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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hey all - can anybody give me details on this bike? Frame material? Worth keeping? Worth selling? It's a tad on the small size for me, but I was thinking of getting a longer stem and seatpost if I'm going to keep it (the seatpost is 21.8mm, though, no idea where I'd find one of those!).

It's got a 5-speed rear cluster, by the way...

Cheers... Thanks
 

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Well, it is in very nice shape, but it wasn't a high-end model given the cottered cranks and stamped dropuouts. Those also look like steel rims.

The best source I know of for french parts is harris:
http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/french.html

But, even they don't have french stems or seatposts. At that link, Sheldon Brown does describe how to convert a standard stem for use in a french bike.

You can also try yellow jersey:
http://www.yellowjersey.org/frogstem.html

Are you sure about that 21.8mm seatpost? That is a really small diameter.
 

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Late 70's

These were from the late 70's. They had couple of models with pretty much the same frame, just a few differences in quick release, chrome 1/2 fork, and I guess light components vs steel parts. I'm thinking U0-8
 

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Devoid of all flim-flam
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I'd go even earlier than what revolator says. It has the same brakes and derailleurs as my 1971 Gitane Tour de France. The wingnut skewers and steel cottered crank all point to the same (or even earlier) antediluvian era. I'd be willing to bet the bike is made of generic high-tensile steel, not CroMo.

In any case, a cheaper model, to be sure, but the condition is wonderful enough to make it a keeper. It looks as if it came straight out of a time-warp. I hope your hair is nice and long. Don't forget to roll up that right-side bell-bottom. I hope you wear Earth Shoes. Even Birkenstocks would be too modern for that lovely chariot.
 

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Mapei said:
I'd go even earlier than what revolator says. It has the same brakes and derailleurs as my 1971 Gitane Tour de France. The wingnut skewers and steel cottered crank all point to the same (or even earlier) antediluvian era. I'd be willing to bet the bike is made of generic high-tensile steel, not CroMo.
+1--put together a few of these back in the day...probably is an early UO8, but the whole Peugeot model thing gets confusing.

My original was a generic French "Olympic" c. 1968 with virtually the same spec, right down to the cottered crank and the wing nuts (though I think it had cheaper brakes than the Mafac...)

Use or sell? You would get very little for it even though it is in lovely shape, and these were by no means the worst bikes from the BIkeBoom days in the '70s.
I'd vote for selling to a small friend who wants an old gem, & looking for something bigger.
 

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Aside from those aftermarket 'old school' wingnuts, it's as plain a Peugeot UO-8 as I've seen, albiet one in nearly perfect condition (externally, at least). I used to wrench these lead-sleds when they were new. $149 we charged for them new in the mid 70's. It's probably worth more as a decoration than a bike, so keep it just as it is now. Don't change a thing.
 

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My guess is somewhere between 1966 and 1972 - 1973 at the latest.....

This is what mid-level bikes looked like in the 1960's. Straight gauge carbon steel frames. Lesser quality bikes had hard rubber pedals, cheaper brakes, a cheaper saddle, and maybe fewer gears. The Japanese did to the bicycle industry starting around 1971 what it did to the motorcycle industry in the mid 60's. People have forgotten what bikes were like before the Japanese raised the bar for mid and entry level bikes.
 

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kabuki, panasonic, miyata, fuji

I think in 77 or 76 my parents bought me a $79 Mays department store special with the same plastic simplex derailleur system and shifters. That simplex model was around for a while. Two of the japanese brands that was popping up at the time was more so kabuki with their stainless steel tubes. That was the chit for a little while. Ahh, brings back old memories.
 

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revolator said:
Ahh, brings back old memories.
Not all of them pleasant. I caught a branch with my first Simplex, and totally mangled the cage. Being my father's son I took it apart to straighten. Not being my father, I couldn't figure out how that funny chain thing went through those two sprockets--good thing he could figure out things even when he hadn't taken them apart. The guy who redished the wheel (who later sponsored my brother and I racing) had never seen a dished wheel before, and didn't put the dish back in when he put the new rim on. Oops!

An argument for the later date on the Peugeot is it looks like it has the metal plates on the side of the body--French engineering to prevent the dreaded derailler snap-off..

But we all learned by doing. I remember those crappy Hurets whose mechanism folded inside the outer body that always jammed--and an endless number of forgettable horrible brake mechanisms--side and centerpull--that virtually impossible to set up, and, even if you could set them up, you risked life and limb with.

No wonder Campy looked so good--the competition was just awful!

My favorite, though, was the whole shipment of bikes we received where the lead on the end of the brake cables had been badly cast and was crystalized--hammer the brakes, the lead would pop off, & you were screwed. Good thing we had a habit of torture testing first, and selling later...
 

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It makes you stonger

Yes, my plastic simplex broke very easily and being a young kid, replaced it with the even crappier huret. But, the crappyness of the huret was consistent and steady because it was mostly metal and lasted at least.
 

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My Huret Derailleur, ensconced most regally on my 1963 era Royce Union, spent nearly its entire existence in the smallest, fifth, cog. It didn't make any difference how tight I screwed down the downtube lever, any decent bump would send the derailleur straight to the bottom of the cluster. The rear wheel, meantime, would constantly cant itself to the left, thanks to the fact that my eleven year old fingers were singularly unable to tighten down the wingnuts hard enough.

Then I remember the time I was riding on the school yard and plowed straight into a bench. The wing-nutted front wheel instantly went sailing off into the sunset. Luckily, I was okay. So, remarkably was the fork. And the wheel, too!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
bwana said:
Well, it is in very nice shape, but it wasn't a high-end model given the cottered cranks and stamped dropuouts. Those also look like steel rims.

The best source I know of for french parts is harris:
http://sheldonbrown.com/harris/french.html

But, even they don't have french stems or seatposts. At that link, Sheldon Brown does describe how to convert a standard stem for use in a french bike.

You can also try yellow jersey:
http://www.yellowjersey.org/frogstem.html

Are you sure about that 21.8mm seatpost? That is a really small diameter.

Pretty darn sure - LBS measured with calipers, and I eyeballed it with a measuring tape. Here's a couple of close-ups of the post and what might be a shim. Is it supposed to be there?

Thanks again, everyone, for the wealth of information! It just goes to show what 20+ years of storage in my grandparents' basement can do! I'm thinking of putting the ancient michelin gumwalls back on (they still look great, surprisingly!), and using the bike for occasional rides. I'm thinking that the arrogant roadie might be right - worth more as decoration than anything else. It'd be a shame to lock to a bikerack and scuff up that paint...

Cheers,

T.
 

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Looks a lot like the Pugeot U01 I bought in 1972 (and lost to a thief in 1987). Lots of steel parts, including rims and cranks, plus straight-gauge high-tensile tubing, so not light. Very serviceable bike, though, and that one looks to be in excellent shape. Mine had QR hubs, rather than wingnuts, so this one may be a couple of years older.

If the bottom bracket spins reasonably smoothly, I'd ride it. If it needs any service in that area, you have to face the dreaded cottered crank.
 

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Peugeot used to be commonly referred to (at least in my region) as "Peugeot piles" since their seatpost was so skinny it had no shoulder (it was simply a straight tube) to prevent the seat clamp assembly from slipping down the post until it started causing a hump in the seat... Seat clamps from those days were notorious for slipping.
 

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Dave_Stohler said:
BTW, the frame material was what was called gazer le tuyau.
Gas the pipe? Perhaps le tuyau pour le gaz.
 
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