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Does anybody here know (or know of a site/etc. that lists) the order-in-range and tubing used on Pinarello steel frames in the 1990's?

I cannot find much info on the 'net.
Even Classic Rendezvous doesn't have their Pinarello page up!
The Sachs/Bulgier catalog collection stops in 1989.

It seems the order in 1989, as far as I can gather, was:
1. Montello (lugged, Columbus SLX)
2. Treviso (lugged, Columbus SL)
3. Cadore (lugged, Columbus Cromor)
4. Veneto (lugged, Columbus Aelle TreTubi)
The lower end models look like they used Oria tubing.

I can't find where the Radius (filet brazed), Vuelta, Stelvio, etc. fit in (I suppose some of these models are name changes for those above or vice versa).

As far as the tubing, I suppose that changed over time too, as I'm pretty sure Pinarello used Columbus and also Dedacciai (Dolmen, Kens) proprietary tubing, I think.

Any help appreciated.
 

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Hello,

I don't have this info, but also am very interested because I recently aquired a Pinarello frame that I've attached an image of to this post. It is built of Dedacciai Kens and I believe its model name is the "Stelvio" from 1998.

Please share any infomation you gather, I will try and hunt somoe down on my end too. But I'm new to road bikes and am not sure where to look (besides google), do you have any suggestions?

Thanks!
 

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By the late nineties the Dolmen tubing was used on the Asolo. It was a lower end bike - mine has 105 9spd.

Despite being 'low end' the workmanship is insane!
 

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Could you guys maybe identify this frame? My girlfriend is thinking of buying it for around $300CAD and I'm wondering whether this is a good deal (all the attached componentry should be included)

 

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It turns out that the frame is a Pinarello Asolo likely from 1991 or 1992 based on the 1990 world championship sticker at the top of the downtube. I built it up for my girlfriend as a single speed (don't kill me, its what she wanted!), and its a real joy to ride. Responsive, poised, great power transmission, stiff and it just looks so fine! I think evetually it may have to end up with a full campagnolo gruppo to match the headset and bb and to give it some slightly longer legs.
 

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vuelta, stelvio, radius

I bought a Gavia back in 1994 and know Pinarello's mid-90s line-up pretty well (as I lived near Treviso and was/am a big fan of Pinarello.

Vuelta and Stelvio are essentially the same bike. Oversize lugged steel. The Vuelta came first and uses Columbus EL/OS tubeset. The Stelvio came out when Pinarello started a big move towards using proprietary tubesets made for them by Dedaccai. So the Stelvio model uses Dedaccai's version of oversized steel tubes that they made under a Pinarello name called Kens. Essentially the same bike.

Radius also used Dedaccai tubeset made under a Pinarello name but was tig welded with the tubes flared into a square shape at the ends. Personnally I prefer the lugged the Vuelta and Stelvio models to the Radius. Much more elegant.

I don't know the exact relationship between Pinarello and Dedaccai, but it seems to be very close. About1995, Pinarello started moving towards all of their bikes being made from "Pinarello" tubesets made by Dedaccai.
 

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bikemoore said:
I bought a Gavia back in 1994 and know Pinarello's mid-90s line-up pretty well (as I lived near Treviso and was/am a big fan of Pinarello.

Vuelta and Stelvio are essentially the same bike. Oversize lugged steel. The Vuelta came first and uses Columbus EL/OS tubeset. The Stelvio came out when Pinarello started a big move towards using proprietary tubesets made for them by Dedaccai. So the Stelvio model uses Dedaccai's version of oversized steel tubes that they made under a Pinarello name called Kens. Essentially the same bike.

Radius also used Dedaccai tubeset made under a Pinarello name but was tig welded with the tubes flared into a square shape at the ends. Personnally I prefer the lugged the Vuelta and Stelvio models to the Radius. Much more elegant.

I don't know the exact relationship between Pinarello and Dedaccai, but it seems to be very close. About1995, Pinarello started moving towards all of their bikes being made from "Pinarello" tubesets made by Dedaccai.
great info.. i have a vuelta and it's tubing is called pinarello something, arx.. not columbus, i'm sure. even the fork is pinarello and 3 letters.
 

