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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi All,

Looking for a bit of advice. As some may have seen I am in the market for my first road bike. I have just been offered a never ridden* 2004 Cannondale R2000 for the price of a 2006 R700. The only caviet being it has a slight dent in the top tube. I've inspected the bike and there is no damage elsewhere to the bike and the dent its self seem pretty superficial.

What would peoples thoughts be on buying the bike with a damaged tube. How well can aluminum take a beating? I have similar dents on my (steel) mountain bike and they have never caused any problems over the 7 years they have been there. One thing that is sort of swaying me is the lifetime guarantee on the frame, as if there are any issues that arrise it should be taken care of.

All input good or bad appreciated

* appart from my test rides
 

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Fini les ecrase-"manets"!
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bits said:
Hi All,

Looking for a bit of advice. As some may have seen I am in the market for my first road bike. I have just been offered a never ridden* 2004 Cannondale R2000 for the price of a 2006 R700. The only caviet being it has a slight dent in the top tube. I've inspected the bike and there is no damage elsewhere to the bike and the dent its self seem pretty superficial.

What would peoples thoughts be on buying the bike with a damaged tube. How well can aluminum take a beating? I have similar dents on my (steel) mountain bike and they have never caused any problems over the 7 years they have been there. One thing that is sort of swaying me is the lifetime guarantee on the frame, as if there are any issues that arrise it should be taken care of.

All input good or bad appreciated

* appart from my test rides
I'd say you could go for it. You want to be careful about dents in aluminum, but if it's as superficial as you say, it could be OK. It's nice to have a scratch right off the bat, so you won't be so panicky about messing up your finish.

I'd want to make sure the dealer will handle the warranty as a new bike purchase, or whatever else is required by Can-o-ale--if the frame does fail because of the dent, you want to be sure you can make a warranty claim.

Ultimately, only you can decide if it's OK.
 

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I am not a metalurgist, but the fatigue characteristics of aluminum are very different from steel. A steel frame can be straightened, rear stays moved wider to accomodate the newer 130 mm axles, etc. For the most part, aluminum can't. That said, how large is the dent? Will the frame still be covered by the Cannondale warrenty or is this null and void? If the dent is superficial as you say, and the frame is under the life-time warrenty, I would say that you are getting a decent deal. If nothing else, buy the bike and sell the frame. Put the components on another frame.

Steve
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
supercal29 said:
I am not a metalurgist, but the fatigue characteristics of aluminum are very different from steel.
Yeh was aware of steels resilience and had an incling about poss issues with aluminum.

supercal29 said:
That said, how large is the dent? Will the frame still be covered by the Cannondale warrenty or is this null and void?
The dealer said the warranty would be fine. The dent its self from memory was about 3cm long running diagonally against the tube.
 

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top tube dent = OK

As a general rule, dents in the top tube are not an issue unless the metal is actually creased, regardless of the metal. Such a dent in CF would probably be catastrophic.
 

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Ping it

While what everyone else said is more scientific, I'd ping it with my finger. If it sounded thin I would pass.

I have an old Cdale beast of the east that I don't think I would ride if it had a dent. Than I have a K2 Evo that has a muck larger dent in the down tube and I would never be concerned with the frame failing first on it.
 
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