taking pictures early in the morning or when the sun is going down.
 

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shoot in Av mode (canon) I know Nikon has it aperture priority that picture's white balance is off, as well as being over exposed see how everything has a bluish hue?

check out this awesome book explains what a correctly exposed picture is compromised of and what the big 3 do (aperture, shutter speed, and ISO)

"Understanding Exposure" by Bryan Peterson

http://www.amazon.com/Understanding...=sr_1_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1280299098&sr=8-1

What's the point in having a a DSLR if you shoot in auto?

Chad
 

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Jerkhard Sirdribbledick
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If you're shooting in Auto mode, then where you aim the camera will dictate how the camera meters and exposes the scene, so be cognizant of that. When I shoot in full auto (using a P & S, for instance), I usually aim the camera at a somewhat darker part of the picture so that the rest doesn't get overexposed.

Plus, in the pic you posted, there's that huge swath of shadow on that hillside and it looks like that threw off the metering.

I agree with Nimitz ... try going out of Auto and shooting in manual or one of the aperture/shutter priority mode.

Understanding Exposure is a good book ... but here's the abridged version: Shoot in aperture priority, turn on spot metering, aim at the brightest spot in the frame, half-press the shutter button to meter for those highlights, re-compose the shot and fire away.

However, since I don't believe the D60 has an AF-On button (dedicated focus button), the half-shutter will auto-focus and meter, so you're probably better off shooting in full manual. Which case, you follow the above steps just the same except you don't half-press the shutter button to set the exposure. With spot metering on and the camera aimed at the brightest spot in the frame, you set the exposure yourself, then re-compose and shoot.

As you get a little more experienced, you'll get better at choosing which highlights can afford to be blown and which can't ... in other words, you'll get good at knowing where in the frame to spot-meter.

You also might want to double-check that you don't have your exposure compensation jacked up. Make sure it's at 0.

Also, shoot in better light.

Thread. Jacked:

<img src="https://www.itsjackson.com/Jackson/2010/july-2010/DSC1183/946333337_PNNFe-L.jpg" border="4">

<img src="https://www.itsjackson.com/Jackson/2010/july-2010/DSC1195/946336101_r5jr7-L.jpg" border="4">

<img src="https://www.itsjackson.com/Jackson/2010/july-2010/DSC1152/946325732_58rZ7-L.jpg" border="4">

<img src="https://www.itsjackson.com/Jackson/2010/july-2010/DSC1032/922466610_wQo9B-L-1.jpg" border="4">
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Awesome! Thanks, guys. I guess I was expecting too much out of the landscape mode and AUTO mode. Time to stop being lazy and make use of the other priority modes. I had a SLR/film camera throughout high school and college; I'll just need to refresh my mind and figure out how to get the DSLR to get the shots i want. I'll take a look at that book too.

I know I was shooting at a bad time of day (close to noon), but I couldn't work the hike any other way. I think the amount of manipulation to fix the blue hues with PS or Gimp would be too much work. I'd rather learn to get a good photo first then tweak it a little if needed.

My wife and I love the thread-Jack! He's an awesome kid (great photos too)!
 

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Windrider (Stubborn)
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It's over-exposed.

The range between the highlights and the shadows is larger than the range the camera can capture......the camera tries to balance the exposure, which losses the highlights and the shadows.

Roe is right about "understanding exposure".

Len
 

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Premium Member
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21,910 Posts
What Doc said plus filters plus experience plus don't expect much of landscapes taken in the middle of the day.

Filters=circular polarizer and a graduated neutral density ought to do the trick.
 

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Spicy Dumpling
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One more thing that will kill contrast in the middle of the day is lack of a hood. Make sure you have a hood and use it religiously. Not just for the optical advantage but also as protection for your lens itself. And as others have said, get out of the auto modes and learn to use the Av,Tv and M settings. It may take a while but it's the only way to really get the photos that you see in your minds eye.
 

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Goodbye, Pork Pie Hat
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I never tire of getting hints and tips from you pros. Thanks!
 

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Canon Fodder
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All the above. Mid day shooting is a PITA. A GND filter will help but will decrease shutter speed making a tripod a good idea . Spot metering can be iffy. Learn to use full manual mode and buy the book. Also if your camera has AEB (auto exposure bracketing) learn ti use it, it has saved many a shot for me.
 

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NeoRetroGrouch
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If you are going to shoot mid-day, you NEED HDR. Shoot RAW. Bracket the exposure with at least three shots (-2 (underexposed), 0, +2 (overexposed)) and download the free trial of Photomatix. A single shot in RAW can also be run through Photomatix for a pseudo-HDR. Do you have the original in RAW?

BTW - The shot does do well in capturing some detail in the heavy sharow area.

TF
 

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Frog Whisperer
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DrRoebuck said:
Also, shoot in better light.

Thread. Jacked:

pictures of your boy ALWAYS make me smile......that SEG of his is highly contagious

Eric
 

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you don't HAVE to shoot in RAW, but if you don't you should keep in mind that shooting .jpg is like shooting slide film. You need to get exposure right in camera at shutter release so get your exposure basics down: bracket, use filters, and keep practicing.

It sounded like you don't want to mess around with post processing too much so that's how I directed the above. If you start to get into it then by all means shoot raw. You'll get more exposure information that can be manipulated non-destructively (in lightroom at least, I don't know about other programs).
 

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Seat's not level
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I use a polarized filter when shooting daytime landscapes. It makes the blue sky blue. Without it, it's kind of what you got.

Shot with a D50...
Not a landscape, but the filter is on and the blue sky is blue.
 
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