Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 20 of 20 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
429 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What level of education is the min., max., & norm (ave.) for a pro cyclist?

a. Less than HS diploma
b. HS diploma
c. Some college
d. 4 year degree
e. Advanced degree (MS, PhD, etc.)

If any riders have advanced degrees, can you please name them & what their degree is in? Thanks.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
777 Posts
You'll have riders like Ekimov, Ullrich, and Voigt who attended their national sports institutions after being selected as cyclists early on in their lives. I would assume they have little academic education as their primary focus is to train their body and not their mind.

Then you'll have riders like Tom Danielson and Chechu Rubiera who has a psychology and mechanical engineering degree, respectively. Danielson attended college in Ft. Lewis, CO and Rubiera studied during races while helping Lance win his TdF. It took Chechu 10 years to earn his degree, but he finally has it.

On average, I think most riders have the US equivalent of a GED or less. Our beloved Armstrong graduated from Plano High School and rest is history.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
104 Posts
Hmmmmmmmmm, why would it matter?

Except that US cycling is a sort of upper-income, high-end, yuppie kind of "gear head" recreational past-time.

As noted herein, European cycling is pretty "working class." But in the USA, cycling is all about alloys, space age fibres, and high-end fitness enclaves, the province of educated, upper middle-class urban professionals who can assert the distinctions between Campagnolo and Shimano.

In Europe it's the kids from the farms and factories who get into cycling. Just like the disadvantaged, minority kids in the US get into boxing and basketball.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
429 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
wzq622 said:
You'll have riders like Ekimov, Ullrich, and Voigt who attended their national sports institutions after being selected as cyclists early on in their lives. I would assume they have little academic education as their primary focus is to train their body and not their mind.

Then you'll have riders like Tom Danielson and Chechu Rubiera who has a psychology and mechanical engineering degree, respectively. Danielson attended college in Ft. Lewis, CO and Rubiera studied during races while helping Lance win his TdF. It took Chechu 10 years to earn his degree, but he finally has it.

On average, I think most riders have the US equivalent of a GED or less. Our beloved Armstrong graduated from Plano High School and rest is history.
Very informative. Thank you.
 

·
Banned
Joined
·
2,843 Posts
wzq622 said:
Then you'll have riders like Tom Danielson and Chechu Rubiera who has a psychology and mechanical engineering degree, respectively. Danielson attended college in Ft. Lewis, CO and Rubiera studied during races while helping Lance win his TdF. It took Chechu 10 years to earn his degree, but he finally has it.
It took Danielson 6 years to get out of college with a degree in communications, and Fort Lewis isn't exactly what one would consider a tough college.

And there's Hamilton, he graduated from CU, you may have left him out because he's suspended for doping though.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,042 Posts
Lance didn't graduate from Plano High

wzq622 said:
You'll have riders like Ekimov, Ullrich, and Voigt who attended their national sports institutions after being selected as cyclists early on in their lives. I would assume they have little academic education as their primary focus is to train their body and not their mind.

Then you'll have riders like Tom Danielson and Chechu Rubiera who has a psychology and mechanical engineering degree, respectively. Danielson attended college in Ft. Lewis, CO and Rubiera studied during races while helping Lance win his TdF. It took Chechu 10 years to earn his degree, but he finally has it.

On average, I think most riders have the US equivalent of a GED or less. Our beloved Armstrong graduated from Plano High School and rest is history.


At 17, he received an invitation to train with the Junior National Cycling Team. Plano Independent School District's school board said that the 42 day leave to train, taken during the second semester of his senior year, would bar him from graduating. Armstrong withdrew from Plano East Senior High School with his mother's blessing and went to train with the team. He graduated from Bending Oaks Private Academy in Dallas the following spring. Armstrong still harbors resentment toward Plano because of this and prefers his adopted home of Austin, Texas.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,699 Posts
cdimattio said:
Fignon was known as "The Professor" both for appearance and the thought that he was a High School graduate.
I seem to remember something about Fignon turning down a place at veterinary college to ride for Renault. His father was apparently a bit annoyed, until 83 and Fignon's first Tour win.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
If you look at the current situation with doping, and listen to the defence these guys tries to pull of after being caught (Hamilton's evil twin, Simoni's cocaine drops etc.) I would say that their mental capacity is equalent to a 6 year old.

