Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 20 of 80 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
510 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So cycling has stopped for me for a bit as I've purchased a new house and moving out of my condo. I plan to do most of the renovations in the new/old house. Besides the typical drill/impact gun, I have so far not acquired any large power tools as space was always an issue.

Now that I plan do do these renovations, it serves as a good excuse for me to make some acquisitions. I won't do all the purchases in one go, but would like to figure out which tools would be the best bang for the buck in usefulness for what I'm doing and maybe rent equipment that I don't need to use constantly.

Essentially, the renovations are mostly cosmetic. i.e. ripping out the old carpets, installing laminate floors, base boards, maybe re doing a few doors.

So which tools would you guys think are the most essential to get off the bat.

I was thinking: mitre saw, circular saw, nail gun/ compressor, table saw, jig saw

Most of the time when I do renovations, I've had a slew of friends come equipped with everything, so I've been spoiled in always having the right tool to do what I need. However if I needed to make due, what do you guys/gals think is essential to be able to get most renovations done.
 

·
hello
Joined
·
3,394 Posts
Compound miter saw or a circular saw for starters.
 

·
Adorable Furry Hombre
Joined
·
30,962 Posts
And air compressor and tank is a very handy thing. A few things.

A) When shopping check the current draw rating....it is very easy to buy a nice compressor....that will trip your household breakers unless it is on an idle unloaded circuit.

2) With air nail/staple guns....they NEED kept clean and lubricated. What Mike Homes and Yankee Workshop and DIY NEVER show...are fouled air-fastener-guns, that get very commonly fouled with dust in the air. They start double and triple firing generating Tourette Syndrome Carpentry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
510 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
That's what I had in mind as the first items to get. I wasn't so sure if it would be better to get the table saw or if the circular saw would suffice for now.
 

·
Adorable Furry Hombre
Joined
·
30,962 Posts
That's what I had in mind as the first items to get. I wasn't so sure if it would be better to get the table saw or if the circular saw would suffice for now.
A circular saw can suffice....but you'll need to be more thorough and less casual in carpentry procedure. AKA needing clamps and jigs to hold material and a cutting guide for the blade to follow. Nice table saws have a gate that locks to the table....but odds are you're not going to want to spend that much money, not in one tool.

/confession we have a full carpentry scenics shop at my work/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
510 Posts
Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Good thing with my new place is theres a small enclosed garage that I can setup. I don't mind taking more time to setup to make sure I get decent cuts.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,560 Posts
I would suggest that it depends on what you want to do and how experienced you are. My friend is a really top notch trim carpenter and I would trust him to do work with a circular saw that I would only attempt with my table saw (which he GAVE ME :thumbsup:) - stuff like finish carpentry and mouldings.

That said, my circular saw was the first tool I bought when I moved into my house and I've probably used it more often than anything else besides the cordless drill/driver (fencing, decking, misc. other stuff). My house was new though so I didn't have plans to touch anything inside requiring precision.

My jig saw is my favorite tool (Bosch, it really is fun to use) but I don't hardly ever have a need for it.

Buy some safety glasses and hearing protection too.
 

·
Boobies!
Joined
·
8,171 Posts
A circular saw can suffice....but you'll need to be more thorough and less casual in carpentry procedure. AKA needing clamps and jigs to hold material and a cutting guide for the blade to follow. Nice table saws have a gate that locks to the table....but odds are you're not going to want to spend that much money, not in one tool.

/confession we have a full carpentry scenics shop at my work/
I have made do with a small contractor's table saw, but it doesn't solve the problem of long straight cuts, especially in sheet goods.

Marc's suggestion is a good one--a decent circular saw, and then a guide system. I've been using a very simple 2 piece straight edge that slots together, and then you clamp on,

Dewalt has a new track saw system that is very nice (but not cheap):
https://www.amazon.com/DEWALT-DWS52...d=1477953998&sr=1-6&keywords=dewalt+panel+saw

Of course the sine qua non is the Festool track saw system.

I would start with a drill & driver set (as you mentioned), and add a miter saw--compound if you have dreams of crown molding or other complications.

If you need sheet goods cut, you can rip plywood or sheathing with the circular saw, or get it done at the store, and add the guide if you need to do serious finish work (say kitchen end panels or the like)--I got decent results on our kitchen and elsewhere using my bargain clamp guide and a good blade on a circular saw.

The small compressor and finish nailer sets are a godsend--don't worry about a framing nailer unless you have a lot of walls that you are moving--but you do want to practice your toe nailing.

Add a couple of sanders--1/4 sheet and circular as needed.

I have also gotten a lot of use out of a multi-tool for renovations. Fein is the gold standard here, but I'm still using a $18 Harbor Freight version with good blades purchased from Amazon. It's good for cutting in electrical boxes, undercutting moldings for flooring, and host of other tasks.

Two more tools that you can add--a good jigsaw (corded Bosch are great), and a portable planer (Mine's a Bosch as well). With a steady hand the portable planer is a good substitute for a jointer, and beats the heck out of a hand plane.
 

·
Master debator.
Joined
·
8,777 Posts
I have very few power tools other than the basics. Special tools I rent, especially if they are expensive. Around here you can sometimes borrow the correct tools for the job from the place you buy the materials from. The only tools I would buy would be specific say if I was into wood working. I would not buy things I will use once and let sit on a shelf.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,830 Posts
Sawzall.

