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My last couple annual physicals have come back w/ high serum glucose levels. It was 105 last year, 100 this year, and I'm getting re-tested in a week. All the online info on being pre-diabetic says "lose weight, exercise, eat healthy," etc. to reduce glucose levels, but being a cyclist it's not like I sit around all day. I'm 39, 6 ft tall and 165 lbs, basically no fat on me and I eat home-cooked organic food most of the time. Diabetes is prevalent in my mom's family, so I've got a genetic predisposition.

My question is what else can I do to reduce the risk of developing diabetes? Lifestyle changes don't apply. Besides all the miles biking I play basketball or football regularly, I've never smoked, don't drink, etc. If anyone else is in a similar situation please advise! It's not like I can get any more active or lose more weight.
 

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Maybe...

Hmmmm, your glucose levels don't sound like they are high (105 - 100). Insulin resistance is lowered two ways. Excercise and minimizing the intake of sugar. I have had a standing glucose test several months ago, and found out that my pancreas is a tad slow (too many Chipotle burritos). From what I am understanding, I will NEVER be able to get this lost pancreas function back. However, what I can control, I have done so successfully. So, with steady exercise and a lifestyle change, things have turned around. Gone are the days of starchy snacks, bad carbs, refined sugars, etc...I now eat celery sticks w/ natural PB, raw almonds, poultry, salads.

26 pounds later, I feel great and I am glad that I caught this early :thumbsup: .

Good luck,

BWJ
 

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Sounds like you need to eliminate the "white" in your diet. Immediately swear off all white breads, refined sugars and white starches such as pasta and rice. Switch to whole wheat breads, whole wheat pasta, brown rice, etc. Being diabetic myself, I've found that these are the foods that cause my blood sugar to spike the most, and undoubtably were the root of me becoming diabetic to begin with. For me, the worst items are the white breads and pastas. They cause a higher spike than even sweets like cakes and ice cream. Bananas are also a trigger for me. Do some research on foods that are bad for diabetics and do your best to eliminate those, and hopefully you'll be fine. Good luck!
 

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Diabetic since 2001 after a pancreas attack that landed me in the hospital ICU for 14 days. I was running long distance at the time, weighed 173 at 5ft 9in., and didn't eat enough to sustain my activity which landed me in ICU.

I had to stop running for years and started taking insulin shots. :( It sucked.

The best thing I did and what I would HIGHLY RECOMMEND TO YOU is going to a Diabetic Specific Physician. I mean you find the best person in your area and go to them and then religiously follow their advice.

EDIT: why finding a physician is important; everyone is different and you may get 100 different responses here, but we are not all endocrinologist. Additionally an annual physical only provides a basic reading of your blood so you need more detailed information. To diabetics detailed and accurate information is key.

Everyone who has diabetes is a little different some of heavy, some eat horrible, some have low tolerance for certain foods, etc... so you will need to work with someone to be taught how to track the performance of your own body then do something about preventing spikes in your blood sugar.

Also, this is huge; LIFE IS NOT OVER!!! You are not going to die just because you are diabetic so don't worry yourself because high stress and worries actually cause sugars to go higher.
 

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I recommend getting the book Dr. Bernstein's Diabetes Solution. Following the guidelines in that book have kept me from becoming diabetic like my dad and brothers.
 

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Regular exercise and low body fat are the main protective factors and it sounds like you've got those covered. Sometimes people just have shitty genes and it sounds like you're one of them. As others have suggested keep doing what you're doing and focus on controlling blood glucose levels to prevent the secondary bad health consequences of glucose intolerance.
 

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If your glucose comes back elevated this time be sure to follow up with an endocrinologist. You need a full workup specific for diabetes not just a blood glucose.
 

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Diet

I'm on a Diabetes medicine but I have the same issues, the answers are diet and exercise and drink lots of water. That does it for me. My Diabetes is probably hereditary. If I cheat on my diet and eat cookies and a white bread sandwich I'm paying for it the rest of the day. It's amazing how good you can feel if you eat the right foods.
 

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Agree with the above. In addition, you must avoid high fructose corn syrup and hydrogenated oils like the plague. Start reading labels. Take magnesium 4-500 mg a day. Have your hormone levels checked periodically by an anti-aging doctor. Low testosterone increases insulin resistance. Forget about endocrinologists, they wait until you have full- blown diabetes before they do anything. Your best strategy right now is prevention. You have already won half the battle since you cycle and are not overweight.

Red wine also improves insulin sensitivity. If you don't drink, find red wine extract in capsules at the health food store.

Your blood sugar levels indicate you have poor glucose control due to insulin resistance, a common genetic finding in about 25% of caucasians, 35% of hispanics and 45% blacks. A lousy lifestyle will lead to diabetes.

Metformin is a prescription drug that improves insulin sensitivity. There is some debate in the medical community as the best time to start Metformin. IMO the sooner the better. Excess glucose levels damage ( AGEs or glycation of proteins) cells and organs over the long term. Why wait to damage your body when Metformin has been around for three decades and is very safe even when improperly prescribed. Again IMO preventing damage makes more sense to me than treating the damage done by high glucose levels.
 

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Don Duende said:
Agree with the above. In addition, you must avoid high fructose corn syrup and hydrogenated oils like the plague. Start reading labels. Take magnesium 4-500 mg a day. Have your hormone levels checked periodically by an anti-aging doctor. Low testosterone increases insulin resistance. Forget about endocrinologists, they wait until you have full- blown diabetes before they do anything. Your best strategy right now is prevention. You have already won half the battle since you cycle and are not overweight.

