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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok so I've had some stupid, low-speed, "I-want-to-get-on-a-sidewalk" crash today. During a "pleasure" ride with a non-biker friend of mine, I had to get on the sidewalk to go on the bike lane. It was rather low (a bit less than 1" high) BUT my angle of approach was too narrow and *BANG* I was down.

With a bruised ego, I got up to look at the damage on the bike. My Rival shifters now have small battle scars. I was wondering if I could hand-polish them to an out-of-the-box look, and if so, what tool should I use to do it?

Basically, I need to be taught on the "how to's" to polishing aluminum.

If at least they were race scars I could be proud of, maybe I wouldn't try to "erase" them. Just maybe. I like clean stuff :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks a lot! After reading though, I think I'll stick with my battle scars for a while :) I don't see myself taking the Rival shifters apart, have the anodizing removed, polish and then rebuild them. It doesn't seem worth the trouble.

Anyway, reading your thread has helped a lot. I knew nothing about metal polishing prior to reading it. I may just sand off the small chips at some point, and use some metal polish on those spots after. The chips are so tiny, after all... 2-3 mm wide, no more.
 

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I've used Flitz metal polish to clean up lots of stainless steel and aluminum aircraft parts. All we ever needed was some Flitz and a rag. It polished off jet exhaust, oxidation, and whatever else seemed to be in the way. Sometimes Flitz can be tough and/or expensive to find, but in my experience it's been worth it.
 
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