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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok so here's my first post.

I am moving to SF from LA next week and losing the car for a bike.
I been crashing on my friends couch between the move and enjoying riding his Eddy Merckx around and decided I want a road bike.
I have been scouring Craigslist from work pretty much constantly, but have decided to resist the urge for instant gratification and wait till I check out LBS in SF.

My gf obtained a Giant Yukon from her workplace for me. This is not the bike I desire but will treat it well until I get another.

This bike has not been ridden/touched/maintained in a few years.
The gf put some fancy road tires on it but I am ready to give this bike a full overhaul.

I plan on replacing the cables(maybe?) and handlebar grips(definitely).

I want to remove and fully clean just about every component but not replace anything if I don't have to.
What else should I concentrate on to get this bike back in shape?
This is from my father I guess, who never let me take a car to a mechanic even when we had to change headgaskets.

Is replacing anything on this bike even worth it? :skep:
I know this is roadbikereview, but you guys surely know something and I will join the roadbike cadre soon enough hopefully!

I think this overhaul is worth my time as a learning experience.

Maybe I'm just bored at work and want to talk! Gimme advice!
 

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Replacing parts that are still working is not "worth it".

Get a book like Zinn and the Art of Road Bike Maintenance. Read through it and when you find something that interests you, give it a try. A headset overhall is pretty easy and fun, and helps you understand how the frame and fork work together. Replacing cables is pretty easy too, and worthwhile, but you should buy a good cable cutter. You'll probably need to accumulate other tools as you do other jobs. Always use a good-quality tool that is designed for the job.
 
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You'll be fine. There's a lot of wrench heads in these forums who will make working on your bike sounds worse or harder than it is. Just remember that your working with steel/aluminum/carbon/ti products which you won't break. At worst you'll have to swing by your lbs for some fine tuning after you put everything back together. I do most of my own repairs and adjustments on my bike. Self taught by trial and error.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Cool thanks for the input guys!

I was looking at the park tools and see that they are kinda pricy.

I am assuming most tools are not bike specific, but what are some of the specialized ones that are definitely worth the money to have on hand? like, I never bought a "piston depressor" or whatever kinda instrument to reset a brake piston, but a c-clamp does just fine.
 

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poobert said:
Cool thanks for the input guys!

I was looking at the park tools and see that they are kinda pricy.

I am assuming most tools are not bike specific, but what are some of the specialized ones that are definitely worth the money to have on hand? like, I never bought a "piston depressor" or whatever kinda instrument to reset a brake piston, but a c-clamp does just fine.
Cone wrenches, cassette remover to start
 
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