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Old Tunnel Road
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Are prescription cycling glasses available that have the prescription in the lens instead of the usual cycling glasses with a set of prescription lenses inserted behind them resulting in wearing the equivalent of two sets of glasses. I wear veralux blended bifocals.
 

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rockridge said:
Are prescription cycling glasses available that have the prescription in the lens instead of the usual cycling glasses with a set of prescription lenses inserted behind them resulting in wearing the equivalent of two sets of glasses. I wear veralux blended bifocals.
Ask and ye shall receive. Try these folks, Sports Optical. They get rave reviews.
 

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just do a google of "Prescription Cycling Glasses" and you will find lots. If your correction isn't bad they can do some of the wrap style frames. If it's a high index, then you are pretty well stuck with the non-areo frames like me.
 

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rockridge said:
Are prescription cycling glasses available that have the prescription in the lens instead of the usual cycling glasses with a set of prescription lenses inserted behind them resulting in wearing the equivalent of two sets of glasses. I wear veralux blended bifocals.
Zealoptics.com is another outfit that can hook you up. I had a favorable experience with them.
 

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If possible go local. Rudy's, oakley's ect can usually be found locally. I believe this ensures a proper fit. Nothing against any of the places mentioned but I feel with Rx lenses is the best all around bet....:)
 

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RX SPEX is the best

run by former triathletes i think the story goes. have had two pairs of rudy's build up... think its runs around $75 for the lenses plus the frame, usually around $175 total or around there... got a sweet set of White Rudy's with Racning Red lenses this summer and couldn't be more pleased... sunglasses can be difficult as they are fairly curved, so make sure whomever you choose they've done it before...


http://www.rx-spex.com/home/index.html
 

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Spend the money and get Oakleys. I have polarized gold iridium Twentys and would gladly spend the $375 again. Optics are perfect in Oakley glasses and they'll do any color lense in any frame. You can also get glasses (like Twentys) that you can wear off the bike and not look like a complete tool.
 

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jaded bitter joy crusher
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merckx56 said:
Spend the money and get Oakleys. I have polarized gold iridium Twentys and would gladly spend the $375 again. Optics are perfect in Oakley glasses and they'll do any color lense in any frame. You can also get glasses (like Twentys) that you can wear off the bike and not look like a complete tool.
Oakley can only acccommodate a limited range of prescriptions. If you need more than -4.0 or have much astigmatism you're out of luck.
 

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Cowboy up
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I went with Rx inserts so I could change lenses for light conditions (sunny, overcast, or dusk/night). If you get in-frame prescription do people get multiple lenses or just get medium tint such as red?
 

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Art853 said:
I went with Rx inserts so I could change lenses for light conditions (sunny, overcast, or dusk/night). If you get in-frame prescription do people get multiple lenses or just get medium tint such as red?
Note that Sports Optical....and possibly other places....make prescription lenses in the wrap-around style in the sunglasses. Given that, if you want yellow and grey lenses, you would order a pair of yellow prescription lense, as well as a pair of grey prescription lenses, and then change them out just as if they weren't prescription lenses.

The benefit to this system is that certain aberration in the eye are difficult to correct with a decreased distance from the eye to an insert, so prescription lenses that fit as the non prescription lenses can possibly resolve this. Also, your inserts are more likely to fog than glasses without inserts. It's worse with inserts since there are now 4 surfaces, instead of two, to fog. Likewise light transmission is better with only 2 glass surfaces as opposed to four. With non-prescription lenses, the best light transmission you can get is roughly 92.3%. With the addition of inserts, light transmission drops to roughly 84.9%. (This assumes 4% Fresnel relfections at each glass surface and also presumes that no anti reflective coatings are used. AR coatings will increase transmission; however, transmission will still be less through 4 surfaces as opposed to two.).
 

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Cowboy up
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I haven't had problems with fogging in the Rx insert glasses I've used so far (Bolle). But there are drawbacks to these as Alienator points out. Visually, it would be nicer to have one lense instead of two with the inserts. However the cost of multiple prescription lenses led me to chose the Rx insert. Plus the potential for having my presciption change leading to a new round of lense buying.

The local optical shop I visited didn't have much selection for in-frame prescription sport models. He mentioned there are difficulties involved with makeing prescription sport glasses in terms of their visual performance due to the curvature of most lenses.
 

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Squirrel Hunter
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Inserts

Art853 said:
I haven't had problems with fogging in the Rx insert glasses I've used so far (Bolle). But there are drawbacks to these as Alienator points out. Visually, it would be nicer to have one lense instead of two with the inserts. However the cost of multiple prescription lenses led me to chose the Rx insert. Plus the potential for having my presciption change leading to a new round of lense buying.
Similar experience for me. I use Rudy's and have no problem with fogging and the inserts do not give me a double lense feel like the older versions decades ago. I can change the wrap lenses to deal with varying light and weather conditions. A new RX is just an inexpensive replacement of the insert lense.

Previously I went with the ground prescription lense in a pair of Oakley sunglasses. Great optics but awful frame quality and customer service. One of the temples broke in the middle and when I sent them in for warranty Oakley said the frames were not covered because the glasses did not have the original lenses. What a crock, the break in the temple/earpiece was two inches away from the lense and had nothing to do with it. After some haggling and spending even more money another temple broke. I will never send Oakley any more of my money.
 

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Colorado Springs, CO
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Those Cool Glasses Probably Can't Handle Bifocals

I wear bifocals and my local optician said that you'll need a "framed" lens to accommodate that type of Rx. It has to do with the way that the bifocal set up in the lens an the way that it is "aimed" for your eye to focus onto.

I have the Rudy project frames (that have my distance and bifocal Rx in them) with the overlay sunglass piece that clips onto the frame. I got a dark, amber, and clear overlay so I can switch them out depending on the brightness of the day. The shape of the overlay does a really good job of keeping the wind out of my eyes. I have never had a problem with them fogging up either. I even use them skiing.
 

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Optilabs in the UK

I bought a pair of polarized cycling glasses from them a couple of years ago and couldn't be happier. Reasonable price and quick shipping. I believe they make bifocals. The nice thing about polarized is that they conform to the lighting conditions.
 

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Impulse Athletic Coaching
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Fredke said:
Oakley can only acccommodate a limited range of prescriptions. If you need more than -4.0 or have much astigmatism you're out of luck.
Nailed it. I have -4.75 and I was out of luck on everything but their regular glasses. I wound up getting contacts and using their glasses just because they're so damn good. Look cool, fit perfect, etc. Best way to do it is to go local.
 

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glasses

I used Bolle glasses with inserts for several years but didn't like them because they were heavy and hard to keep clean. A couple of years ago, I bought some Ray Bans that are semi-wrap around, and I like them much better. They have very durable metal frames, and I was able to get bifocal lenses, at a much lower cost than Oakleys. Ray Ban has many styles of sport sunglasses that are suitable for cycling. I tried on various pairs at Lens Crafters until I found one I liked. I guarantee they are more durable than most cycling specific glasses.
 

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Prescription Cycling Sunglasses

Are prescription cycling glasses available that have the prescription in the lens instead of the usual cycling glasses with a set of prescription lenses inserted behind them resulting in wearing the equivalent of two sets of glasses. I wear veralux blended bifocals.
Yes you totally can! I have a pretty strong prescription and I got progressive polarized Oakley’s (Half Jacket). I ordered them online at SportRx.com and the opticians helped me pick out exactly what I was looking for on the bike. They have Rudy Project and Tifosi too!
 
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