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classicbike said:
Absolutely gorgeous frames. My 1st Pinarello was a Stelvio, stolen. I've been on the hunt for a Stelvio for quite some time (56). IMHO one of the most beautiful framesets ever made by any manufacturer.
 

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Stelvio 56cm

rhauft said:
Absolutely gorgeous frames. My 1st Pinarello was a Stelvio, stolen. I've been on the hunt for a Stelvio for quite some time (56). IMHO one of the most beautiful framesets ever made by any manufacturer.
What appears to be a nice NOS Stelvio frameset (56cm, yellow) is available in Europe at www.destockage-velos.com for 350 Euros. Lord, I wish I were 4cm smaller.
 

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waynema said:
What appears to be a nice NOS Stelvio frameset (56cm, yellow) is available in Europe at www.destockage-velos.com for 350 Euros. Lord, I wish I were 4cm smaller.
Very nice! Thanks for the link waynema,
Although I have since acquired 2 56cm Stelvios, I am always appreciative of NOS steel Pinarellos.
For those of us not proficient in francais, perhaps you could translate.


Here's a NOS Stelvio I aquired from a small shop in Milan ealier this year.




 

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My old Pinarelli Stelvio W/ Kens Tubing

I realize that I am way late to add to this thread, but I rode a Pinarello Stelvio made of Kens tubing for years and figured that I'd add to the thread for the record.

I bought mine in 1998 after I found an Italian-Canadian bike shop owner and pinarello fan during a trip to Toronto from the U.S. I'm a large rider...maybe 215 LBS. at the time,
and the owner immediately suggested the Stelvio (Kens tubing) over other models given my build. I think I payed about $900 U.S. for the frame.

It was my first real bike after a few years on a Trek 2100 (nice for about 1000 miles, then it got very soft and flexible). The Stelvio rode very nice, and I always loved that bike. I replaced it as my regular ride in 2004, but kept it in my stable as a winter trainer until 2010, when the seat post collar was damaged beyond reasonable repair.

It started off pleasantly stiff and snappy, but seemed to lose it's pep over time. In retrospect, I got older and heavier and it seemed to become a little flexible by 2006. But then again, bike technology changed and 'stiffer equals better' became the norm.

It was very stable, handled great (quick and racy but not at all twitchey), and was a joy for long mellow rides and short spirited rides alike. It really placed me over the bottom bracket in a nice spot for being aggressive and climbing. I would guess that the seat angle was relatively steep, but the key term is "relative". I could be wrong about the angle, but my next ride was a Merckx and I always felt like the difference in seat angle was huge, with the Merckx being very laid back.

What I liked most about the Stelvio, was that it was clearly a racer. When it came time to get fast and ride to your max, the Stelvio seemed right at home and worked with me. Yet, when I was out strolling on an easy and long fall ride it was also the perfect bike.

I remember the shop owner telling me to be weary of Stelvios made of Dolmen tubing, which is what U.S. imported Stelvio frames were made of. He regarded it as a far inferior bike to the european Kens tubed Stelvios.

Again, over time the bike seemed to break down and seemed less and less stiff each year. That said, I put big miles on that thing (at least big miles for me), a total of about 18,000 until it was replaced as my regular ride. After that, I put about another 1,500 miles on it, and by the time the seatpost collar (integrated into the seatube) went bust, the bike was crapped out for anything much beyond a leisurely Sunday jaunt or the rollers. Keep in mind, I did keep getting heavier (up to about 240 lbs.)

If I could get a new one inexpensively today (2012), I'd buy it. Maybe more for sentimental reason rather than anything else. I'm certain it would still be a decent alternate or fun bike, but it would definitely be heavier than today's steel, and I'm not so certain that it would outperform something like a modern, low-end steel frame made by Gunnar or Jamis. I could be wrong about that, but time marches on and improvements are made.

My current Steel ride (I keep a steel frame in the lineup) is a Pegoretti Marcelo, and the difference between the two is like the difference between a 1980's Volvo and a modern BMW. The 1980's Volvo may have panache (like a Pinarello Stelvio does), but the Bimmer is a real live modern performance vehicle.
 
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