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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I put some Profile Airstrykes on my Madone. The handling was awful, the front end shimmied so bad I could track a straight line and took them off. After doing so the handling was much better and predictable. I put them back on and shortened the reach hoping that will help with the handling. Initially the reach extended beyond the hoods by quite a bit and I was really stretched out. So now I shortened it to the same reach as my hoods. The weather has been pouring rain the past few days so I have not been able to get out and try it. Could that have been the cause of my horrible handling? I worried just taking my water bottle if a car passed me. The bike was extremely twitchy and couldn't be trusted with one hand.

Thanks
 

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Practice, practice, practice.
I tend to have the same problem in rainy, windy, TT's when I have my Tri-Spoke on. I also tend to point them up slightly (like in the early 90's) to give me better control.
 

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I just bought some Profile T2+ clip on bars. I've been playing with the angle, and the gap between them and all I can say is just take some rides. It does make the steering a little squirrly at first until you get the hang of it. If they are clip on bars, take a multi-tool along on a ride and adjust them as you go. Just make sure you smoke the bolts back down when you do I had a little diagreement with mine when I started climbing and had them a little too loose.
 

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I use Profile Design T2+ Cobras on my TT bike and the spacing between the arm pads (center to center) is about 13cm.

That said, it's easy to handle once you get used to it. That said as well, practice on empty streets of course for your own safety.

Additionally, even though I'm comfortable on my aerobars, I do NOT ride on them on streets with heavy traffic just because it's safer to have my hands on the base bars where the brakes are just in case etc etc.

All you seriously need is just some practice to get used to it. Really. Once you've done that, you'll then be able to know how to steer it etc easily and also be able to decide if you need some positional adjustments for comfort etc.

Good luck.

Oh and, here's a tip: Start with one hand on the aerobars and another on the hoods maybe in your case. Then slowly use both hands on it when you gain confidence.
 

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Some more tips: Your upper body weight should be supported by your armrest pads on your forearms. That means you may need to use a shorter stem when you have aerobars or clipons mounted. If you have to 'hold yourself up' with your hands way out there, or constantly be pushing back onto the saddle, you are probably too far extended. Being overextended makes the bike hard to control, makes your legs take a weird angle and will have you squirming around in pain after a short time...

Don Hanson
 

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Just a physics note which may help... if you consider the steering like a wrench on a nut/bolt it is easier to turn the farther out you hold. For instance steering on the hoods takes a lot less effort than steering with your hands at the center.

So shortening that distance will require more effort for the same amount of torque which could reduce twitchiness. But this is only a part of it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
We (my city) have been bombarded with thunderstorms and it isn't letting up. I did slide the bars in so the wide-out where the hands go is abut the same distance as the brakes. I really like using aero bars and want to remedy this so I feel safe. I have been using them for 20 years but the set up and handling on my madone is so totally different.

Thanks!!
 
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