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This is my 1st post. I ride a steel frame used Jamis Quest for fitness/health 3 times a week on a 17 mile route in a about 1:05. I love the bike but have nothing to compare. My last bike was a Schwin chrome fendered cruiser with saddle bags when I was 10. I a now 72.
Not my smartest move, on an impulsive lark I bid on and to my surprise won a Ebay auction at a great price a really fancy European manufactured endurance bike. It is all carbon - frame, handlebar, seat post, with full Dura Ace components. It also came with fancy DT Swiss carbon fiber wheels with 28mm Schwalbe Pro One tubeless tires.
I thought the fancy carbon fiber wheels were a big plus because I understand that they list for more than $2000, but am now having second thoughts. Some reading shows that they are pretty fragile and there are problems with rim braking.
I am thinking that the new bike with these wheels will be overkill for my relatively short and slow riding. I am worried about being embarrassed if I meet other riders on the road when my ability falls so far short of my bike. I don’t know if the new bike will help me in becoming a more accomplished rider.
I am thinking that I should now purchase more practical aluminum wheels. I am thinking Bike Wheel Warehouse everyday fitness/training Mavic Open Pro Shimano 105 wheels on which I would put 28mm Continental Gatorskins, the same tires I have on my Jamis only 25mm. I could keep the DT Swiss carbon wheels and Schwalbe Pro Ones for potential use in the future if I can become a better rider, or maybe sell them. Am I thinking correctly about the wheels/tires?

 

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Stop worrying and go ride your bike.

You will be in good company riding a bike that is better than your ability (almost all of us are doing that).

Unless you are bombing down long steep windy descents under heavy braking, you are not likely to encounter problems with your name brand rim brake wheels. Just make sure you have the brake pads recommended by the manufacturer. You will need to get used to the braking though, especially under wet conditions, so use some caution until you are accustomed to their response.

If you have your heart set on a set of alloy rims, there are tons of good ones out there. Check in with Dave at November Wheels. He has quite a good selection and builds a really nice wheel.
 

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This is my 1st post. I ride a steel frame used Jamis Quest for fitness/health 3 times a week on a 17 mile route in a about 1:05. I love the bike but have nothing to compare.
This is actually a very good bike. I don't know what wheels are on yours. For 2017, the higher end Quests have Richey wheels, the lower end ones have Alex.

If you are averaging close to 17mph, what's the problem? Enjoy the bike.
 

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First off ... I can barely average 16 mph. Stop complaining about your speed.

Second, i did a lot of research before buying a set of wheels. CF rims stop great---get Black Prince pads (Black Prince | SwissStop) off EBay.

Do Not count on the brakes when wet. They will work, but not as well. You should be fine for the flats, but don't go bombing down mountains in the rain ... or if you do, brake early.

if you plan a wet mountain ride, swap wheels and stop stressing.

Otherwise .... the CF wheels will generally be lighter, more aero, and more responsive.

Also ... there is no such thing as "too much bike." There is no "overkill." You can appreciate what the bike offers at any speed. Every time you want to speed up, you will feel the missing weight.

Also ... forget what other riders think.

There will be two schools: One group will be jealous and complain that you are not worthy of your ride. Well, screw them. This sin't like buying a racing car, where if you cannot drive at 95 % of capacity you are wasting it. A good bike delivers from Zero mph. Those people are jealous and small-minded and failed human beings.

The other group will say, "Bravo, dude. Nice ride. Glad you have it and enjoy it."

I have a bike Way better than I can ride, my CF Workswell with Ultegra. I can go faster on that bike than any of my other bikes because it is light and efficient and well-tuned ... not a Lot faster, frankly, but a little .... but I cannot come close to the maximum capacity of that bike ... or any of my bikes. I could possibly reach the upper performance limit of a Mattel Big Wheel. ...... Maybe.

I bought that frame and built the bike because I Wanted it. I love it. I love all my bikes, but that one is literally a dream come true. If other people think I "deserve" it or not ... I simply do not care. Life is a one-way trip that gets shorter every second. I am not going to waste one second on what ungenerous, jealous, bitter people think.

Tonight I rode my 2014 Dawes ... a $400 bike which is six sizes too small. I have upgraded almost every part of it, and outiftted it to make it fit me ... but it is a cheap frame with not so great parts. However, it is tuned up so tight it works almost flawlessly and I love it. No one will ever tell me I do not deserve it.

To me, the bike is a tool, the product is time well spent. Whatever tool I choose to use, if I can make some good time with it ... if I can create some enjoyable moments of life ...

Seriously, what else is it about?

Some people get it form big numbers ... power, speed, watts ... some people need Strava medals ... some people want good moments of life. Use the tool which helps you create what you want. That is how to deserve that tool.

It is always inspiring to me when I hear about people a bit older than me, outperforming me on their bikes. It makes me realize that while I might never get any faster, I might ... and in any case, I can keep riding. It is possible and folks like you prove it.

Thanks.
 

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Welcome and ride the hell out of that thing. Post some pics if you can figure out the 20 century forum we have here.

Rubber side down at all times Sir!
 

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You will not have a issue with heat unless you lots of hard braking downhill. If you are still worried after reading the responses to your question, I will swap you my wheelset for yours:D
 

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This is my 1st post. I ride a steel frame used Jamis Quest for fitness/health 3 times a week on a 17 mile route in a about 1:05. I love the bike but have nothing to compare. My last bike was a Schwin chrome fendered cruiser with saddle bags when I was 10. I a now 72.
Not my smartest move, on an impulsive lark I bid on and to my surprise won a Ebay auction at a great price a really fancy European manufactured endurance bike. It is all carbon - frame, handlebar, seat post, with full Dura Ace components. It also came with fancy DT Swiss carbon fiber wheels with 28mm Schwalbe Pro One tubeless tires.
I thought the fancy carbon fiber wheels were a big plus because I understand that they list for more than $2000, but am now having second thoughts. Some reading shows that they are pretty fragile and there are problems with rim braking.
I am thinking that the new bike with these wheels will be overkill for my relatively short and slow riding. I am worried about being embarrassed if I meet other riders on the road when my ability falls so far short of my bike. I don’t know if the new bike will help me in becoming a more accomplished rider.
I am thinking that I should now purchase more practical aluminum wheels. I am thinking Bike Wheel Warehouse everyday fitness/training Mavic Open Pro Shimano 105 wheels on which I would put 28mm Continental Gatorskins, the same tires I have on my Jamis only 25mm. I could keep the DT Swiss carbon wheels and Schwalbe Pro Ones for potential use in the future if I can become a better rider, or maybe sell them. Am I thinking correctly about the wheels/tires?

You are nuts!!! Ride the bike, enjoy it. Have fun while you are at it.
With the amount of riding you do those wheels won't even feel it.
Btw. I have a set of Reynolds with over 20k miles on Them. Carbon as a wheel material is solid as long as the manufacturer has done their R&D.
If you want a spare set of aluminum go for it. But don't stop using your new toy because of fear of change and the new technology.
Get rid of the gator skins. The 4000s2 is a better tire for what you do.
And embrace change!!! It is the only constant In This universe.


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 
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