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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've been trying to clean off the old glue from a carbon tubular wheel to mount a new tire. But, it is taking forever! I have about 1/8th done and it has taken hours and hours over the course of weeks since I get so tired of it I have to walk away for awhile.

I am so close to just paying someone to do it... I'm a DIY'er so this notion hurts my soul.

I've read a lot on the forums, watched lots of videos and it just isn't working (well enough). I've been using goo gone and acetone. I think go gone works better, but still such a long long slog. Most of the forum posts on the subject say a few hours and lots of elbow grease. I wish! I have already put in about 3 "a few hour" sessions with lots of elbow grease over the last month. And I am only about 1/8th of the way through.

Please, someone give me the magic bullet. How do you get this S&^@ off within a reasonable amount of time (like an afternoon)?

thank you! It's so nice out and I'm dying to get out for some rides.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I've watched that video, 30 to 40 minutes per rim, I wish!

I'm thinking I put too much glue on when mounting these up last summer. I'm going to do a basic clean and mount them up... call it good.

thanks for the help!
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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I never clean the old glue off. On most wheels I glue from new it always stays on in a nice even layer when pulling a punctured/dead tire off. I just add more and mount the new tire. On tires where the glue pulls off randomly I build up the bare spots rather than removing the old glue.
 

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Simple answer: Clinchers!

Seriously, the one glaring fault in the video; the guy's wearing CLEAN CLOTHES! You definitely want to wear junk while working with tubular glue.

If acetone or Goo Gone aren't working, try a hair dryer or heat gun. I doubt you'll reach temps high enough to damage the carbon. As an alternative, you could apply a heating pad to the non-glue side of the rim, or try submerging a section of the rim in hot water.

Otherwise, CLINCHERS!
 

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I know this isn't helpful, but in this day and age where clinchers are arguably as good as, if not better than tubular tyres, why anyone would want to deal with the hassle of tubs is beyond me.

Having said that, acetone, heat and patience - good luck :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
thanks for the suggestions, going to spend the afternoon on this...

I already have clinchers... but I do love tubulars! Yeah, they are a hassle, but so awesome. Having both, I have to say there is a difference, to me anyway. A signficant difference too! Clinchers for rougher roads and tubs for the climbs and nice road rides.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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I know this isn't helpful, but in this day and age where clinchers are arguably as good as, if not better than tubular tyres, why anyone would want to deal with the hassle of tubs is beyond me.

Having said that, acetone, heat and patience - good luck :)
The weight difference is still huge. And I really like the idea of my tire staying on the rim if/when I flat.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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thanks for the suggestions, going to spend the afternoon on this...

I already have clinchers... but I do love tubulars! Yeah, they are a hassle, but so awesome. Having both, I have to say there is a difference, to me anyway. A signficant difference too! Clinchers for rougher roads and tubs for the climbs and nice road rides.
:skep:....
 

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thanks for the suggestions, going to spend the afternoon on this...

I already have clinchers... but I do love tubulars! Yeah, they are a hassle, but so awesome. Having both, I have to say there is a difference, to me anyway. A signficant difference too! Clinchers for rougher roads and tubs for the climbs and nice road rides.
If you say you feel a difference I won't argue (I can't really tell myself) but I don't get your logic at all. Other than tubs for climbs because they are lighter, I get that.

And it no surprise you like tubs more because all your rides with them are on nice roads and you ride clinchers on bad roads. Goes to figure you'd think tubs ride better given that.
You should try it the other way around and ride tubs on bad roads and clinchers on good just for the heck of it and see if you still think the same way about each.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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If you say you feel a difference I won't argue (I can't really tell myself) but I don't get your logic at all. Other than tubs for climbs because they are lighter, I get that.

And it no surprise you like tubs more because all your rides with them are on nice roads and you ride clinchers on bad roads. Goes to figure you'd think tubs ride better given that.
You should try it the other way around and ride tubs on bad roads and clinchers on good just for the heck of it and see if you still think the same way about each.
Exactly what I was thinking. Why would you ride clinchers on bad roads and 'save' your tubulars for smooth roads? The climbing/weight thing makes sense, but that's all that does.
 

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I used tubulars for the first 30 years of my riding life (we called 'em sew-ups, son) and I never had one roll off my rim. Sure, I didn't have carbon rims (and I still don't) but I never cleaned the rims when I had to remount a tire. I'd just put a little bit more glue onto the rims. Hey, the old glue is still sticky as heck.

Nowadays I have one bicycle set up for clinchers and the other for sew-ups. Flats on the clinchers continue to scare the heck out of me. Wobble & slide city. A feeling that they're gonna roll off the rim at any second. With the tubulars, things just go bumpy. As for the ride quality, yeah, the tubs do ride with a bit more elan, ease and security, but not by enough to matter for me.
 

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Many heat guns can definitely reach temps that can damage carbon, and other things. A hair dryer generally won't. Use care with heat guns. A short application of heat and just enough to get the job done is best.
 
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