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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I need help deciding between a 60cm or 62cm frame size. I have test ridden both sizes and the 60cm seems more comfortable to me. However, I only rode each size for 20 minutes sprinting through and around parking lots. It felt great and I was immediately drawn to the 60cm. My concern is how it will feel on a long 40 plus mile ride. I'm 6'3", 170lbs, and flexible.
Plus, I don't want to waste money ordering the wrong size bike. :eek:
My LBS said that they rarely sell 60cm to people my size so I am questioning my instincts. Although, my salesman/bikeshop guru, after observing me on both bikes (while riding) and properly sizing me said he'd feel comfortable with selling me a 60cm.

Here is the geometry chart for the Trek Madone I'm looking to purchase:
http://www.trekbikes.com/us/en/bikes/road/madone/madone45/

I would appreciate any input or advice! Thanks!

H
 

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Sounds like you need a 60. Remember you are talking about compact geometry...I'm 6-0, 34.50 cycling inseam and ride a 60cm conventional. I test rode a few bikes also before I made my latest purchase and I could tell from the first pedal stroke which bike fit the best. Good luck with your choice..I'm actually between sizes and fit best on a 59, but Trek makes no such animal.
 

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I am 6' 2" and 180 and have ridden a 60cm Frame for years and love it.
If you are comfortable on both, I would always go with the smaller, stiffer frame.
One man's opinion.
Good Luck choosing.

john
 

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There's a lot of overlap in fit. The 60 cm with 2 extra spacers on the steerer tube, one inch of extra seatpost showing and a 10 mm longer stem gives the same fit as the 62. The 62 will allow you to put your handlebars a little higher which might make riding in the drops more comfortable. I see lots of riders on small frames that never use the drops.

I'm 6'4" and would buy the 64 cm (XL). the 62 cm would work for me. The 60 cm would have too much seat to handlebar drop.

My experience is that a bike slightly on the small side feels better than a slightly bigger bike in the parking lot--they're a little quicker and a little stiffer and your center of gravity is a little lower, but a slightly bigger bike feels better after 3 or 4 hours in the saddle--its a little smoother and a little bit more upright.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Reynolds531 said:
My experience is that a bike slightly on the small side feels better than a slightly bigger bike in the parking lot--they're a little quicker and a little stiffer and your center of gravity is a little lower, but a slightly bigger bike feels better after 3 or 4 hours in the saddle--its a little smoother and a little bit more upright.
This my fear...I agree...I feel more in control with the 60cm but think the 62cm would be more comfortable for longer rides. But, I could tweak the 60cm to ride like a 62cm? Or would it better to have the 62cm?
 

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You could get a stem with a different angle so the bars would be a little higher, reducing the saddle to bars drop.
 

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The important diff is the tt length, The 60cm is 58.6, the 62 is a 59.8. You would have to adjust with a stem/spacer swap. Maybe ask if you can take the bikes out for a longer ride. My LBS let me take mine out for an hour or so. I've ridden bikes that are too large, and bikes that were too small. Neither worked.
 

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Be careful of focusing on how tall you are and what size the bike is.

Taller riders have less consistency is leg to upper body ratios. Smaller sized riders go for 54 x 54 squared and so forth. On larger riders you will see more extremes; long seat tube and short top tube and regular seat tube with super long top tube.

Fit is important and your primary concerns are going to be top tube length, seat tube angle, stack height and head tube length.

A 60 in one make is often nothing like a 60 in another. Not a big deal here because you are looking at the same frame in both sizes.

Although there is a 1.2m difference in top tubes it is actually just a little bit more than that because the larger frame has a slacker seat tube angle. You will have to have a little more setback on the saddle on the smaller frame to get in the same position as on the bigger frame. With all of the different bar choices these days it is easy to adjust for a lot of top tube length with the bars you choose. Make sure you can substitute bars for the ones that come with the bike if you need to. As mentioned you can also use a different stem length - but don't go to short. For sure not under 100mm on these large frames.

The next issue is your drop to the handlebars. A longer ride or a fitter will have to help you with that answer. Please do not get the bars higher by using a large degree stem.

The key is you need to get your saddle in the proper position compared to the BB and pedals, the right reach and the right drop. Do not worry too much about what the frame size is.

I am shorter than you and I ride a 61cm actual seat tube after 4 degrees of slope, a 62.5cm actual after 1 degree of slope and a 5 degree of slope frame that would be 67cm ctc if it was a level top tube. Must be about 62.5cm actual. But since my height is in my legs I have shorter top tubes.

Make sure you have someone competent at the shop to get your reach and drop efficient and comfortable.

Jeff
 

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Well said

jlwdm said:
Be careful of focusing on how tall you are and what size the bike is.

Taller riders have less consistency is leg to upper body ratios. Smaller sized riders go for 54 x 54 squared and so forth. On larger riders you will see more extremes; long seat tube and short top tube and regular seat tube with super long top tube.

Fit is important and your primary concerns are going to be top tube length, seat tube angle, stack height and head tube length.

A 60 in one make is often nothing like a 60 in another. Not a big deal here because you are looking at the same frame in both sizes.

Although there is a 1.2m difference in top tubes it is actually just a little bit more than that because the larger frame has a slacker seat tube angle. You will have to have a little more setback on the saddle on the smaller frame to get in the same position as on the bigger frame. With all of the different bar choices these days it is easy to adjust for a lot of top tube length with the bars you choose. Make sure you can substitute bars for the ones that come with the bike if you need to. As mentioned you can also use a different stem length - but don't go to short. For sure not under 100mm on these large frames.

The next issue is your drop to the handlebars. A longer ride or a fitter will have to help you with that answer. Please do not get the bars higher by using a large degree stem.

The key is you need to get your saddle in the proper position compared to the BB and pedals, the right reach and the right drop. Do not worry too much about what the frame size is.

I am shorter than you and I ride a 61cm actual seat tube after 4 degrees of slope, a 62.5cm actual after 1 degree of slope and a 5 degree of slope frame that would be 67cm ctc if it was a level top tube. Must be about 62.5cm actual. But since my height is in my legs I have shorter top tubes.

Make sure you have someone competent at the shop to get your reach and drop efficient and comfortable.

Jeff

Lot's of good information there. Well written. Bike fit is a science.
 

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Dinosaur said:
Lot's of good information there. Well written. Bike fit is a science.
I agree. jlwdm nailed it.
 
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