Red wine also improves insulin sensitivity. If you don't drink, find red wine extract in capsules at the health food store.

Your blood sugar levels indicate you have poor glucose control due to insulin resistance, a common genetic finding in about 25% of caucasians, 35% of hispanics and 45% blacks. A lousy lifestyle will lead to diabetes.

Metformin is a prescription drug that improves insulin sensitivity. There is some debate in the medical community as the best time to start Metformin. IMO the sooner the better. Excess glucose levels damage ( AGEs or glycation of proteins) cells and organs over the long term. Why wait to damage your body when Metformin has been around for three decades and is very safe even when improperly prescribed. Again IMO preventing damage makes more sense to me than treating the damage done by high glucose levels.
................................................................................................................................

That is an excellent post and response Don Duende. I'm taking Metformin and I think it's helping and safe to use. I am fortunate to have a great Doc, he's also a cyclist, and a guy that listens to his patients. BTW, my water consumption is about 100 ounces a day (I weigh 180 and 6'2" and 50 years) and that has lowered my BP reading to 138/70 from 160/90. I do take 40mg of Linisopril but that's it at the drug counter for me. Thanks again.
 

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? zyprexa? or other meds.

there is a great deal of info coming out that taking zyprexa / olanzapine can lead to diabetes. the weight gain data is solid, the diabetes is a little less solid, but to me convincing. the mechanism is not nailed down, yet: it can increase prolactin levels, and it may kill pancreatic cells. i have not looked for data regarding diabetes linked to zyprexa in the absence of weight gain, but it could be out there.

if you happen to be taking zyprexa [this is not so outlandish: 7 million prescriptions were written last year, and lilly has made a major push to encourage a variety of off-label indications], you could get off zyprexa, and find other ways to treat whatever the reason was (besides the doc being encouraged by a drug rep) for you taking zyprexa.

for any other prescription meds, you can google the medication name, and 'diabetes' and see what comes up.
 

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cyclust said:
Sounds like you need to eliminate the "white" in your diet. Immediately swear off all white breads, refined sugars and white starches such as pasta and rice. Switch to whole wheat breads, whole wheat pasta, brown rice, etc. Being diabetic myself, I've found that these are the foods that cause my blood sugar to spike the most, and undoubtably were the root of me becoming diabetic to begin with. For me, the worst items are the white breads and pastas. They cause a higher spike than even sweets like cakes and ice cream. Bananas are also a trigger for me. Do some research on foods that are bad for diabetics and do your best to eliminate those, and hopefully you'll be fine. Good luck!
I'm in about this same situation, though I'm pre- rather than diabetic, and I've had about the same experience. Another condition made me cut back on my exercise a few months ago (I was burning 7000-10,000 calories a week), and my weight, blood pressure and glucose rocketed up instantly (shouldn't have been a surprise, but the rate was). When I got back to my normal routine, everything stablized in a matter of a few weeks. BP went from 140/96 to 110/60, and my glucose dropped from the 110 range to the 70s.
 

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chang100 said:
My last couple annual physicals have come back w/ high serum glucose levels. It was 105 last year, 100 this year, and I'm getting re-tested in a week. All the online info on being pre-diabetic says "lose weight, exercise, eat healthy," etc. to reduce glucose levels, but being a cyclist it's not like I sit around all day. I'm 39, 6 ft tall and 165 lbs, basically no fat on me and I eat home-cooked organic food most of the time. Diabetes is prevalent in my mom's family, so I've got a genetic predisposition.

My question is what else can I do to reduce the risk of developing diabetes? Lifestyle changes don't apply. Besides all the miles biking I play basketball or football regularly, I've never smoked, don't drink, etc. If anyone else is in a similar situation please advise! It's not like I can get any more active or lose more weight.
The first thing I would do is get a second opinion. A blood sugar reading of 100 or even 105 should not put in the catagory of pre-diabetic. When i was diagnosed with diabetes at the age of 16, I am 35 now, my blood sugar level fasting, was over 500. Did they do an A1C blood glucose test?, The a1c shows an average of your blood sugar levels from the past 3 months, Someone with your height, weight and phisical activity and eating habbits I wouldnt be to allarmed, it sounds like you are doing all of the right things, Pay attention to frequent thirst and frequent urination. Also massive weight loss is another sign. Good luck

Please let us know what the results of your next test are.

Chris
 

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You don't really fit the profile of a Type 2 (insulin resistant) diabetic. You may be on your way to being a Type 1(insulin dependent). Quite possibly your beta cells in your pancreas(the ones that produce the insulin) are being attacked by your immune system.

Some people might think I am crazy, but I would rather be a T1(which I am) than a T2.
 

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What a timely post.
Last night I did the American Heart Association test for predicting heart attacks. One of the factors that was used in the equation was for fasting BG. I looked at my last two blood tests and both were around 100. My doctor never mentioned a possibility of pre diabetes as a issue, but am now concerned (not hysterical) about it.
I had written off my excessive sweating, slower healing, and occasional lack of energy to the normal process of aging. I am now 57 and can still pound out a decent Century, but it is definitely something to talk about to my GP.
So when does one really begin to worry about elevated BG? When one goes into the ICU for fourteen days? Sure hope not. That happened to g8keeper and also to my Office managers son.
 
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