So no formal education
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
777 Posts
lancezneighbor said:
At 17, he received an invitation to train with the Junior National Cycling Team. Plano Independent School District's school board said that the 42 day leave to train, taken during the second semester of his senior year, would bar him from graduating. Armstrong withdrew from Plano East Senior High School with his mother's blessing and went to train with the team. He graduated from Bending Oaks Private Academy in Dallas the following spring. Armstrong still harbors resentment toward Plano because of this and prefers his adopted home of Austin, Texas.

thats true. brain fart
 

·
village idiot
Joined
·
19 Posts
I think that Lance attended a bit of community college in Austin as well. I don't have any hard proof, but back when I was commuting to college a professor noticed all of my bike gear one morning in the locker room. He went on to tell me that back in the day he taught at a community college in Austin (I think he taught some form of communications) and had Lance for a semester. He said that for one of their assignments Lance came in and showed the class how to change a tire or something along those lines. I assumed it was a true story, but I've never really had a reason to look into it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4 Posts
I doubt any

Dave Hickey said:
I'd guess most of the Europeans only have a HS diploma...pro cycling is not a white collar sport in Europe...That being said, when you retire in your early 30's there is plenty of time to get an advanced degree
pro from europe would attend any type of University after they retire. The education system is different over here. They usually single out the children almost from the begining who will and won't be going on to a school of higher education, and this is from their test scores. That's the great thing about the USA, if you don't do so well in high school (for whatever reason and there are many), there's always a chance to attend a school of higher learning later on in life.
 

·
Soul Mining
Joined
·
390 Posts
Cowboy-jeff said:
They usually single out the children almost from the begining who will and won't be going on to a school of higher education, and this is from their test scores. That's the great thing about the USA, if you don't do so well in high school (for whatever reason and there are many), there's always a chance to attend a school of higher learning later on in life.
That isn't true for all European countries. It certainly isn't true for the UK.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
38 Posts
I hate to admit it, but most of these guys seem pretty dense, but not American football dense. I guess you have to be to slog it out for three weeks risking your life. On that note, are there any riders you think come across as bright?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
83 Posts
LukeVelo said:
I hate to admit it, but most of these guys seem pretty dense, but not American football dense. I guess you have to be to slog it out for three weeks risking your life. On that note, are there any riders you think come across as bright?
Well, I'm no psychologist, but I'd be surprised if TdF cyclists tested higher than NFLers on IQ/Wunderlich type tests. If fact, I'd contend that it takes a whole lot more brain power to memorize and quickly recall an NFL playbook than it does to execute cycling tactics. Besides, most NFLers have a college diploma. The idiots wash out at training camp, you never hear about euro pro cyclists being cut because of stupidity, just because they don't ride fast enough.

Baseball players on the other hand. . .
 

·
Devoid of all flim-flam
Joined
·
7,364 Posts
Robbie McEwen seems pretty bright. But yeah, just the doping aspect makes you realize how dense those guys can be.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
31 Posts
SHVentus said:
What level of education is the min., max., & norm (ave.) for a pro cyclist?

a. Less than HS diploma
b. HS diploma
c. Some college
d. 4 year degree
e. Advanced degree (MS, PhD, etc.)

If any riders have advanced degrees, can you please name them & what their degree is in? Thanks.
If the push to go to a university in europe is anything like it is here in the U.S., then the answer is probably c.

Watches Dave Zabriskie interview.

Nevermind. a, b at most.
 
1 - 20 of 20 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top