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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I took advantage of the "Unreal Deals" at Unrealcycles dot com and was able to drop almost 2/3 of a pound off of my bike. They gave a swinging deal on Leo carbon clinchers with free Conti GP 3000's and tubes. I swung by and picked some up and the difference is really cool. I've attached some pics. They are 38mm deep and come with cork pads and drop style cartridges if your brakes need a little more reach (mine didn't). The hubs are a private label American Classic and the spokes are Sapim I think. The picture on their site sucks, it looks like the wheels are brown. It's not. It's more like your standard 3k carbon weave. I'll take some more photos and update with a more long term impression later.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Update

These wheels have been holding up really nicely. I've ridden wheels that were stiffer, but the were way heavier and not as aero. Think 32h 3x laced to CXP33's. I've thrashed them on gravel and some really aweful pavement and they have stayed true. The braking is pretty good. Not as much modulation as a machined alloy rim with Kool Stop salmon pads, but they have good power. I switched out the stock pads they came with for some Shimano Dura-Ace cork and that has helped. The stock ones were a little grabby and they had a tendency to have vibration induced squealing. The cork is much quieter, especially after I cleaned the rim if any residue from the old pads. The stock rim strip is okay at best. I eventually got a flat from it shifting, but I usually put FSA strips in anyway, so no big deal. Overall, I like them. I'm still keeping my Open Pro laced to Kings for winter riding, but I've had a hard time pulling these off this summer, even for my deeper section tubulars. They have been pretty good everywhere and seem like a nice compromise between weight, aero, price and ease of maintenance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
So far so good

The front is a pretty small bearing, but it still is turning smooth. The rear hasn't made any noises or anything yet, so I'm happy there. They are a re-labeled American classic. Parts are readily available if I ever need to service them. You can pull the freehub and axle out on the rear super easy for cleaning or bearing replacement. Since it's cartridge bearings, it isn't very hard to pop the old ones out and new ones in. They wouldn't be my first choice for mud bog cross wheels, but I wouldn't be afraid of running them in the wet, either.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Weights

I weighed them on my Park hanging digital scale when I got them. It's pretty accurate, but only reads in tenths of kilograms, not hundredths, so getting a super accurate weight wasn't possible. Anyhoo, they came in at 1.55 Kilos with rimstrips and if memory serves, those little plastic axle end protectors. So I would say somewhere around the 1500 -1550 gram mark. Plenty light for me, especially in a clincher. Any less and I start to worry about flexy, foldy wheels.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The front hub is exactly the same as the Micro 58 that AM makes. The rear is a re-labeled version of the AM hub. I've had it apart for cleaning (mostly to see what the innards look like) and it was exactly the same as the AM hubs I already have. From what I understand, there are a certain number of wheel companies that pay AM to have American Classic hubs put in their wheel sets. Other manufacturers spec an American Classic designed, but not labeled and serialized hub in order to save some money. I think the licensing fees are quite a bit less because AM doesn't have to offer the same level of support they would for a hub with their name and serial number on it. Regardless, the hubs are made in the same factory with the same guts.
 
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