It gets apart the crap you need to remove, before you start to use the other tools to put something new in place.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,579 Posts
Most important, get ones that fit. Don't get all starry eyed over the carbon fiber stuff. Remember, Stihl is real! And try to support your LTS.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
510 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Thanks for all the replies. I'm actually pretty familiar with construction and renovations as that's actually what I manage in my work. So I'm relatively comfortable using power tools. I'm not as seasoned as one that uses it on a daily basis, but I can always get the job done with the right tools.

I think I'll start doing some research in a decent mitre saw, circular saw, nail gun and compressor. It'll be a balancing act in what my my wallet will allow me to spend and what will be sufficient for the purposes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,696 Posts
Definitely add a Sawzall to your list its invaluable when taking out old doors. And anything that doesn't want to come out easy. A good compound miter saw and table saw are a must for flooring. As for nail guns you don't need to buy an air compressor. Modern battery powered nail guns are allot better. My recommendation is for Milwaukee tools they have every thing you will need on the 18v system. I am a professional Overhead door tech now but I spent most of my life as a Pro carpenter doing renovations on old houses on the east cost. I only buy Milwaukee cordless tools now And Dewalt for may large corded tools. The last thing I would add is a Hammer drill.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,110 Posts
Individual needs and projects will vary, but in my experience it goes something like this:

3/8" corded electric drill (but I use my cordless Bosch most)
Skil saw (circular saw)
Jig saw
Table saw - the small motorized units are pretty good. I find myself using my Makita more often than my 220 v Rockwell contractor's table saw.
Miter saw, with stand
Small pancake air compressor and a couple finish nail guns.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,038 Posts
I have always bought a tool when I need it and I have not bought stuff just because I might need it sometime. Projects always require many trips to the hardware store so you just buy the things you need at that time.

Drill, skill saw, crosscut/miter saw, recipocating saw (mostly for removal of wood, cutting nails etc). Table saw, shop vac. Harbor Freight has the lowest cost in this area. Some of their tools are kind of cheaply made. I would not do anything without a real good shop vac. With a lot of my tools I just connect the shop vac to the exhaust to suck up the wood. Keeps it out of your face and saves a lot of sweeping.


.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
942 Posts
Great suggestions in this thread, you guys seem to all know the drill.

I agree that it really depends on exactly what you are doing, and how *much* of it you are doing. For sure, to start, mitre saw, and multi-tool, plus typical cordless drill.
The multi-tool is priceless for undercutting jambs when installing wood floors, and countless other jobs.
Unless you are nailing in 3/4 wood floors, I'd skip the compressor/nailer off the bat.
If you are doing hardwood floors and need to rip finish boards, you have to get a decent table saw. Otherwise, wait till you really need it.
If you install a lot of drywall, I'd absolutely get a good corded drywall screw gun. It also works well for attaching deck boards, and small quantity framing (use screws versus nails).

Here's a good place to get decent tools, especially for occasional use. The C grade, on sale, can be pretty cheap, rugged and reliable, but with "not new" cosmetics.
https://bigskytool.com/
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
196 Posts
By far the tool I used the most is a cordless driver / drill. I've done a ton of work on my house, and am now on my 3rd one. My Dewalt literally burned out and the brushes were not serviceable. Loved my Makita, but wore out the batteries and new ones were as much as a whole new tool. Now I'm using a 12v Milwaukee hammer drill / impact driver set. Awesome. Has about as much power as my old 18v drill in a much small package.

My suggested list of power tools based on what you said you will be doing. First, get good tools. Pay up front and they will last many years or a lifetime.
Must Haves
- Cordless drill and an impact driver.
- 12" compound bevel miter saw. Use for flooring, molding, many many other cuts. Get blades for the material you're cutting - such as laminate. Don't bother with a sliding type. They tend to be less accurate.
- Foldable miter saw stand with adjustable feed support. Really needed for the saw if you make more than 1 cut.
- Shop vac. Huge is not needed - 5 gallon or so for good portability. Essential for cleaning up and dust control.
- Cordless oscillating multitool. A recent find for me - so many uses.
- Finish nailer. If doing moldings. I have air-powered but battery powered may be the way to go now. For finish work get a 18 GA nailer. 16 GA is pretty big.
- Air compressor for nailer. If you plan on any significant work, skip any "self lubricated" type and look for "oil lubricated". I burned out a quality self lubricated Porter Cable pancake type from heavy use. I like a 10 gallon - portable enough, fairly compact, and good air volume.
- Work lights. For illuminating your work when working at night. They are fairly cheap and can make a big impact on seeing what they hell you're doing.

Wait and See
- Circular saw. Love mine, but needed only for long cuts in sheet goods, or odd cuts in dimensional lumber / construction. I find I don't use it very often any more. For light use or trimming, consider a small cordless. Very portable and handy.
- Jig saw. Again, love mine but the multitool can often suffice and has a wider range of uses. Essential for scroll cutting, though.
- Sander, 5"circular random orbit. If you are doing sanding / refinishing.
- Sawsall / reciprocating demo saw. Very handy but get only if you are doing demo work.
- Table saw. Good for long, precise cuts. But they are expensive, big, and specialized. I would love one but can usually find an alternative with a different tool. Portable units are limited in the sheet goods they can handle. Really needed if you're doing cabinets / furniture projects.
- Router. Only if your projects demand it.
- Belt sander. Very handy for the right job to rapidly remove material on a big job. If you can find a good used one, get it. They last a long time.
- Power planer. Similar to a belt sander in use case. Good for fitting doors. I borrow my inlaw's.
 
1 - 20 of 80 Posts
Top