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I am a long time mt biker who has taken up riding road. Is there anywhere i can look to get proper sizing and placment of componenets to make it the most comfortable ride i can have! My lbs sized me a 56 for a cannondale but don't seem to have any more knowledge after the sale. I have a cannondale CAAD 6 frame.

I have set my seat so that my knee is parralell with the top tube when the crank parralell with the top tube. my back really starts to hurt about 15 min into the ride as well as wrist pain and neck pain. i thought this was normal and i would get used to it, but after 6 months it is no better.

any comments on basic sizing would be great!


thanks
 

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The web is a MUT
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Lots of recipies for geometry setup

Not sure about your knee measurement.


Set the seat height so that your heel can rest on the pedal in the bottom position without rocking your hips, then adjust or fine tune it from there. Adjust your fore/aft position so that either the handlebars hide the front spindle or so that your forearm elbow to fingertip touches both the front nose of the saddle and the rear of the handlebar tops. These are just very rough starting points that are fairly easy to set up without any yardsticks, or to get a quick fit for a test ride.

Just do a search on google or someplace like that for bicycle fit, you should get plenty of hits. SheldonBrown.com as well as several of the sponsors of this site have pages on measuring for bike fit.

Welcome to the road crew.
 

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try this...

http://www.coloradocyclist.com/bikefit/

A rough guide for saddle height:

Be sure that you can drop your heel 3-4cm below horizontal with the leg locked out at the bottom of the stroke. The idea is to leave a 10-15 degree angle between the upper and lower leg at the bottom of the stroke, during normal pedaling, with the foot approximately horizontal at the bottom of the stroke. A saddle set too high will cause your hips to rock or you toes to point down at the bottom of the stroke.

Saddle fore/aft position is also important. When adjusting the fore/aft position, remember to lower the saddle .3cm for 1cm that it is moved back (and vice versa) to keep the maximum leg extension the same.

www.cyfacusa.com is another good site, but I couldn't get it to work today.
 

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You're Not the Boss of Me
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Any LBS worth its salt should give you thorough help with your setup, including swapping stems or bars to address reach.

A general rule of thumb is that with your pedals horizontal to the ground (at 3 and 9 o'clock), have someone look at your forward leg. The bony protrusion just below the kneecap should be positioned directly over the center of the pedal spindle (you'll hear this called "Knee Over Pedal Spindle" or "KOPS"). Some folks have personally preferences SLIGHTLY in front or behind, but for the new setup it is definite the right place to start.

Then, if you are feeling too stretched out (if you are locking your elbows, etc) the adjustment probably requires a stem swap to bring the bars back closer to you (assuming your frame is close to the right size).

Also, were are your bars in relation to the saddle? Only the strongest and most flexible riders can tolerate the 3-4 inch drop you see in the photos. Many recreational roadies are more comfortable with a drop of no more than two inches, and there is a school of thought (Rivendell Cycles is a big proponent) that favors bars almost as high (or in fact as high) as the saddle.

Strengthening lower back and abs can help that back pain, as can work on pedal speed (ie., not pushing too big a gear too slowly).

Good luck.
 
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